Press Release: Purple Books Revised, Updated, 7th Ed., Textbook, NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Available from Purple Books, CRRbooks.com, November 2017: new 7th edition textbook with the only updated NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, and State WKT, written knowledge test, information for students and court reporters.

350 pages, CRRbooks.com by Monette Benoit: Complete Written Knowledge Test Textbook, Seventh Edition, Revised and Updated for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs with the NCRA CRC Primer

Tests change. Exam questions and multiple choices are not repeated. Exam fees are pricey.

Updated, expanded text chapters: Test-Taking Tips, Focus; Legal, Latin Terminology; Court Reporting Rules; English, Grammar, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions; Medical Information; Computer Terminology, Technology, CRC Prep, Ethics, Windows, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions; Review

98% successful ‘Done In One’ pass rate continues on NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSR WKT material when Purple Books study sets are a primary source. Plus, you join thousands of students and court reporters who earned their RPR, CSR, and the elite RDR certification with Purple Books test-prep.

Study the only textbook and textbook package for the RPR, CSRs, and NCRA’s RDR written exam.
With thorough prep, you will pass the first time by learning how to answer, how to take the test.

Purple Books are written by a court reporter, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, paralegal, with an educator who earned a B.S. in English and a M. Ed.

Since 1990, time-tested, proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study —
students and court reporters continue to write “best investment — ever.”

* Plus, 7th edition textbook includes the CRC, Certified Realtime Captioner, Primer because many reporters now provide CART captioning, and certifications are now requested by companies, consumers for their files.

RPR, RDR, and state CSR candidates focus on the popular “Complete Test Prep Set” that includes: the Textbook, Workbook (*2,002 practice questions), Companion Guide (cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice questions), and RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Complete Set includes 4 test-prep books: http://crrbooks.com/product/written-exams
In this set, the Realtime Vocabulary Workbook is $ 8.00 (regularly: $ 36)

Pedagogically sound, each book reviews and covers material with facts, tips, and information.

Purple Books maximize your time, your expenses, and your results!

Students and professionals also seek tutoring and career counseling with Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer. No two people are alike. Customized sessions are created. Start today.
Plan and prepare now. Monette is committed to helping you. Email: Monette@CRRbooks.com

‘Done In One’ Testimonials, Pricing online www.CRRbooks.com

Press Release: Purple Books Pass Rate 99% for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

The Purple Books, CRRbooks.com, is proud to share: January’s 2017 RPR and multiple State CSR pass rates were over 99%.

CA’s CSR tests in March; NY’s Civil Service Court Reporter test is May; NCRA’s RPR and RDR is April 8 – 20; IL, TX, and WA test April 2017. Additional states and NCRA have exam registration deadlines.

Learn ‘how’ to answer, so you will be Done In One, too.

Complete Set, Purple Books, 4 books: http://crrbooks.com/product/written-exams The ‘Realtime Vocab Workbook’ is $ 8.00 (regular price: $ 36.00) when the Complete Set is ordered.

Trio Set, Purple Books, 3 books: http://crrbooks.com/…/2-trio-test-prep-3-book-set-must-have…

Many students and reporters continue to write “it was the best investment – ever.”

Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and information the Purple Books are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study

Study the only textbook and textbook package for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs.
Now, the Purple Books is the only material available for NCRA’s RDR written exam.

The 7th edition textbook for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, State exams, New York’s Civil Service Exam, with the NCRA CRC Primer by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner contains updated, expanded chapters: Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics. Detailed chapters include Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR candidates focus on the popular “Complete Test Prep Set” that includes: *Textbook, **Companion Workbook (*2,002 practice questions), ***Companion Guide (cross references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice questions), and the ****RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Questions and multiple choices on exams are not repeated, so don’t try memorizing them. Instead, learn how to take the test!

Thousands of students, novice and long-time reporters advance skills with Purple Books, CRR Books, Test-Prep Material.

Students and professionals also seek tutoring and career counseling with Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer. No two people are alike. Custom sessions are created, per your requests. Start today. Plan and prepare now. Monette wants to help you.
CRRbooks.com Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Purple Books, Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.
Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

Press Release: Plan Now! Prepare Now! 98% Successful Pass

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

October’s NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSR written exams are right around the corner. Currently, registration periods are open.

Plan now! Prepare now to become one of the 98% successful pass rate by students, court reporters, and CART Captioners on the RPR, RDR, and State CSR exams.

Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and
proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study

RPR, RDR, and State CSR candidates focus on the popular “Full Test Prep Set” that includes: Textbook, Workbook (*2,002 practice test questions), Companion Study Guide (cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice questions), and RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Questions and multiple choices on exams are not repeated, so don’t try memorizing them. Instead, learn how to take the test!

Study the only textbook and textbook package for the RPR and now the only material available for the RDR exam.

RPR and CSR candidates: “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” are detailed online.

RDR candidates have two choices to earn the most elite certification within our court reporting profession: “Full Test Prep Set” — or the updated, revised Complete Test Prep Textbook, 6th edition, and RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors,
CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters.

CRRbooks.com is committed to helping you to Get ‘er Done in Just One.

CRR Books released the revised and updated Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Written Test Prep Textbook, Sixth Edition, 2015.

The text by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner, contains updated, expanded chapters covering: Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics. Detailed chapters include: Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

Thousands of students and novice and long-time reporters advance skills with CRR Books Test Prep Material. Students and professionals also seek tutoring and career counseling with Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer. No two people are alike. Custom sessions are created. Start today. Plan and prepare now! Monette wants to help you.
www.CRRbooks.com Monette@CRRbooks.com

Press Release NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Exams

Press Release NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Exams

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

98% successful pass rate by students and court reporters on NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and on State CSR written exams.

Court Reporter Reference Books has released the revised and updated Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Written Test Prep Textbook, Sixth Edition. This textbook is available now on www.CRRbooks.com.

This is the ­most complete written test prep textbook available to students, teachers, and to novice and veteran court reporters.

The textbook by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner, has updated and expanded chapters:

Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics.

Detailed chapters include: Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

The popular “Test Prep Set” includes a 4-volume set:
1. Textbook, 6th Edition, Revised, Updated for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSR;
2. Workbook, (with approximately 2,002 practice test questions and answer key);
3. Companion Study Guide (cross-references every word in the workbook to learn ‘how’ to take a test and specifically ‘how’ to answer a question with multiple choice a-b-c-d);
4. RealTime Vocabulary Workbook (expands vocabulary growth with word recognition and comprehension to help students and reporters know how to identify and how to build words)

*** NCRA’s RDR test candidates successfully use the only textbook and only realtime vocabulary workbook to earn the most elite RDR, Registered, Diplomate Reporter, certification within the court reporting profession.

“Get ‘Er Done In Just One” – Study the “purple books” that are pedagogically sound and cover a wealth of material with facts and information. Testimonials from students, instructors, and court reporters are online for you to review.

All material is time-tested, proven for both the classroom and independent study.

CRRbooks.com lists complete details.

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part III of III

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I began: Part I began: One student, in the 225 wpm (words per minute) exit room in a court reporting program, “is scared to death of passing the state certification test and national certification. Then people will see that I can’t write accurately! I changed almost everything in my theory to brief forms, one strokes, to pass my tests. I was told to do this to advance in my speed classes. Everyone is doing this! I read through all my errors on each test! … Help me.” …

Part II began: Softly, I replied, “Perhaps you do not want to swan dive into the mind games.” …

We each can evolve to a better “spot” when we choose opportunities or when we are given ultimatums, yes?

Perhaps there has never been a better time to expand your skills. Spot on, yes?

Or perhaps you believe there has to be a “secret sauce” to reaching your goal, your desired result.

Where do you want to be in three months? Three weeks? Tomorrow at 3:00?

Part III of III:

Many court reporters are nearing retirement.

This will open new markets for individuals who are intent on shifting with expanding, new opportunities. Big fact.

In short, what might conflict with your goals to meet new opportunities, and what energy might expand your current strengths? This is one of many focus topics within my tutoring and empowerment coaching.

As you discover the specifics to the above-listed details in your private and professional world you will then be able to make choices to propel you to organize your fears.

Perhaps we are struggling too hard. Perhaps we want to know more about our fears.

I believe that organizing fears is a powerful step to moving toward your distinctive goals – whether it is to read your accurate notes in school to transcribe a test, whether it is to train yourself for a better position with your work, or whether a goal is to follow your heart’s desire with a new path that you create.

Fear can be a motivator.

Setbacks can be a motivator, too.

We know this “motivator” with 95 percent accuracy each day that we are required to earn while in school. We know this with the required accuracy on each job. Fact.

Once we have identified the fear(s) then we can focus on what is beckoning with all our resources and with our multi-faceted talents.

For the next two weeks I would like to suggest that you make a list of your goals, a list containing your fears, and a list of what is between the goal(s) and the fear(s).

As you explore your list for two weeks (okay, one week if you desire), I promise you that you will see your path and your challenges from a different lens.

I believe that when you understand what is truly inspiring you, and what is limiting you, you are then the master of your possibilities. Spot on focus.

We know that history has been exacted because we, court reporters, were motivated – with exacting discipline.

We are inspired and encouraged to be our best. Again, this is our normal.

Always we simply reinforce, and always we expand our skills. Always we explore.

Always we simply realign, and always we identify our goals.

Always we seek to identify our resistance to our current goals.

And perhaps we want to focus upon owning our fears.

I wish you wonderful growth, vast professional success, and an awesome, peaceful holiday.

Spot on, and yes, this is our normal. Fact.

Part I of III is posted November 14, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted December 5, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted December 20, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now, Part III of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 24, 2013

Part I began: The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

Part II began: We agreed to assess goals that had been met as a student and to evaluate where she is now as a certified court reporter.

The court reporter then said (I have permission to share) “When I was going to school then, I was not putting in as much as I should have. Then working with you, I decided I could do this – I really could do this. I decided to not do this and to not do that, but to really do this and to not make excuses. That was how I came a long way. I focused as you advised.”

Thus, we spent our time working together constructively, realistically focusing.

Part III: Instead of focusing on the loud voice in her head, we focused on the tasks that would realistically work with her present schedule and her goals now. Today.

Her question “exactly why am I doing this now?” remained with me after we scheduled updates and ended our time together.

This very question itself, in my opinion, will give you freedom.

Have you asked yourself this question and identified what is important?

Have you asked yourself this question on a good day – and not when events are comedy for Saturday Night Live?

I believe this is an excellent question. We take risks when we ask the question, “Why?”

Together we focused on the nutrition for the goals.

The court reporter and I made a conscious choice to create strength with training while working.

What I heard the court reporter say – and what was identified later by her words – were her fears. I heard, “I am afraid …” Her true fears were shared “straight up.”

Yes, I could hear fear in her voice, as well as the frustration.

I could hear fear as very real facts were shared by this working reporter.

When she was a court reporting student, she fear identified, too. Together we addressed the fears then.

Together we walked straight into her fears now.

Fear can be a motivator – if we are moving away from fears or toward goals.

I believe that we are imprinted with past moments.

My opinion is that any professional training that requires excellent daily standards as we learn a new language and begin to build technical skills will create survival skills that any TV reality show would ever understand.

Instead of “You’re Fired,” our TV show could be called “You Passed! You’re Hired!”

We are not cast on an island to fend for ourselves alone, though it may sure feel close to that.

Individuals outside our profession are often stunned to learn that pass rates on tests in our court reporting speedbuilding classes require a 95 to “pass” up to the higher speed.

A grade of 94 is not a passing grade in court reporting school within a 60- to 225-word per minute speed class. (I used to complain to my parents, each educators, “94 is a failing grade!” Mom and Dad, would smile, “You’re the one who chose the court reporting schooling and the NCRA-approved training, yes?” I would sigh, “Yes, but – ”)

We need a minimum of two tests (some schools require three tests) at 95 before we “pass” to the next speed.

Yes, we are challenged to always strive for perfection… in school, and then on the job. Always.

Having attended court reporting school myself when (it seemed like) every day was “you didn’t pass this one” as the (speed test) papers were handed back to students. To me, these were moments that could weaken individuals outside of our field.

I still refer to my court reporting schooling as “walking barefoot on broken glass.” Really. Good glass.

Exactly why are you doing this now? Is it your passion? Is it your desire to help others in court, depositions, captioning TV and/or providing CART? This is just a sampling where we know our skills are now valued and appreciated.

Do you have a vision where you want to go? Are you there now? Do you have support for your choices now? Have you met individuals who are fun and are proof to the fact that students and working court reporters do tweak their skills, do advance goals and do not let daily fears guide them?

Are you worried about others who may judge you on your choices? I have asked this question and listened to very private opinions.

I have also heard individuals say, “Nah, I just want to stay employed and pay my bills, okay?” Got it.

Perhaps asking the “exactly why am I doing this now” question is the healthiest step forward. My opinion is that by going within to ask the questions that are creating the fears is a good, healthy step.

Court reporters do not let the tail wag the dog.

Seeking success we define exactly why we are doing this now.

Part I of III is posted May 1, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted May 15, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now, Part II of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part II of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 15, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

We agreed to assess goals that had been met as a student and to evaluate where she is now as a certified court reporter.

The court reporter then said (I have permission to share) “When I was going to school then, I was not putting in as much as I should have. Then working with you, I decided I could do this – I really could do this. I decided to not do this and to not do that, but to really do this and to not make excuses. That was how I came a long way. I focused as you advised.”

Thus, we spent our time working together constructively, realistically focusing.

Instead of focusing on the loud voice in her head, we focused on the tasks that would realistically work with her present schedule and her goals now. Today.

Her question “exactly why am I doing this now?” remained with me after we scheduled updates and ended our time together.

This very question itself, in my opinion, will give you freedom.

Have you asked yourself this question and identified what is important?

Have you asked yourself this question on a good day – and not when events are comedy for Saturday Night Live?

I believe this is an excellent question. We take risks when we ask the question, “Why?”

Together we focused on the nutrition for the goals.

The court reporter and I made a conscious choice to create strength with training while working.

What I heard the court reporter say – and what was identified later by her words – were her fears. I heard, “I am afraid …” Her true fears were shared “straight up.”

Yes, I could hear fear in her voice, as well as the frustration.

Part I of III is posted May 1, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 1, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

This individual and I have worked together in the past. She emailed with a question requesting numerous sessions.

Again, I found it interesting that the tenacity and goals that were set by this person while enrolled in court reporting school (her words) “who would never make it out of school fast enough” were now similar to today’s scheduled session.

“I’m not going to spend another dime to improve my skills when I have paid so much to get where I am.” (I remained silent.)

“I know people can do what I am trying to do now. If they can do it, why can’t I? I want – No, I need to earn more money. I didn’t go to court reporting school to be at the bottom of a seniority list with working court reporters after this period of time, did I?” (I remained silent.)

The sentence I truly enjoyed (professionally and personally here), “I’ll just get there and take it from there when I do get there, okay?”

I listened to this gainfully employed court reporter.

“The support on my software is about to expire. I have to pay for that, too. And the support on my new writer is about to expire. More money there! All that adds up to a lot of money and it is due very, very soon!”

The reporter summed it up, “I just am wondering exactly why I am doing this now …”

And there we had it. The dancing zebra in the room was bowing and exiting.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

Part II of III is posted May 15, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

An Alpha State of Mind, Part II of III

An Alpha State of Mind, Part II of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
January 14, 2013

Part I of III began: Did you know that while your brain is in the alpha state that your muscles, nervous system, and cells have a different pulse per second?

Scientists have discovered that brain waves within the alpha state function at a different level of consciousness, perhaps half the normal rate. Did you know that?

Many of us do know that the alpha state is a “level” people seek while praying and meditating. Children who are taught how to reach alpha levels during chemotherapy have different (good) results while receiving medical treatment. Biofeedback teaches this information, too.

Beta is defined as the “level” needed to function while we are awake. Beta incorporates our five senses. Beta levels may have brain pulses which fluctuate 15 to 20 pulses per second.

A good night’s sleep requires the alpha level. Again, pulses in the brain define alpha.

Part II of III: I blinked hard, froze, and looked to the other individuals in the room. I did not reply and remained in court reporter and CART provider mode.

The professional said very slowly and with authority, “She is able to enter the alpha state quicker than other people, and while she is awake – quickly. This is her work. This is what enables her to do the excellent quality of work she is providing. She is able to focus, to focus quickly. It is her training that provides entering the alpha stage so rapidly from beta. Her alpha has been perfected – perfected – to enable her to provide her work. Other people typically remain in the beta level while they work and as they go about their day. She is in the alpha state right now, entering it easily and leaving it easily. See?”

The conversation continued verbatim, “She’s doing her work from a different place of consciousness. You (spoken to me) move quickly from beta to alpha – with alpha brain waves, which you’d have to have to have a very, very finely tuned brain working, and to be in the alpha state, very alert, very aware, listening – taking it all in. When she’s doing this type of work it is similar to meditation, to going inward.”

Everyone laughed at my non-response. I simply tilted my head, remained silent.

Yet my memory-moment (my term) caused me to leave my “alpha state of mind” and to have the three-ring circus instantly enter my head while I was working. You know the three-ring circus, yes? We have the circus parading as we realtime our work, as we listen, as we think about the grocery list, and as we wonder when the next break, the next recess, the next commercial will begin, yes?

The alpha state is just a portion of the skills, my opinion, that enables me, and I believe enables court reporters, CART providers, captioners, and students in the saddle who also focus with deep, daily “taking it all in intent.”

As my three-ring circus continued, the job continued. Individuals then discussed my breathing, my focus. I thanked the Lord it was a moment when I was not sighing, was not rolling my shoulders, was not stretching or wiggling. My stomach was not growling for food, my shoulders were not hunched up with one shoulder raised more than the other.

Part I of III is posted January 3, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 14, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 28, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

An Alpha State of Mind, Part I of III

An Alpha State of Mind, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
January 3, 2013

Part I of III: Did you know that while your brain is in the alpha state that your muscles, nervous system, and cells have a different pulse per second?

Scientists have discovered that brain waves within the alpha state function at a different level of consciousness, perhaps half the normal rate. Did you know that?

Many of us do know that the alpha state is a “level” people seek while praying and meditating. Children who are taught how to reach alpha levels during chemotherapy have different (good) results while receiving medical treatment. Biofeedback teaches this information, too.

Beta is defined as the “level” needed to function while we are awake. Beta incorporates our five senses. Beta levels may have brain pulses which fluctuate 15 to 20 pulses per second.

A good night’s sleep requires the alpha level. Again, pulses in the brain define alpha.

Alpha levels are approximately seven to fourteen pulses per second. Individuals have defined “intuition” as “a state of consciousness” arising from the alpha level.

Theta is deeper than alpha, involves dreams, and is another “level” we seek to reach during a good night’s sleep. Theta has brain frequencies approximately four to seven pulses per second.

Delta is the deepest sleep level with four pulses or less. Delta levels are documented to be “dreamless.” Many define the delta level as “unconscious” with fewer than four pulses per second. I wonder if anesthesia involves delta. I do not yet know. Yet I learned much as I listened to the conversation, the words I am sharing below.

And this relates to our court reporting field how?

During a job, professionals were discussing the human body, our ability to focus, how we focus, how we store energy, and how our body works with differing brain pulses.

While I was seated in complete listening mode, and our court reporting work posture, one of the professionals who had been speaking, looked to me and was quiet. I paused and waited and waited.

Then the professional said, “Monette, since you are a court reporter, you are able to enter the alpha stage very quickly and very deeply from the beta level. Did you know that?”

Part I of III is posted January 3, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 14, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 28, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

You All Start In CART Now, Right? Part III of III

You All Start In CART Now, Right? Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved

Part I began: An invitation to join friends (each working in college student services) for lunch with their colleagues began with introductions. I selected the restaurant, away from busy “spots” as many were new to this city.

While chewing my sandwich, a college disability coordinator, asked, “Monette, you’re a court reporter, right?” I nodded.

“Monette, you’ve provided CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) a long time, right?” … The third question was the stun-err-roo when a woman seated at our crowded table asked, “Monette, (long pause) all court reporters start in CART, right?”

I blinked hard and looked to my friends. They gave me a blank look, and I sensed this topic had already been discussed prior to this gathering.

I did not nod. I sipped my tea, tipped my head. Thinking. Thinking.

Part II began: Then they began to share, “We have found that the CART individuals now providing CART for many colleges and universities are clearly learning how to.”

I did not ask the name of companies or individuals providing CART.

This gathering was not a continuing education seminar. Nor did I want to miss the opportunity to share the wonderful services we do provide, 24/7.

I also did not ask the “visiting professionals” the questions I might have asked my friends.

I wanted to ask if they or their schools had gone with the lowest bid and was the work provided by individuals who have completed court reporting school.

I watched my friends who had invited me to this gathering. (They schedule CART for their students.)

Part III: I decided not to defend our work or to ask the above multiple questions. I was not their lunching CART consultant. (If you disagree, I wish you had been at that table.)

I know that many “coordinators” working in student services departments answer to others – yet the others are often not part of student services. Having worked in a (very) large college and private schools, I know there are often many “chiefs” – not just one.

I succinctly shared that we provide onsite and remote services. Communication with the student, scheduling department, instructor, student, and CART provider is essential. Then I smiled, picked up my sandwich, and continued eating.

Were we done?

No.

Several individuals began to discuss their “problems” and “CART beginners” they are working with now as they were still “convinced that this is where all court reporters now begin their work.”

I listened.

When I was again asked for my thoughts, I did not sigh. I did not roll my eyes.

I asked each person to write down the NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, web address and also to contact their state court reporting associations.

In unison, they replied, “We’ve never considered doing that.”

I asked that they “remember that we – court reporters, CART providers, and captioners – are trained with outstanding skills and discipline that might knock your socks off if you knew what we lived through each minute, each day to prepare us to share our professional work.”

Then I was asked if I knew where they could get cheaper notebooks “for our transcribers, students, who write on carbons for other students.” My reply? “Nope. Can’t help there.” Then I put more food in my mouth.

When the waiter brought the ticket, several lunchees (sic) gave me their cards.

As we departed, I calmly walked to my friends and quickly pinched each person.

I said, “Gee, thanks. A simple heads up or any assistance to avoid me holding a CART seminar might have been nice.”

They howled and said, “Monette, this was what they needed to hear – what we all needed to hear. Maybe you could write an article about this, so court reporters know that we, disability and student services coordinators, find there to be such a large difference in skills among the CART writers. That’s all.”

Yes, I pinched each again, maybe harder than the first pinch.

Ah, when we are enjoying a casual meal, a relaxing moment, our work may still become an opportunity for education and advocacy.

One of my positive takeaways, which I did not share with the individuals, was that I was impressed they knew the word “CART.”

They did not say “captioning” as in days of old.

Alone, I focused on the advocacy of all our years of work and thanked the Lord that the lunch was over. Oh, yes, I did.

Part I of III is posted September 1, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted September 17, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted September 29, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Thriving In Five – Or Less, Part III of III

Thriving In Five – Or Less, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I: Why thrive in five? Why thrive with less?

I believe the majority of individuals in the court reporting profession think of the number ‘five’ as a take, a 5-minute take.

Thriving in five? Yes.

Thriving in less than five? Yes, this relates, too.

Recently, I read that the average person thinks 50,000+ thoughts a day.

I smiled immediately thinking (adding to my average number of thoughts that day) that court reporters must have many more than 50,000 thoughts a day.

Our tenacious personalities, our “word” work and our “word” schooling, in my opinion, would add up to many more than the average person, yes? …

Part II: Is steno a new language? Yes. Do we learn new skills every day? Oh, yes.

Do we learn new words each day?

Yes, each and every day.

And that thrive in five mindset is a frequent flier program in our court reporting world.

We do earn frequent flier points and note skill advancement once we decide to focus on this concept.

The mindset is doable and assists us to measure our progress and our goals. It is.

Often I may ask where a court reporter is (spending time) advancing their skills?

Many professionals share that they practice after a full work day, “At home in my office.”

I may ask students, “Where do you attend school?”

A common answer, “Online in my room alone.” Hm. …

Part III: Thriving in five is a simplistic approach to find some fun (their words) – court reporting students and court reporters shared with me – when I trotted it into my tutoring and coaching time.

“Might as well try this,” some said. “It seems worth a go.”

My reply, “Now that’s the true spirit.”

I also suggest that individuals embrace their discomfort – momentarily – to isolate what is stopping or halting the advancement of skills and goals.

Thriving in five includes finding your interruption(s) focus, to isolate an interruption in your strength, and in your confidence.

Remember when you struggled on the steno machine in your new theory, your new language, writing “a cat sat on the hat?” Did you just smile?

We huffed and puffed writing those words, yes?

As a court reporter, “I absolutely can do this,” is one thought I have when the mojo is flowing.

I may also think, “This will never happen again.” Why? Because my head may be on a table or the steering wheel.

And the action that created that thought is one I truly do not ever want repeated. Not ever.

We earn many of the thoughts that cross our mind – remember I quoted the stat above for 50,000+ per day for the average person.

What are your favorite five word thrive in five possibilities?

Multiple individuals have shared this focus “is like scrabble, and I can use vowels and consonants.”

Each day we collect data in our personal and professional world.

We trust the method and the process that has successfully set us apart from the “average” person with our skills, our thoughts, and our focus.

Refine, define, and know that you are the expert.

Part I of III is posted July 13, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted July 31, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted August 8, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

“I Love You,” He Squealed, Part I of III

“I Love You,” He Squealed, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

He squealed, “I love you!” at the top of his lungs, multiple times, before he was physically removed, gently and lovingly.

How did that happen?

The morning began quietly.

While running errands I had a store coupon for 20 percent off everything in a store. At the door, I was handed another 10 percent coupon.

For three months I had been looking for a robe for my hospitalized father and thought perhaps this national store might have one.

Men’s robes are hard to find – outside of Christmas, I am learning.

Within the store that did not have men’s robe I saw huge signs. I selected three items, and with two coupons, I went to the intimates counter. (Lines are always shorter.)

A couple was at the register; a youngster played with a small, yellow truck on the carpet.

A high-back wood chair sits near the counter.

I sat in the chair for a moment with the hangers in my left hand.

The youngster said, loudly, “Papa chair!” The couple near the child gasped.

I nodded gently and said, “I’m good.” I looked to the child and in ASL, American Sign Language, I signed, “Now Baby Bear chair.”

Raised the daughter of two educators, (mother with a degree in special elementary education, brother born “special needs”), I am comfortable and often entertained by such moments.

The boy repeated “NO!!! Papa chair!”

Me, voicing softly and signing, “Was Papa chair. Now Baby Bear chair.”

He gasped, picked up his truck (put it in his mouth). Then he walked to me.

He took the truck out of his mouth and kissed my left arm – a big, messy kiss.

I paused before wiping my very wet arm. I removed the items to my right hand. The items I was holding (on sale 20 percent without the two coupons) now were suspended in the air.

Then he blew a loud, large raspberry on my arm.

That’s when the couple accompanying the child stepped in.

They were mortified. Me? Not at all.

The man said, “I’m so sorry! We’re taking him out to be around people. His parents are getting a divorce – six long months! – both are deaf. They can’t find interpreters to help them in court. The case continues to be delayed. We’re helping our daughter. She’s deaf.”

Part I of III is posted October 5, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted October 17, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted October 28, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

My Village Chief is HOH, Part I of III

My Village Chief is HOH, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I: My village chief sprinted into a parent’s hospital room wearing shorts, sandals (no socks), and a NCAA basketball T-shirt, Saturday morning.

He was all business, dressed casually. When he spoke his first two sentences, I knew. I listened and focused on the voice I know well.

When he turned his head, I saw the aid. Then, I saw the second hearing aid.

He scheduled surgery, shook our hands, left to return to (his words), “What else? NCAA playoffs. You can phone my home; here’s my number. Nothing by mouth after midnight, okay?”

My parent said, “I like him.”

The nurses, “The doctor can’t hear very well. Everyone knows he has problems on the phone.”

I had been quiet. “He has high coping skills. His hearing aids greatly assist him.”

A nurse with IVs and a bleeding cath line, “If you want to speak to him you have to speak loud.”

I said softly, “He is highly trained. Wearing two hearing aids, I have great faith in this man.”

Another nurse, “People have trouble understanding him.”

I did not roll my eyes. My parent asked (knowing I have worked with hard of hearing, HOH, and Deaf since 1993), “Do you think he can hear me, others, and operate with hearing aids?”

I smiled, “Very much so. He will do an excellent job.” The nurses remained silent.

The next morning at 7 a.m. we rolled into pre-op.

I said I would wait in the room for updates.

O.R. staff insisted that I wait in the designated surgical area.

I looked to the surgeon, “No. I’ll wait in the room for your updates.” He nodded; off they went.

Post-op the doctor sprinted into the room, “It’s much quieter in here. Thank you. Now let me tell you what happened.”

I asked if I could write medical terms he was sharing – technical terms – including “this is very bad – could kill … We have a cacophony of bad events …”

He nodded, “I know you’re a court reporter. Sure.”

I wrote new medical words. He gently corrected my spelling. I felt guided.

Then I said, “I need a village chief right now. It’s been so many months with two very ill parents. There’s so many doctors I can’t count. Many do not speak to each other as they ‘round’ giving different orders and meds. If you guide me, I’ll follow. Would you be my village chief?”

He beamed, nodded, and touched my left elbow.

Then he lowered his voice, “May I ask ‘you’ something?”

I nodded.

My village chief pointed to the TV (I had turned captions on), “I know you’re a court reporter, teacher and author; you do that.” (I had not spoken about my work.)

He paused, “Can any court reporter do that?” pointing to flawless live captions.

I ducked my head, thinking … thinking.

He leaned in to hear my answer.

“May I ask you something first?” I asked softly.

Part I of III is posted September 2, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted September 12, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted September 23, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend, Part III of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

I want to highlight and celebrate the life of a dear friend, court reporter, CART provider, and broadcast captioner.

Shelley Darlene Arthur of Vancouver, Canada, was passionate about her work, our profession, and working with deaf, HOH (hard of hearing) and animals.

No one – and I mean no one – could cover your back like Shelley Arthur.

She was a court reporter, mentor, role model, advocate, generous, enthusiastic, spirited, funny, kind, and totally committed to moments involving humans and animals. And she was so loyal to her friends and beliefs, too.

In 2000, Shelley Arthur opened Visual Voice Captions.

Shelley was Level II ASL (American Sign Language), devoted to her work with deaf and HOH.

She was also a dedicated advocate for animal rights. My favorite picture is Shelley swimming with dolphins; she wrote, “And they understand ASL!” on the caption.

As a court reporter, remote and onsite CART provider, captioner, Webcaster, and consultant, Shelley worked in the Senate of Canada, the U.S. Senate, and the United Nations.

She provided court reporting and consulting services, wrote articles, conducted seminars, and served on the BCSRA, British Columbia Shorthand Reporters Association, advisory council.

Shelley traveled (writing me detailed e-mails) to Korea, Sri Lanka, India, the Amazon Rain Forest, and World AIDS conferences in Mexico City, Kenya, and South Africa, sharing her reporting and CART skills.

Shelley was dedicated to (a sampling) Cameryn’s Cause for Kids Society; Sign Language for Children; idratherbeflying.net (Shelley recently spent two months to organize next year’s deaf pilots Fly-In); Representative Organisation of Disabled People in Europe; and International Day of Persons With Disabilities UN Enable, among others.

Shelley Arthur “coined the term ‘UN Enable’ and created their logo with the red ‘e’ in 1998” when she built their first web site. “It was a play on the negative word ‘unable’ to hopefully create controversy and bring attention. It stuck. The term ‘UN Enable’ is now used as the name of the UN global Programme on Disability, and earned a high-level URL: www.un.org/disabilities.”

I want to share the Shelly Arthur I knew.

Part III

When someone contacted me with questions, now and then, I’d e-mail Shelley.

Shelley always replied. Just ask Michelle Coffey in Ireland. Michelle and Shelley (and many others) became friends as Shelley encouraged each with her wisdom and humor.

Shelley was a detail person. She always inquired about my world and knew the names of family members.

When I had animal (and human) questions, she was a go-to person always responding with info and funny comments.

December 5th, 2009, I felt a shift. Truly. I checked my appointment calendar.

I phoned my office. I felt that I was missing something important. I asked a few people to note this “missing something important” – so I could cover my tracks.

Then I rechecked my professional and personal schedule.

When I learned Shelley Arthur died December 5th, I gasped.

At the precise moment I learned about Shelley’s passing, my dog (whom Shelley knew) ran into the room playfully nudging my leg.

This animal had never playfully placed her nose into my thigh while I was near my computer. Never.

I put my head down to digest the news, and my dog continued to playfully nudge my leg – and has not nudged me since.

I reached out to Shelley’s mother, Maureen Connelly Arthur.

Maureen wrote that they dedicated a bench in Shelley’s honor within Spirit Park on Tsolum River.

You are invited to “pause in nature with Shelley.” Donations in Shelley Darlene Arthur’s memory may be made to www.pfne.org, the National Great Pyrenees Rescue.

Maureen, Shelley’s mother, wrote that she was sending me a “small” gift.

When I opened the package, I gasped.

Maureen had chosen a necklace I often observed on Shelley.

When I first saw the necklace on Shelley I softly shared, “I have the same necklace. Before my brother Kevin died, he designed the necklace from a drawing I drew showing ‘how it should look’. The necklace broke after Kevin’s death, August 5, 2000, and it’s now in an envelope. There it remains.”

I remember Shelley giving me a hug. We smiled; no words necessary. Then we went back to work.

Each time I saw the necklace I would smile. Shelley understood.

When I opened the gift from Maureen, and saw the necklace Shelley and I had often commented upon, I had a sudden chill.

There is no way Maureen could have known how special (and unusual) that necklace was to me.

I now have Shelley’s necklace, gifted from her mother Maureen Connelly Arthur, hanging in my office.

And I wrote Maureen thanking her for confirming the unique friendship, the spiritual contract, I had with Shelley.

I now know I did miss something important December 5th, 2009 – Shelley Arthur. I am grateful for all she shared and need to say, “I really miss you, Shelley!”

Shelley’s mother may be reached: Maureen1208@telus.net

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching

http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend, Part II of III

“Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend,” Part II of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

I want to highlight and celebrate the life of a dear friend, court reporter, CART provider, and broadcast captioner.

Shelley Darlene Arthur of Vancouver, Canada, was passionate about her work, our profession, and working with deaf, HOH (hard of hearing) and animals.

No one – and I mean no one – could cover your back like Shelley Arthur.

She was a court reporter, mentor, role model, advocate, generous, enthusiastic, spirited, funny, kind, and totally committed to moments involving humans and animals. And she was so loyal to her friends and beliefs, too.

If there was a new item, a discussion, a fact – positive or perhaps not so positive to our world and to the world of animals – Shelley would write, “Did you see this? You need to read this.” “What do you think about …?” “Check this out!”

She shared her knowledge and talents with people all over the world.

Shelley Arthur had been my friend almost 14 years. We worked and played together; my life is better because of Shelley.

In 1988, Shelley Arthur became a court reporter, opening a court reporting firm. I met Shelley around 1996 when she was very involved in the CART community.

Our CART paths continued to cross and a friendship developed.

She expanded her work to include fulfilling requests and streaming text for disability and educational institutions, businesses, judicial environments, religious services, sporting events, and international arbitrations.

In 2000, Shelley Arthur opened Visual Voice Captions.

Part II

I want to share the Shelly Arthur I knew. As our friendship grew, we learned I was speaking at a convention she was attending. We had never met in person; nor had I seen a picture.

Yet I could recognize her voice from webcasting, remote CART and projects Shelley and I worked on for my company, All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc., www.artcs.com

A group was arriving to greet me at the airport. Unknown to me, Shelley rented a car, arriving early. She was good to go in jeans, petite sneakers and information she wanted to share now! Together, we met the court reporting group and had a marvelous evening.

Shelley lived with Kayla, her Pyrenees boo bear, sharing her home with Ms. Tiggy, a cat. (Shelley wrote about “Sam, the goat, who lives outdoors, staring inside.”)

She was proud to be an Air Force brat and described long transcontinental flights as a child with her sister visiting parents.

Shelley signed e-mails, “Hugs From Shelley & The Critters,” and shared events as Kayla aged to 14 years.

When Kayla deafened, Shelley communicated via sign language.

When I e-mailed, Shelley in Vancouver, she quickly responded.

Often they were snowed in, and she wrote, “but I need to walk Kayla.”

From Texas I would write, “How do you walk a large white dog when you are snowed in?”

Shelley, “First I dug out of the house. Then we walked the riverbank; Kayla saw a bird, enjoyed playing on the drifts. We’re defrosting now. It’s beautiful!”

I flew Shelley into multiple cities to work during NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, conventions within my Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs, www.CRRbooks.com, exhibit booth.

She also helped me when I conducted multiple U.S.A. and Canadian seminars.

I always knew she had my back. Always.

The morning of our first show, Shelley appeared in the exact outfit (matching top, long skirt).

Checking tags on the outfit (yes, same), I saw Shelley’s watch on her right arm – the exact antique silver bracelet watch (with two stones) I was wearing on my left arm.

People questioned if I thought this was odd. I laughed, “Not at all. We’re good.”

Shelley had a great laugh. I have memories of her chatting and laughing with court reporters, teachers, vendors, and court reporting students – bringing someone to meet me – waiting for the moment to step in and say, “Monette, you need to …”

She had such a special gift helping others.

Shelley Arthur knew Reiki healing and after 15-hour days, we would sit quietly, feet up. One evening I gifted her with a hotel full-body massage.

Later Shelley stopped by to thank me. Oh, I had never seen such a smile.

“And the male masseuse was good looking, too,” she beamed.

We would stay post-events two days to wrap-up work and unwind.

As I prepared to fly home, Shelley prepped for two days of travel to return to her Vancouver island home.

She showed me itineraries, which included (my words) big plane, small plane, tiny plane, hotel, car ride, ferry ride, ride from ferry, pick up animals, then ride home. I marveled how she thrived.

Part III is posted May 20, 2010, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend, Part I of III

“Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend,” Part I of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

I want to highlight and celebrate the life of a dear friend, court reporter, CART provider, and broadcast captioner.

Shelley Darlene Arthur of Vancouver, Canada, was passionate about her work, our profession, and working with deaf, HOH (hard of hearing) and animals.

No one – and I mean no one – could cover your back like Shelley Arthur.

She was a court reporter, mentor, role model, advocate, generous, enthusiastic, spirited, funny, kind, and totally committed to moments involving humans and animals. And she was so loyal to her friends and beliefs, too.

If there was a new item, a discussion, a fact – positive or perhaps not so positive to our world and to the world of animals – Shelley would write, “Did you see this? You need to read this.” “What do you think about …?” “Check this out!”

She shared her knowledge and talents with people all over the world.

Shelley Arthur had been my friend almost 14 years.

We worked and played together; my life is better because of Shelley.

In 1988, Shelley Arthur became a court reporter, opening a court reporting firm. I met Shelley around 1996 when she was very involved in the CART community.

Our CART paths continued to cross and a friendship developed. She expanded her work to include fulfilling requests and streaming text for disability and educational institutions, businesses, judicial environments, religious services, sporting events, and international arbitrations.

In 2000, Shelley Arthur opened Visual Voice Captions.

Shelley was Level II ASL (American Sign Language), devoted to her work with deaf and HOH.

She was also a dedicated advocate for animal rights. My favorite picture is Shelley swimming with dolphins; she wrote, “And they understand ASL!” on the caption.

As a court reporter, remote and onsite CART provider, captioner, Webcaster, and consultant, Shelley worked in the Senate of Canada, the U.S. Senate, and the United Nations.

She provided court reporting and consulting services, wrote articles, conducted seminars, and served on the BCSRA, British Columbia Shorthand Reporters Association, advisory council.

Shelley traveled (writing me detailed e-mails) to Korea, Sri Lanka, India, the Amazon Rain Forest, and World AIDS conferences in Mexico City, Kenya, and South Africa, sharing her reporting and CART skills.

Shelley was dedicated to (a sampling) Cameryn’s Cause for Kids Society; Sign Language for Children; idratherbeflying.net (Shelley recently spent two months to organize next year’s deaf pilots Fly-In); Representative Organisation of Disabled People in Europe; and International Day of Persons With Disabilities UN Enable, among others.

Shelley Arthur “coined the term ‘UN Enable’ and created their logo with the red ‘e’ in 1998” when she built their first web site. “It was a play on the negative word ‘unable’ to hopefully create controversy and bring attention. It stuck. The term ‘UN Enable’ is now used as the name of the UN global Programme on Disability, and earned a high-level URL: www.un.org/disabilities.”

Part II of III is posted May 10, 2010, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Monette’s Mindful Management: Lose Him? Part 2

Mindful management is a term I share when I’m coaching, tutoring and assisting professionals and students with test prep. I desire to share mindful management moments with you.

Monette’s Mindful Management: Lose Him? Part 2

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I was posted on Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com, www.crrbooks.com and www.mylegal.com

That “Lose Him!” candle (discussed in Part I) truly sparked discussion.

Who would buy such a candle? How does one earn a candle from a friend — or foe?

Would such a candle simply be left in a “handy” location or carefully placed next to a coffee cup to avoid embarrassing the gifter gifting the giftee?

How does this relate to mindful management?

Messages come in all shapes and sizes.

Now we target this message and “Lose It!” within our professional and personal world.

We have resolutions (and deals) we made with others and with ourselves, right?

We’re not out of the month of January, yet individuals roll their eyes, laugh or sigh when someone asks how those New Year’s 2010 resolutions are surviving.

I desire to ask: What would you lose?

To narrow the field, we should hone “what would we lose?” to what we are paid to lose (work related), and what we desire to lose at home (paper, files, clutter, old technology items, etc.) And let’s put diets in this discussion as many people want to lose pounds, right?

When you have the list created for what it is you want to lose, then focus that quest to location – your office, home, garage, desk, refrigerator, closets, your waist, etc.

The real deal in “Lose It!” and what is it we really want to lose is, in my opinion, in the consistency of how we integrate this action into our world.

When people ask what I would like to lose, I softly reply that I want to lose people (only as an example) who say, “I don’t have time to take seminars or finish (fill in the blank) — I’ll take less money to learn – while working. Then I can charge more.” (I always blink.)

Recently, I was asked to take $2.00 less per hour to have the opportunity to provide professional work. No joke.

It’s not that hard to act on the “Lose It!” commitment once your focus is there.

Make a decision, give the decision a little leeway, then consistently act on your goal regarding that decision.

As an example, people I work with while coaching, tutoring and test prep tell me they want to lose time wasters, working on repetitive tasks without improving job and/or personal skills, the ability to — (okay, take a deep breath) — accept work at a fee where one truly believes they should be compensated – vs. – taking the lowest dollar number to “get” that job.

We identify first, then we isolate to lose the action, mindset, thought, activity second.

Once you look at the “lose it” list with a different view, you start to focus your day and also while cruising the grocery store with your half-empty grocery cart.

The focus is in the decision to act.

You make the decision moment by moment with mindful management – at work, at the gym, while shopping and preparing for a great night’s sleep. You focus.

You selectively lose actions, items, experiences — yes, people — and your life will change.
You will quickly notice a difference.

“Lose Him?, Part 3” will be published – when? On Valentine’s Day, February 14th.

Now you choose. Mindful management: What do you need? What do you want to lose?

Mylegal.com Contributing Editor, Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, may be reached at www.CRRbooks.com and www.ARTCS.com for customized coaching and test prep.

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal
Motivation Management & Life Coach,
Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR or a state court reporting exam? I want to help you and others to pass your test and to exceed career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivation skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Communication skills and daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and coaching?

• Veteran court reporters, CART providers and captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re falling behind or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students or veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters and captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with one or two key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check It Out: Reach Your Goals! Tutoring and Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit can help you achieve at much high levels. Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life? Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:

As a 25+year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material and an instructor, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, students and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

You, Ken-Tu, And The Mockingbird, Part III of III

You, Ken-Tu, And The Mockingbird, Part III of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I in this series was posted October 9, 2009, link: http://www.monettebenoit.com/2009_10_08_archive.html

Part II was posted October 13, 2009, link: http://www.monettebenoit.com/2009_10_13_archive.html

Later, I heard the garage open; my husband does not immediately enter. When he did, this husband was ‘not’ happy.

He slowly (perhaps to contain anger?) asked, “Did you know the mockingbird was in the garage when I pulled my car in?”

Me: “WHAT!?”

Husband: “Yes, dear, it was in, flying all over the garage.”

Me: “That can’t be. I left the garage door just cracked.”


He: “Then that bird followed Ken-Tu. Ken-Tu was lying on his towel licking himself. The bird was flying into the walls and the ceiling. When I opened the door, it became trapped within the small space between the garage door and ceiling.”

Me: “WHAT!?”


He: “Yes, then – I had to get a broom.”

Me: “WHAT!?” (I could not keep a straight face.)


He: “The bird was frantic. It was throwing itself around, hurting itself.”

Me: “Really???”


He: “So, I had to use the broom, open the door to the side yard, move the mower and yard equipment, and sweep that bird out the side door – not an easy job – as it became more frantic.”

Me: “Maybe that bird will move? Where’s Ken-Tu?”


He: “Asleep in the garage. What the hell were you thinking?”

Ken-Tu moved to the dining room and began pre-emptive screaming. If something looked at him, Ken-Tu screamed.

And the dog? You don’t want to know.

Soon Ken-Tu moved into the bedroom. Woah, daddy! Did spit and hair fly.

But as life rolled itself forward, events calmed down. Ken-Tu now spends his time in the dead armadillo pose under our CD player.

As we prepare for the holidays, I wish you great peace and the ability to laugh at some of your/our silliness. I know ‘you-ken-tu’ grow from life’s lessons.

The day before I submitted this series, Chicos died in my arms. I desire to share with you that I continue to learn multiple lessons from this one question: “Is my life better from this experience?”

My answer today is ‘yes’ regarding Chicos and Ken-Tu.

And the mockingbird? It’s back – singing, perched on our garage roof.

Now I ask you, “What makes your experiences and your life lessons better?”

Part I and Part II were posted www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com


			

You, Ken-Tu, And The Mockingbird, Part II of III

You, Ken-Tu, And The Mockingbird, Part II of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I was posted October 8, 2009, and linked: http://www.monettebenoit.com/2009_10_08_archive.html


That afternoon – just prior to bringing the cat ‘in’ from the outdoors – my husband went to the store. Upon each return, I know he usually rushes in with the groceries. In my worry that my husband would trip over Ken-Tu (who was passionately vaulting head first into the laundry door to get back into the garage) – I opened the laundry room door to avoid a collision with my husband and this cat.

Thus, silliness begins.

Ken-Tu sprinted through the garage to the front yard. My husband stopped, his arms loaded with groceries. I immediately went after Ken-Tu, but I’m not as fast as the mockingbird living in our front yard. (Within the garage, Ken-Tu stood on a car roof looking through the window at that bird.)

Immediately, the mockingbird began diving Ken-Tu’s head with its beak first. I headed for ‘escaped’ cat, avoiding all eye contact with my husband.

The cat darts for cover – in the neighbor’s large hedges. Husband was cussing. It’s Texas hot; he immediately departed for Lowe’s – “to return later.” Husband simply drove off and did not look back.

With my arms outstretched, I call Ken-Tu. The mockingbird never dove for me but flushed the cat out of hedges. The cat scampered, low to the ground – crossing into my yard, and went under our hedges. As I tried to retrieve this cat, Ken-Tu accurately swatted me.

In realtime, I remember that the neighbors might be watching – I’m in my short shorts bent over this cat in my front yard. I can just imagine someone saying, “Yes, and she hit that kitty.” (No one could see the scratches ‘leaking’ small amounts of blood.)

I refrained from hitting the cat, which was swinging overhand with two paws after he rolled in dirt around all hedges.

I refocused on trying to coax cat back into our garage – until my meter goes off – and then I’m done.

I lowered the garage door to the height a cat could return to his food. Done. I returned into house. The kung-fu kitty was on its own.

Soon, I feel guilty; I sit in a chair within garage, reading my JCR, NCRA, Journal of Court Reporting, calling Ken-Tu until ‘that’ becomes silly. I can tell exactly where Ken-Tu was because of the mockingbird shrieks. That bird was working to injure that cat – feathers flew.

Part II and Part III will be posted www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette's Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re "stuck" and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette's Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

You, Ken-Tu, And The Mockingbird, Part I of III

You, Ken-Tu, And The Mockingbird, Part I of III

By Monette Benoit, All rights reserved.


Well, some days are not dull. I swear my life could be a sitcom. This is only one gem when silliness seemed to unfold at record pace.

I view many life lessons as I read forums and e-mails from court reporters and students. Respectfully, I share my life lesson below.

My sister-in-law appeared with nephews and skateboarding teens. She needed help closing her car’s trunk because the key had broken inside the lock. (Schools were closed for the swine flu.

Locally, skateboarding kids gathered in ‘teen pods’ [my term] – pretending to cough on each other, while laughing at adults.) That is the moment a cat appeared from the heavens on her car roof as we worked to help her close the trunk, so she could drive home.

In the driveway, a nephew gasped and pointed, “Hey! Where did that cat come from? It catapulted from the sky!”

The cat was bleeding with multiple fresh wounds on both sides of its neck and back.

Then the cat raced into our garage. It parked and sat with its front paws pointed ‘to’ the spot where my husband said a few hours earlier, had said, quote, “I wish I could do something about that mouse in the garage!”

That night, the cat placed a warm, dead mouse near my feet. How do I know? I picked it up.

I named the cat Ken-Tu. He did not understand any words except “stop that.”

I spoke to him saying, “You-ken-tu” and “He-ken-tu” as I observed the cat, considered adopting this wounded animal. Perhaps someone was missing their pet?

The vet shared Ken-Tu is eight years old and had been “homeless at least one year – possibly more, based upon deformed ears, ear mites and bulbous tumor that exploded, creating a cauliflower ear.” Ken-Tu ‘healed’ in the garage (post a huge vet bill).

Years ago, I volunteered with the St. Vincent de Paul Society, SVDP, as a caseworker. I also volunteered to assist in the initial organization of a new animal shelter (rescuing wild and abandoned animals) and a new women’s shelter. I learned many lessons.

Each event was a teacher, to me. I filled my car many times for families, children, rest homes and hospitals. We helped a wide area. I then delivered donations and offerings to individuals and churches.

The weekend I’m documenting, I was assisting my cat Chicos, a special spirit, who was in kidney failure for eight months. I softly teased people that I was the hand-maiden who shared food in syringes and “closed the deal.” (We have rituals; cats love rituals.) I administered IV subcu fluids, as needed; Chicos and I were rounding another one-way corner.

The court reporters and students whom I privately tutor and coach reached out to me. I know Chicos’ life was extended as others shared their experiences and their wisdom.

Soon on a Sunday, we decided to bring Ken-Tu into our humble house, which already had two cats and one 70-pound, two-year old dog (all rescued animals). Ken-Tu was in the laundry room, snarling as needed. At 17 pounds – our ‘starving kitty’ was a force. (Because of abuse – with little provocation – he swung overhand.)

Part II and Part III will be posted www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette's Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re "stuck" and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette's Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Real-Time Rules And The Good Old Days, Part IV

Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days, Part IV

By Monette Benoit
Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part IV in IV

Some of us have felt the realtime technical squeeze, holding our breath, as those of you who graduate realtime-ready – geared to go – may step right into a spot we could not envision.

Yet experienced and beginning realtime court reporting professionals are making their mark, producing verbatim records, recording history.

Court reporters, CART providers, broadcast captioners, and end-users with the savvy to stay on top of technical advances have guided (okay, dragged a few of us) many into a new era.

Deaf were the first to use pagers as hand-held tools. This astounded me in 1993 when I began realtiming to a large screen for St. Francis Di Paola’s Catholic deaf mass in San Antonio, Texas (praying to get better “quicker”).

We – early realtime writers – invented conflict-free strokes, phoned friends long distance (remember ‘long distance’?) to ask, “What about this …?”

I was routinely told consumers who are Deaf (not hard-of-hearing) led the paths for much of our communication equipment.

We, wordsmiths, are goal-focused and busy. We may simply look up and wonder what the fuss is about. Yet Deaf individuals were communicating in realtime much earlier than ‘hearing’.

How does this relate to Realtime Rules?

Techs, consumers, end-users and information managers know technology will continue. They remind me their goals are to push forward.

Individuals in global one-room apartments and garages are working on becoming the next huge company.

Court reporters and captioners remember specific events as memories; others read or listen to history. We now have a seat together – listening and preparing for future moments.

If you’re feeling Realtime Rules pressure, perhaps it’s time to look up and see how far this profession has come in the past few decades. Boy, howdy, have we evolved. I ended my June column, the third article in this “Realtime Rules” series, with “Lemonade, anyone?”

Court reporters continue to master the skill of thriving where excellence is requested and needed. We are powerful.

Realtime Rules means taking advantage of our technology and preserving huge opportunities. The bottom line is that we are essential in today’s economy.

Perhaps it is up to us to calculate the top-of-the-line, realtime-rules readiness, and deliverance in a national shortage.

I want you to remember that you are important. Realtime is now the good old days. Professionals will continue to motor forward. Others will take bite-sized pieces. The choice is yours.

So how will you reach out, then up? Focus your court reporting compass; concentrate and harness your strengths. You are the master of your path and our future.

Part I, II and III in “Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days” may be found on www.Monettebenoit.com

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA.

She is the author of multiple books and Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, Companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Your Dictionary CD Software Program series.

Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, real-time court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist. She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals. Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: http://www.artcs.com/

Real-Time Rules And The Good Old Days, Part III

Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days, Part III

By Monette Benoit
Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part III in IV

Realtime rules: we now have organizations, companies, sign interpreters, and deaf and hard-of-hearing consumers who routinely consider us as part of a team, requesting to work with us.

Reporters who currently take equipment to a job, set up without real-time and produce records, post event, often are requested less (and paid less). Why should someone wait ten days to receive any record when professionals hand a rough ASCII, deliver a realtime transcript or captioning file at the end of the job, on air, or after any class instruction?

In 1999 I realtimed Latin classes for a university student. There were moments when I paused, as each class ended, prior to handing an instant verbatim copy of the class to the consumer. This was university Latin. Yet this was my job. Some days I handed the ASCII overhand with a smile. Other days I simply handed the ASCII without comment (or smile) as we advanced into Latin studies. We were a great team. Clear communication was the focus and thus, we did.

“Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days” is continued on www.Monettebenoit.com

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA.

She is the author of multiple books and Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, Companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Your Dictionary CD Software Program series.

Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, real-time court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist. She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals. Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: http://www.artcs.com/

Real-Time Rules And The Good Old Days, Part II

Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days, Part II

By Monette Benoit
Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part II in IV

The good old days some people chat about is when court reporters were paid more. Really? Maybe. Maybe.

There were (limited) ‘x’ number of courts, ‘x’ number of positions for reporters in jurisdictions, courthouses, venues and firms (run by court reporters). When numbers were met (typically by males in really old days) we often were wait-listed.

Remote work was not a conceivable idea. Traveling (on the road by car) was typical for beginners. Many court reporters worked to avoid traveling. (I did travel – never a dull moment – without cell phones, a challenge for single women.)

The good old days stenotype of work typically was court, freelance depositions, FBI, CIA, United Nations, government or state agencies. The plethora of categories we now see were not possibilities. Captioning, CART, TTY, remote financial calls? What’s that?

No tape backup was another standard. Many states outlawed tape recorders. I was warned, “If you have it on you, you will be arrested. Why would you need it?”

When I relocated to Miami and was instructed to purchase a tape recorder for my first assignment, a federal magistrate and international maritime appeal with multiple lawyers and multiple expert witnesses (oh joy), I thought they were joking. I had never been permitted to use a tape recorder in any other venue (many). Prior to court, I was accompanied to a store to ‘buy’ a $79.99 General Electric recorder – a huge dent in my food budget.

Remarkable moments also include numbering steno pads for the steno machine. (We documented flap numbers when witnesses began and finished.) We had to handwrite ‘flap’ number on the top of each page of each steno pad (300 turns to a pad), so we readback “faster without taking up time” to do our job. This was required. Mornings were spent flipping pages, pen in hand, before work began.

Research? Not by Internet. We used large books and telephone. We became very good friends with telephone operators, research university librarians, and pharmacists in teaching hospitals.

We learned to juggle the telephone with long cord in one hand (no headsets back then), book on one knee, slim steno pad on other knee, to accurately produce a verbatim record. Case files, documents and exhibits (which varied) were additional items for the desk or chair on which we sat.

We now access information by pushing buttons, work with IMs, instant messaging (another wonder tool) sharing information and real-time with consumers and peers. We display text to large screens, small screens or to straw huts across the globe.

“Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days” is continued on www.Monettebenoit.com

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA.

She is the author of multiple books and Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, Companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Your Dictionary CD Software Program series.

Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, real-time court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist. She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals. Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: http://www.artcs.com/

Real-Time Rules And The Good Old Days, Part I

Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days, Part I

By Monette Benoit
Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I in IV

My series on “Realtime Rules” touched a nerve. Professionals and students have written how this column’s thread “spoke to me” and “motivated me.” When someone has been spoken to and motivated, that is a good moment for me. Each time I am humbled as a court reporter, CART provider, instructor and coach.

The students and court reporters I work with know well my quote, “Huge steps are taken one at a time.”

Now I want to explore Realtime Rules and reach out, then up. Many reporters speak about the ‘good old days’ during coaching. Students comment upon this during tutoring.

Here’s the way I see it – my opinion – when reminiscing about reporting good old days: That was then, this is now.

Though students believe our schooling was shorter (not entirely accurate), easier (not entirely accurate), and cheaper (okay, maybe that’s true), the fact is the education of court reporting students often was shorter. Many states, including Texas, had a graduation long ago of 175 words per minute. Oh, I can just hear “What!!?” from here as many states, including Texas, now graduate and test graduates at 225 words per minute.

Students enrolling in school were different, too, and were often dedicated to full-time attendance (not working part-time and fulfilling family responsibilities). In short, many attended school, then returned to a dorm or home. That was our job.

Equipment was manual, not computerized; pricing was different (lower). My first machine, which was new: $150.00.

Looking back to the good old days before computers, when the prices of mainframes were above $30,000 and firm owners rented time to reporters to produce the official record, we see typewriters.

We remember carbons and painstakingly – page by page – correcting errors and then praying we did not make another error on that page. Pages were occasionally tossed into the air. Then we retyped that entire page with carbons, building the transcript page by page. We’re talking title, appearance, exhibit, certification and all Q&A pages. Then we bound the transcript. I was instructed to use a hammer to secure the staples, so people did not get staple-cuts. It worked, and hammering the transcripts was a favorite part of the final job as we worked on a hard wood table and swung that hammer overhand as instructed.

“Realtime Rules And The Good Old Days” is continued on www.Monettebenoit.com

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA.

She is the author of multiple books and Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, Companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Your Dictionary CD Software Program series.

Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, real-time court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist. She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals. Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: http://www.artcs.com/

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part V of VII

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part V of VII

By Monette Benoit
All Rights Reserved.

Every day, like you, I receive e-mails. People contact me each day as a court reporter, CART provider, instructor, tutor, and author of NCRA, written knowledge test, “WKT” test prep material. Like you, I’m working to ensure we have an accurate record and to give back. My goal is to serve others.

Sometimes I receive an e-mail stinger. I may “see” frustration; I may address that.

But there are many e-mails where I giggle. I understand we’re working hard, probably too hard.

Today’s goal: If this article gifts you with new information, a smile, a giggle, ending with my “memory-moment,” I’ll have done my job — today — for tomorrow.

You can embrace this technology, become embraced by a new world; one that expands each day, as we share our skills, listening to those who teach us – our consumers.

Please refer to my NCRA JCR online articles within the CART Special Interest Area (members only, per NCRA) for previous questions and answers.

To further assist you, part I, II, III, IV and V and many articles that I’ve written about my experiences with CART and deaf/Deaf and HOH (hard of hearing) topics are online at http://www.catapultdix.com/ and Monette’s Musings, http://www.monettebenoit.com/

30. “What is oral deaf? Does that mean they talk clearly, but can’t hear?”

The person is deaf and does not sign. A person chooses not to use sign language. If you’re new to CART, it’s not “aural” deaf. While the audience giggles, reporters blush if they were not aware of the phrase beforehand.

31. “Why would they choose not to sign?”

A person with hearing loss may choose to read lips. The age at which hearing loss begins is an important factor in the choice. Some oral deaf may become deaf early in life. A parent helps with the decision, perhaps with a teacher, doctor or audiologist. Most oral deaf that I know made the decision with their mother.

I know a very successful (high profile) businessman who refuses to learn sign or read lips, asking others “to write it down.” (He hands me his paper and pencil each time.)

I asked why he didn’t read lips or sign. He answered, “I don’t want to.”

I threw my head back and laughed.

Others were horrified that I had even asked this question. But I had an opportunity to engage in a wonderful, honest conversation; I learned a lot from the gentleman. And the moment that was missed by almost everyone who was standing there when I initially asked my question was he thanked me for asking. After he shared, he leaned over, shook my hand and thanked me. I tapped his shoulder and gently nodded. I get it.

Many oral deaf make the decision early in their deafness to try to get along without sign.

The Deaf worlds are very different from oral deaf: this culture of individuality and its social and professional settings often help to define the decision. Yet the majority of my oral-deaf friends do not know any sign. Since I can tease them, as they tease me, I may sign, as we chat, “turning voice-box off.” (Voice-box is an important term to know and to have in your vocabulary.)

Again, one’s knowledge and acceptance within deaf culture will enhance and/or halt this truth in communication.

32. “I’m interested in CART. How can I learn?”

Seminars are held at state and national conventions. CARTWheel was organized by Gayl Hardeman to act as a guidepost for families and people with hearing challenges. The site (www.CARTWheel.cc) has grown with a group of leaders, pioneers and professionals who share information among professional members, apprentice members, and within legal, educational, religious and business arenas. NCRA has a CART Special Interest Area at cart.NCRAonline.org.

Read articles, prep, read, and get to know thee consumer.

You will be thanked and will learn buckets of information at the feet of the masters. This community has been wonderful embracing me – the Deaf, deaf, oral deaf, hard of hearing. Truly. Since 1993, from the trenches, I am thanked over and over for simply bearing witness and for serving to their needs, to their requests. I do not work to define what ‘they’ need without consulting with ‘they’ — as it should be.

33. “I have a job just waiting for me to CART. If I can learn how much to charge, the job’s there, so I need you to tell me how much to charge, so I can provide this service.” Another question: “I’m looking to CART/ caption on the side. I need national rates. Break it down by one-on-one or group rates – that’d be good to know, too.”

Each reporter needs to know the community. One CART provider often writes longer periods of time than team sign interpreters, and we may share an ASCII disk, verbatim translation of the job request.

Amounts vary for our services, but I can pick up the phone, learning rates in any region. So should you, after learning the culture(s) in your area.

34. “Help! You need to phone me at (long distance) tomorrow around 9 or 10. I need advice to handle clients and lots of other stuff. I’ve attended many of your sessions on CART when you spoke at the national convention. My e-mail doesn’t work, please call!”

Hmmm. I replied, via e-mail that “doesn’t work,” but was sent via e-mail: I don’t know your time zone, state, full name, qualifications or enough specifics to be helpful.

35. “I’m interested in starting a CART business. Do you own one? I need to pick someone’s brain!” Please see previous 34 questions and answers.

36. “Can you provide me with all your fees, including all marketing plans?”

Gee, I don’t think so.

I end here, in serious times, sharing a Deaf joke. “It’s funny when you get a prank call through TTY (telephone for the Deaf) and try to figure out who the caller is by speed of typing, choice of words and English language.”

Those that understand Deaf culture just smiled. If I need to explain this, it’s not funny.

Come, join us; you’ll smile, promise. My “filled with wonder” memory was gifted from a Big-D friend.

I cherish the honesty, so pure: “Monette, you see why friendship means so much? You know how people say earthly treasures don’t matter cause you can’t have them in heaven? Well, I will get to also have them in heaven.”

“I want to talk with Jesus. I think that will be one cool conversation. Hey, I will get to talk to Him verbally, and He can talk to me normal there, ’cause I will get to hear there. Yup, that will definitely be such a cool thing.”

Thanks for permitting me to share moments that pause my world to sparkle with wonder at what tomorrow may bring.

And I humbly ask each of you: Do you have wonder and excitement in your work?

CART opens new doors and opportunities each day. Truly.

And yes, you have my permission to share my articles. One set of ears, one set of hands at a time. And I still swear learning theory was the hardest thing I ever did. Placing the steno machine on the tiny tripod comes in a close second.

About the Author:

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part III of VII

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part III of VII
By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part III, Falling On Deaf Ears, continues sharing CART FAQs, comments and facts that consistently cross my path.

Part I and II may be accessed http://www.catapultdix.com/ and www.monettebenoit.com

Responses from my articles continue to arrive.

And, I kindly share, the following are questions I work to address, each pro bono as people move forward with their careers.

To further assist you, many articles that I’ve written about my experiences in the trench with CART and deaf topics are online at http://www.catapultdix.com/

20) “Where do you apply to provide CART?”

That depends on where your skills and goals are. If you want to write for an educational setting, the school administration and disability offices are a great place to begin to advertise services once you are qualified.

Official reporters in courtrooms do not practice, they intern.
Qualified court reporters provide professional services as do qualified CART providers.

I strongly advise people to gather skills before they go out. Please do not go into situations, accepting professional fees for professional services, then begin to practice. Sadly, word spreads (real) fast among our community and others; reporters regretted that decision, in hindsight – always.

21) “What does it pay?”

You need to determine the level of work. How long is the commitment? One day or 12 weeks? Many factors play into the fee that you request.

I encourage people to attend national conventions, meet people and “ask ‘em.” You’d be surprised at what you learn. (And why would someone, your competitor, share with you in your backyard? Good business would be to go and meet new professionals and also new consumers.)

22) “How steady is the work? Yearly average, please.” (Honest, this was the question.)

That depends. See the above questions for this article and past two.

If a CART provider has gathered information, formed liaisons with the communities of Deaf, deaf, hard-of-hearing, etc., they won’t ask questions like that. You learn. I was told. I am still told. Sometimes it’s funny.

Our experiences, as an official and/or freelance reporter, have not leant themselves to our clearing our throats, saying, “I need …”

But in this field, when people discovered what I was earning, I received e-mails, TTY calls (telephones deaf and HOH people use) from people telling me to adjust (raise) my rates.

Sometimes I wasn’t sure if I should be offended that my rates seemed to be posted in kitchens, but if you truly become part of these communities, they become protective.

Consumers (they) do not want you to burn out and get upset you are not able to earn a living.

They’ll do much of the bargaining for you. Hard to believe if you’re still an official and/or depo reporter; this I know.

But the people who sit (my term) ‘thigh-by-thigh,’ truly want you to grow with technology and to remain available “as their ears.”

23) “Why do you do this and not depositions?” See above answer(s).

Has any attorney ever asked you to raise your rates?

Has anyone ever attended a meeting to raise money to ensure that you can provide the professional services you choose to share?

Each time I’m hugged, e-mailed, receive gestures of kindness, I feel the tug in my heart; I have that “ah-ha!” moment. There’s not enough money at this time for me to do a deposition.

I am delighted we have so many professionals providing many great services.

I choose this, working with my consumers (not clients/defendants/plaintiffs), knowing I have to write the correct word within two-seconds — knowing I’ll get that hug, thank you, often teary eye of a child or seasoned professional, who shares deep from within their heart. That’s why.

It’s wonderful to have choices; I intend to take my choices … as they come to me.

24) “What do I tell people who say my skills will not be needed due to voice and or advancing technology?” Great question.

My sincere reply to students, reporters, professionals within and outside our field (to everyone): “Obviously others have not done their research and gathered all the facts that show, in fact, our discipline as reporters ensures we will move with technology, wherever it takes us!” And I really believe that.

Reporters survive a 92 percent flunk rate to graduate from court reporting school.

We are tested each day at rates over 95 percent accuracy to advance in our schooling.

The ability to survive is a challenge, but the tenacity we earn, the orientation to fulfilling our expected tasks, that’s a discipline others do not have.

That’s the difference of a professional who will move ‘with’ technology.

We’re no different than any other profession. We will have challenges, and it’s up to us to address those challenges as a group and individually.

Last night my father was discussing technology and his role in a high school in the 1960s, using punch cards. He said, “Much of the past is similar to buggy-whippers.”

I giggled, “What part’s that? And what’s a buggy-whipper?”

Emmett, my dad said, “That was a full-time job. When there were no buggies or horses, those buggy-whippers were jobless.”

As he continued to discuss how he acted as a “human computer,” holding punch cards up to the light (11 p.m. to 4 a.m. when the school rented blocks of computer time) to see where a student’s classes were and at what level, I had my ‘memory moment’ (deaf phrase).

I thought, “Yeah, I get it.”

Emmett was also the first person to place a high school on computer, then working with IBM. When I ask why he did this, and how he foresaw this possibility, he smiles.

He still replies matter of fact, “I was seeking to keep my job in a field that was filled with an abundance of qualified teachers. I knew I had to do something different, and this was it for me — then.”

His father, my grandfather, delivered milk (he rose from a 4th grade education and became a self-made professional).

My father worked as a teacher and guidance counselor (psychologist, soicial worker, medic), expanding his skills as a (truly) “human computer.”

He’s now relating technology, referring to buggy-whippers, laughing with his daughter, a court reporter, tutor, teacher, realtime CART provider.

We have so much, so very much more to offer.

If we keep our chins up, work together and share, we will amaze — even ourselves.

And yes, you have my permission to share my articles. One set of ears, one set of hands at a time. And I still swear ‘learning theory’ was the hardest thing I ever did.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part II of VII

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part II of VII
By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part II, Falling On Deaf Ears, continues sharing CART FAQs, comments and facts that consistently cross my path. Part I may be accessed http://www.catapultdix.com/ and Monette’s Musings, http://www.monettebenoit.com/

To further assist you, many articles that I’ve written about my experiences with CART and ‘deaf’ topics are online at http://www.catapultdix.com/

10) “How long did it take you to build your dictionary?”

This is a process. When we stop “building,” we retire from the technical world in which we live. When I began the religious realtime in 1993, I devoted six months to writing and globaling terms.

My alarm rang at 4:30 a.m. to squeeze ‘in’ one hour each morning. (I was exhausted, but knew my life was shifting each day. I felt the ‘pull’ and knew it deep within my heart.)

At the time, I was teaching full-time court reporting speed and academic classes (day and night shifts), was finishing my B.B.A., bachelor degree at Northwood University distance learning program and continued to tutor, expanding the products, books and CDs within CRR Books & CDs.

I created an additional goal of 30 minutes each evening … even if that meant staring at my steno machine across the living room. The goal was to incorporate ‘building’ into my structure. Once it became a habit, it was easier to find the time, and the challenge was to improve my skills. The challenge still continues.

11) “What accuracy do you write?”

The best I can each and every time. Learning to fingerspell dramatically improved my skills. I tease people that I spent two semesters fingerspelling university-level Latin. Knowing what is, and is not, in your dictionary, fingerspelling without hesitation, and ‘balancing’ a sense of humor is essential in this work, I believe.

12) “Do you write verbatim?”

Now don’t blast me if you think you know this answer. But this depends on my audience (one-to-one or one-to-many), the technical level of the job, what is or isn’t in my dictionary. I try to always write verbatim, but if there is a word that is used repeatedly, I can fingerspell it or I can modify the word. Having worked in courtrooms and depositions, I know there’s a fine-line to what is not verbatim.

13) “Why would you not write verbatim?”

If my consumer is learning challenged and/or disabled, if their vocabulary comprehension falls short of the level being discussed, I may need to shift my writing. When I write on a screen versus on a laptop and/or TV for one or a few, I assess each situation from the view of the consumer and the job for which I have been hired.

But if the consumer points and asks ‘what is that word,’ I have a responsibility within the role that I am providing to assist that person. If a person is Big D (Big Deaf), their English syntax is different. Often they have sign interpreters, but if the group doesn’t want to pay for an interpreter and a CART provider, you will find yourself in a role where you may need to shift how you write.

To prevent problems, I inquire about the consumer, speakers and topics before the ‘event’ to gain insight as to what may ‘pop’ up during the course of a job. And if I’m ‘up’ on a screen, the role is very different. Often I ask the person to write the word on a piece of paper; I answer their question(s) after the speakers are finished. (I prefer to answer their question on paper, if I can, to avoid embarrassing the consumer.)

14) “I keep hearing about writing environmental sounds. How much should a CART provider write?”

I have taken the stance that if I can hear it, and can get it on the screen without altering the message, I write it. I am ‘their’ ears. Samples: dogs barking (“hearing dogs” at work), stomach gurgling (if everyone is laughing, consumers should share in that moment also), rain hitting window, birds chirping (that one still draws tears), garbage truck dumping trash, baby hiccupping and crying, helicopter overhead, etc. If people comment and/or make eye gestures regarding any sounds, I try to include the description with parenthesis around the word(s).

15) “Do you think CART will grow?” Yes.

16) “How do you handle working with sign interpreters?”

Become a team. Feed them. More teams are created around food … truly. It’s a common joke that if you want deaf people to come to an event, feed them. The same is true for interpreters and CART providers.

17) “How do you know what the consumers need?”

This answer is similar to “location, location, location.” Ask. Ask. Ask them.

Recently I was in a room with hard-of-hearing and deaf people. CART was going to be provided. A sign interpreter approached, asking me if I wanted her to sign the presentation, which was being realtimed to a large screen. I paused, saying, “Gee, I don’t know. CART has been prepared as ‘the’ communication; I wouldn’t be able to pay for it myself.” The interpreter said, “That’s okay. If someone wants it, I’d be happy to sign.”

I approached the experienced CART provider, explaining the request. The verbatim reply, “No, not now…” I gasped – standing in front of a large room with an audience already seated.

As I slowly turned to the interpreter who heard the verbatim reply, the interpreter signed to the deaf, asking the consumer directly.

The request was accepted by the consumer, the person needing the communication. The interpreter then placed her chair next to the realtime monitor. The interpreter signed; more than one deaf person watched both the monitor and the interpreter.

What did I learn (again)? Ask. Ask. Ask ‘them’. And the CART provider who had said, “No, not now,” – I bowed my head because I did not agree – at all, but was not in a position to change the direct request to the consumer by the sign interpreter.

The matter was handled with the consumer’s needs addressed by the interpreter. Hard-of-hearing who had come to the event watched the screen. This consumer watched the sign interpreter and the screen.

18) “Who should I look at when I’m speaking to a deaf person and an interpreter is signing?”

Great question. I still have to concentrate and focus on the face of the deaf person. When I forget or continue to watch the interpreter, I am (nicely) refocused. The interpreter is speaking, signing for the deaf person; they ‘are in role’.

19) “What’s the funniest thing that’s ever happened to you?”

Well, that continues to evolve. This is just a sampling of a small comical moment – they occur all the time when you are truly in the trench.

During the NCRA midyear convention in San Antonio, I attended the NCRF Fundraiser. My guest was Laney Fox, a deaf teen for whom I have realtimed. I hired an interpreter, Molly Sheridan, (Texas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, TCDHH, Level IV) to interpret the Saturday evening with Wayne Lee, a certified hypnotist.

As we were standing in line, a person approached from behind saying, “excuse me,” several times to Laney’s back. (She wanted a napkin from the counter.) I smiled, watched. Eventually, I said, “She’s deaf (pointing to Laney). The person said, “I’m soooo sorry.” I tapped Laney and Molly’s shoulder. They asked, “What’s so funny?” I said, “She’s sorry you’re deaf.” We ‘all’ laughed. This happens a lot. Hearing people often talk to the back of a deaf or HOH person … not knowing.

Interpreters approach new clients from behind, saying the name of the person they are seeking. When one person doesn’t turn around, bingo, that’s the client.

Remember I said ‘the’ sense of humor ‘is’ important. I have a deaf friend who will go to hotel lobbies and play the piano. No-one knows he is deaf. He smiles and nods as people speak ‘to’ him. The first time I saw this, I held my ribs to stop from howling. His sincerity, eye contact, was so ‘pure,’ as each person ‘spoke’ to him. We have much to learn from each deaf and HOH person … much indeed.

You have my permission to photo, add, delete, share. And there will be a Part III. Maybe this series could be renamed to “Falling on Hearing Ears” one day. With your involvement, we can make ‘this’ a possibility. One set of ears, one set of hands at a time. And I still swear ‘learning theory’ was the hardest thing I ever did.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part I of VII

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part I of VII
By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

As a CART provider, teacher, tutor, coach, and author, I receive many e-mails that are enlightening, sincere and detailed. Many contain paragraphs with question after question.
Many contain the same questions week after week.

I respond as best as I can, then another arrives: “How do I …?” “Where can I learn quickly …?” Many request specific information with statistics to be included, and “Can I have it before the close of business today? Do you have any forms from your business that we can use. You can e-mail or fax them to us. We really need it.”

Today I received: “How do I learn to CART and write numbers without the number bar?” “Can I attend a CART seminar if I’m not real-timing?” “If I move, how do I continue to earn money when only 50 percent of the transcripts will be ordered. I’ll earn less, but have more free time. I do real-time and have clean notes, so I’m considering CART or closed captioning if I really can’t earn enough to live on.”

Then I received this: “Regarding CART, it’s like a beehive. Everyone is protective of their own territory. Someone is going to come in with a can of Raid and kill them all off if you don’t band together, get organized.” I sent that person a thank-you note for giving me the big laugh for the day.

The continuing “how do I do it quickly” reminds me of the Dalai Lama.

One day a person asked, “How do I achieve enlightenment quickly?” The Dalai Lama responded silently. He cried.

So I’ve put together a FAQ list. Parts II-VII will follow and is posted on http://www.catapultdix.com/ and Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

As technology expands, we need to be more fluid with our skills. Here’s a sampling in the order in which I usually receive requests for information.

1. “I’m not happy with the work, long hours and deadlines.” Also: “I don’t want to work with attorneys anymore. What do you suggest?”

There are many opportunities for reporters. If someone wants to work in legal settings, or not, there now are many choices; this creates options.

2. “How do I get started?”

I strongly suggest joining your national and state organizations. They’re founts of information. State and national representatives continually attend seminars geared to helping and leading others. Many seminars are created from their seminars. You need to read your state and national magazines. Each NCRA Journal is varied and informative on all topics. (No, they didn’t ask me to say this. I’m in the trenches, like almost every other author.)

3. “Where do I get started?”

If you receive state and national magazines, they often list seminars, publications, Web sites and other information. Only you know where your skills truly are. When you read the entire magazine, become familiar with terms, products, names, presenters, speakers or associations, you will be a better judge of where your “where” is.

4. “How do I learn the most in the quickest time?”

Improving skills is a lifelong process. Preparation and education are key. Those who learn the quickest usually were the best prepared; they didn’t do it overnight.

5. “What can I do that will save me money now so I can learn?”

Also: “I know I’ll lose speed if I change my writing style. How do I prevent that?”

The answer lies in where each person is when he or she asks. Incremental changes can be made. Massive changes might be avoided. But if you want to real-time, you need to tweak your writing. I suggest that people not look at this as losing money, but as a shift to a bigger arena of income that becomes available – one that may not be there now if they are unhappy with their current writing skills.

6. “How do I get work? How do I meet clients?”

Work is anyplace where the English language is spoken and/or muttered (I tease). In many locations, “clients” are called “consumers.” After prepping, to get work you need to find someone who knows consumers, or you need to meet them to create your work. You need to become familiar with their culture, sensitivities and needs.

7. “How do I learn about clients, cultures, sensitivities?”

State and national associations are a wonderful starting ground. Most have their own Web sites. The Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, AGB; the Registry of Interpreters (sign interpreters), RID; Self-Help for Hard of Hearing People, SHHH – renamed to Hearing Loss Association of America; the National Association of the Deaf, NAD – each association is different. Look them up.

Many national associations have state and local chapters. The key is to be prepared with your knowledge, then arrive with your equipment. Many groups now are very familiar with CART. They have an understanding of the needs in their backyard and who might need services. The Yellow Pages, United Way, sign interpreters, audiologists, school districts, universities – the list is endless – have information where services might be needed.

Unfortunately, most people ask some of these questions (or worse, they don’t) believing that if they can rea-ltime in depositions or court, they can “do this,” and they head out into the CART field.

This is a different ballgame. It is no different than real-timing on someone else’s software with his or her personal dictionary. The key to being successful when learning about CART is to do your homework before you go out. “Something is better than nothing” is not good for you or the consumer. You need to know this.

And when that “something is better than nothing” is discussed with me by someone seeking CART services, I decline the work. I choose not to work with companies that want the cheapest writer.

Many companies and educational institutions will ask, “Can’t you just find someone who needs an internship? This helps them to learn and helps us to save money.” I’m still amazed when that question is asked by people requesting our services (they often do not want to be sued). They do not want to compensate qualified reporters for their training, equipment and technical skills. The consumer deserves qualified services. His or her job and/or education may rely upon what that person receives – or does not receive – on the computer screen.

Knowing where the boundaries are in this field with your skills and the needs of the consumers is vital before you step out. Some may want to pay you a lower fee to “learn”; be careful.

Often qualified CART providers must go in after the fact to pick up where the person who was not prepared left off. That’s not pretty no matter where or how that happens.

8. “Should I learn sign language?”

I believe that each person who works with deaf individuals should know some signs. Is English their first language? Many, not all, deaf people communicate by signs. The more you know, the more flexible you are. If a person is deaf or hard-of-hearing, he or she may not sign. This is the key to the culture and sensitivity. From where I stand now, I simply ask, “What do you prefer?”

9. “How do I meet sign interpreters?”

Go where they go. Interpreters are experiencing national shortages. I went to places where they were. I waited for many to come to me. I was later told that it meant I really wanted to learn. I listed the information in the order in which I receive the requests. This is the beginning of a discussion, the first in a series with seven parts.
The complete series is posted http://www.catapultdix.com/ and www.monettebenoit.com

Falling on Deaf Ears … the sad part, to me, about writing this article?

Many people who request that these questions ‘be’ answered quickly, so they can learn quickly, may not be members of our national and their state association. Remote CART is expanding our possibilities. Now we have to expand our skills. The market has never been so varied, so wide.

And I still swear “learning theory” was the hardest thing I ever did.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

How’d You Get Here? Part Two

“How’d You Get Here?”
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2008 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved

Last month I wrote that, as a tutor and court reporter, I am persistently asked, “How’d you get through it? How’d you get here?”

I e-mailed four questions to leaders: How were you attracted to court reporting? How did you pick your school? What work did you do? What are you doing now? Each has a grand story. We are always a court reporting student – always– expanding our skills, work and goals.

Gayl Hardeman: I was attracted to court reporting because I thought it would be a great summer job between academic years as a school teacher. I picked the only night class around (vo-tech). I graduated by way of Leo Zoffness, a tutor and former New York court reporting instructor. I studied weekends at his house; he made me study tapes, graded my notes. I became a freelancer in 1970. I worked 12 years, and then took off nine years to be a mom. I dabbled in acting and church work. Currently, I provide CART and captioning and have a remote, on-site CART business specializing in litigation realtime for professionals who call for help. I love this profession. It is perfect job for ex-English teacher who minored in business!
Gayl Hardeman, RDR, CCP, FAPR, Pinellas Park, Florida

Gayl’s husband, Michael J. Klutzow, A.S., C.L.V.S., is owner, principal videographer, Rockwater Technical Services, audio, video services, years of experience, professionalism in technology fields.

Lynne Marie Zakrzewski: I wanted to work in the sheriff’s department with my father. He said the department was no place for me and suggested court reporting. He’d seen the reporter in court. He thought it might be a good fit since I hit 95 wpm on a manual typewriter in 7th grade. I also played piano, flute. Selecting a college while not having a car, I looked at the business school because it was closest. Court reporting was on the list! Two years later I received my A.B.A. and began working as a freelance reporter. It was the end of the recession; wanting more work, I found myself at a second freelance firm two and a half years later. The second firm told me I wasn’t “cut out for reporting.” I sat for my certificate of merit that week and passed all four legs in one sitting. I was hired as an official, where I worked for eight years before re-entering the freelance arena. I wanted to be home for my kids; freelancing was on an obvious decline here due to contracting. Wanting to challenge myself, and in an effort to “move forward,” I entered the captioning arena. It is here where I found my true passion and can’t imagine doing anything else. It brings sheer pleasure!
Lynne Marie Zakrzewski, RMR, CRR, CBC, CPE, CSR, Willis, Michigan, President-Elect

Karen Finkelstein: I had gone to college to get a degree in speech therapy/audiology/communicative disorders. By the end of my second year, I wasn’t positive if that was what I wanted to do. I took a year off, traveled with a girlfriend, lived with my aunt and uncle, eventually ended back at mom and dad’s. Mom was the office manager for three orthopedic surgeons; she knew court reporters who reported surgeon’s depositions. Mom rushed home one day, “This is right up your alley! You’ve played piano since you were little, earned excellent grades in English, have good keyboarding skills.” Although I had no idea what reporters really did or what training entailed, I moved to Madison, Wisconsin, and saw an ad in the paper for Madison Business College. I called, signed up for court reporting classes. I fell in love with the machine!

I graduated after two years with an Associate’s Degree. We had class five days per week. I worked in an office every afternoon. I practiced during the evenings and loved writing on the machine. I’d usually pull it out anytime I watched TV. I had an opportunity to be “official reporter” for mock trials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School, UW-Madison. No magic powders, Monette – just hours on the machine!

My first job was for the State of Wisconsin Department of Hearings and Rules. I traveled the state with hearing examiners taking testimony at probation and parole revocation hearings. (Whoever thought I’d be hanging out in county jails and the segregation building of state prison? I dressed conservatively when I walked the cell block! One inmate was so dangerous that he and the hearing examiner were inside the cell while I sat outside bars to record testimony. Oh, hearings at the psychiatric hospital to determine if sex offenders were sufficiently rehabilitated were interesting.) After two years, I moved to Washington, D.C., accepting a freelance position. I loved freelance (except for nasty Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hearings). One week I was in West Virginia doing black lung hearings, and the next week I’d be in Boston taking testimony of M.I.T. professors, then back to Washington for depos on cases involving the Smithsonian to the sinking of a Norwegian tanker ship. Never a dull moment.

Two years later, there was an opening at D.C. Superior Court, where I accepted an officialship. That was a social environment – mingling every day with judges, U.S. attorneys, public defenders, marshals, court clerks. We rotated from judge to judge each month, so I was exposed to civil matters, criminal felonies, misdemeanors, preliminary hearings, and family court in an extremely high-volume courthouse.

I then spent 22 years at the National Captioning Institute, first as staff captioner, then supervisor/trainer, and then as a manager. My last two years, I managed recruitment, screening, and hiring of live captioners. Now I’m Director of Education and School Development for NCRA, sharing my love of the profession. Working with students and schools was always one of my favorite things. Now I get to focus on it full time! I couldn’t be in a more perfect job. Karen Finkelstein, Director, Education and School Development, NCRA, Vienna, Virginia

CART Provider: Nothing remarkable. I graduated from Princeton, utterly without distinction, majoring in Germanic philology. I did not get into the military. (I was rejected due to a refractive error.) I stayed out of the Army draft (I passed over by one number in draft lottery). I had multiple jobs, including flying my father around in the family plane to French West Indies investment properties (we lived in St. Croix then; I happened to speak French), keeping books in a marina, operating a 10-ton IBM computer in an oil refinery, and teaching Latin.

Mom played the cello in a piano trio in which I occasionally participated. The violinist was the late Clayton Muise of New York, court reporter. He suggested I consider court reporter. He received a catalog from the (late) great McMahon College, the only school I ever heard of, so off I went. I then worked as a freelancer in the Boston area and was able to pursue musical interests as well. I’ve been doing educational and conference CART for well over a decade now, along with freelance legal work for twelve years. Not very fascinating. I hope this helps. Anonymity requested.

Monette Benoit: I ended my column last month: “Did you see similarities?
This court reporter is still learning, still loving it. And you?”
The similarities I saw then are here, too.

How’d we get here? Family and friends were the common referral. It was a parent or a friend who suggested court reporting. It was not recruitment or media campaigns – Many are not working for large salaries, sans shoes, from home. That’s how we got here.
We listened to a referral and sought details.

How’d we get through it? By tenaciously working to pursue our goals, passions. We often lived and breathed steno schooling, practicing and learning for two years.

The replies I received are from distinguished leaders who progressed through court reporting school, graduated – and then each excelled throughout multiple venues, embraced, accepted, technology, change. Someone we knew thought we might like this profession.

In Part One, last month, and Part Two, here, we’ve read about determination, hard work, family, music and language talents, love of the machine, and consistent work to improve skills after graduation.

We each arrived separately to now stand together.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

"Still Processing And Snowglobes"

“Still Processing And Snowglobes”
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2006 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

“You’re processing; you’re not stuck,” began my correspondence with Janet Tilly, a student who contacted me. She had written, “I am currently stuck trying to attain 170 words per minute.”

My April 2005 ‘Beyond The Comfort Zone’ article and Monette’s Musings Blog, www.monettebenoit.com, detailed how one sentence I shared shifted had changed Janet’s processing. Less than one year later (after being ‘stuck’), Janet entered our profession with determination, processing and captioning, court reporting CATapult CD material.

Janet recently emailed, “Still processing! I completed school. I discovered I have something new to process. After reading your words about processing, I never looked at school the same way. You took the time to go beyond my questions about your CATapult CD product. You took the time to address the root of my problem, which turned out to be a problem of perception and mindset.”

Janet shares: “I thought most of the ‘processing’ would be in court reporting school. I knew transitioning from school to work would be taxing, but I didn’t realize I would process now more than ever.

“My second deposition reflected my processing had just begun. I can’t express how grateful I am that you, Monette, pointed out the mentality of processing. I don’t think I could get up every morning, facing unknowns without having it all in perspective. Life is one big learning experience; court reporting is part of my life, so I shouldn’t expect this to be different than other things I learn each day.

“To all students: Finishing school is not the end of learning, it’s the beginning. Prepare on the front end; don’t be surprised by opportunities to process once you graduate! Like Monette’s sister-in-law Wenny wrote, whenever we are down, we have to get up, ‘try harder; each time you try harder.’ Your sister-in-law Wenny blessed me with a mantra from the January 2005 ‘Beyond The Comfort Zone’ article, “Try Harder; Each Time ‘You’ Try Harder!” (This article about Wenny, January 2005, and Janet’s April 2005 article may be accessed on http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and blog Monette’s Musings)

“I‘m now out of school; sometimes it feels like I’m in a snowglobe that keeps getting shaken. Working was exciting, but scary. I had interned as often as I could. The reporters I interned with were fantastic. Reporters answered any questions, pointing out things I didn’t know to ask about. And I was nervous! I can’t remember praying as hard as I prayed before my first deposition. (My prayers were answered when I held it together during readback.) After, I was walking on clouds; you would have thought I had orchestrated world peace.

“The next day, I was confident, still walking on clouds. This is the first time my snowglobe was shaken. The doctor specialized in otolaryngology; I know this because everyone said it as often as possible. He detailed thyroidectomy, parathyroid, cricothyroid fascia, isthmus and thyroplasty. My saving grace: The witness spoke slowly, enunciating well; attorneys took notes, pausing between answers and questions. This wasn’t the scary part — that happened when the deposition ended.

“I was realtiming for myself, recording audio on my laptop. The firm owner proofs my work. Because I am new and paranoid, I also had a digital recorder. Into the deposition, I realized I had not turned on the laptop audio. At first pause, I turned it on. I started obsessing: “Did I drop?” I knew the recorder was on, but couldn’t stop the mental process. Then someone mentioned otolaryngology snapping me back into the moment. I stopped the panic, sure I’d written well, worked to continue doing so.

“Long story short, there were several minutes when the attorneys stopped the depo, then needed to go back on the record where I had no audio. No audiosync, plus no digital recording! I pressed the wrong button on the digital recorder, twice! “Once I saw the recorder had not recorded, I thought about the depo, still confident I’d written well, verbatim. Days later, I started worrying.

“Editing, I remembered, while packing at the end, the attorneys were talking to one another; I overhead their conversations. Editing, I remembered things I knew were said, but were not in my transcript. Since I was new, I started obsessing. What if statements I were remembered were ‘on the record’ and not conversations? I couldn’t have dropped all that. No way. Wait a minute; what about in school when I knew I’d passed that test, but didn’t? Here I knew I’d written well on the job.

“This argument went through my head all night; the next morning I was throwing up. I was sure I’d never report again. Mentally, I turned an ant hill into Mount Everest. I don’t have words to describe how far out of proportion this had been blown. I called the firm owner. She calmed me saying this was going to be okay. She said she’d help me; we would look at the transcript, see what we thought. After talking with her, I began to think rationally.

“Thinking clearly, instead of worse-case-scenario, I realized I was borrowing trouble. I had concentrated so hard on writing, my head hurt, I ached all over. I had felt good until I let my imagination run away with me. I printed the transcript; it was good. Well, it was good after it had been proofed by someone else and corrections were made. Who knew commas would challenge me at age 36?

“This story can be picked apart backwards, forwards. You bet I haven’t made those mistakes again; there have been others, but not those. This is somewhat embarrassing, but maybe someone will benefit from it. I have more days where I left jobs walking on clouds than I have feeling like I was in the snowglobe. I’ve made mistakes; I’ve beat myself up over them, but when finished, I filed them, taking what I learned, leaving negativity behind. And the next day, I processed, tried harder.

“I’ve been so lucky; my instructors, fellow students were the best. I interned with experienced reporters who, I’m sure, had better things to do than answer my questions.

“To the people who shared in forums and have written JCR (NCRA Journal of Court Reporting) articles, thank you! Several times I encountered situations and knew what to do because I’d read about it. I wish I could thank everyone who helped me. The only things I know to do to begin thanking them are to continue improving and to one day help new reporters. Bless you all!”

Monette: Spoken like a veteran, Janet. We are never stuck unless we choose to be.

We process, building experiences and wisdom from within, sometimes alone, sometimes with others. Yet when we process, “trying harder each time,” perhaps our snowglobe is not blurry. Perhaps it is a remarkable globe we may view with sparkle and wonder.

The snowglobe on my desk, gifted by a student, now court reporter, is a ballerina atop pink heart-shaped flakes, arms folded in prayer. Large print reads: “Lord, Keep Me On My Toes.” Still processing, Janet, you have helped thousands, seated and on your toes.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!