Press Release: Purple Books Pass Rate 99% for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

The Purple Books, CRRbooks.com, is proud to share: January’s 2017 RPR and multiple State CSR pass rates were over 99%.

CA’s CSR tests in March; NY’s Civil Service Court Reporter test is May; NCRA’s RPR and RDR is April 8 – 20; IL, TX, and WA test April 2017. Additional states and NCRA have exam registration deadlines.

Learn ‘how’ to answer, so you will be Done In One, too.

Complete Set, Purple Books, 4 books: http://crrbooks.com/product/written-exams The ‘Realtime Vocab Workbook’ is $ 8.00 (regular price: $ 36.00) when the Complete Set is ordered.

Trio Set, Purple Books, 3 books: http://crrbooks.com/…/2-trio-test-prep-3-book-set-must-have…

Many students and reporters continue to write “it was the best investment – ever.”

Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and information the Purple Books are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study

Study the only textbook and textbook package for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs.
Now, the Purple Books is the only material available for NCRA’s RDR written exam.

The 7th edition textbook for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, State exams, New York’s Civil Service Exam, with the NCRA CRC Primer by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner contains updated, expanded chapters: Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics. Detailed chapters include Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR candidates focus on the popular “Complete Test Prep Set” that includes: *Textbook, **Companion Workbook (*2,002 practice questions), ***Companion Guide (cross references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice questions), and the ****RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Questions and multiple choices on exams are not repeated, so don’t try memorizing them. Instead, learn how to take the test!

Thousands of students, novice and long-time reporters advance skills with Purple Books, CRR Books, Test-Prep Material.

Students and professionals also seek tutoring and career counseling with Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer. No two people are alike. Custom sessions are created, per your requests. Start today. Plan and prepare now. Monette wants to help you.
CRRbooks.com Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Purple Books, Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.
Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

Press Release: Plan Now! Prepare Now! 98% Successful Pass

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

October’s NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSR written exams are right around the corner. Currently, registration periods are open.

Plan now! Prepare now to become one of the 98% successful pass rate by students, court reporters, and CART Captioners on the RPR, RDR, and State CSR exams.

Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and
proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study

RPR, RDR, and State CSR candidates focus on the popular “Full Test Prep Set” that includes: Textbook, Workbook (*2,002 practice test questions), Companion Study Guide (cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice questions), and RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Questions and multiple choices on exams are not repeated, so don’t try memorizing them. Instead, learn how to take the test!

Study the only textbook and textbook package for the RPR and now the only material available for the RDR exam.

RPR and CSR candidates: “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” are detailed online.

RDR candidates have two choices to earn the most elite certification within our court reporting profession: “Full Test Prep Set” — or the updated, revised Complete Test Prep Textbook, 6th edition, and RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors,
CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters.

CRRbooks.com is committed to helping you to Get ‘er Done in Just One.

CRR Books released the revised and updated Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Written Test Prep Textbook, Sixth Edition, 2015.

The text by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner, contains updated, expanded chapters covering: Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics. Detailed chapters include: Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

Thousands of students and novice and long-time reporters advance skills with CRR Books Test Prep Material. Students and professionals also seek tutoring and career counseling with Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer. No two people are alike. Custom sessions are created. Start today. Plan and prepare now! Monette wants to help you.
www.CRRbooks.com Monette@CRRbooks.com

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 1, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

This individual and I have worked together in the past. She emailed with a question requesting numerous sessions.

Again, I found it interesting that the tenacity and goals that were set by this person while enrolled in court reporting school (her words) “who would never make it out of school fast enough” were now similar to today’s scheduled session.

“I’m not going to spend another dime to improve my skills when I have paid so much to get where I am.” (I remained silent.)

“I know people can do what I am trying to do now. If they can do it, why can’t I? I want – No, I need to earn more money. I didn’t go to court reporting school to be at the bottom of a seniority list with working court reporters after this period of time, did I?” (I remained silent.)

The sentence I truly enjoyed (professionally and personally here), “I’ll just get there and take it from there when I do get there, okay?”

I listened to this gainfully employed court reporter.

“The support on my software is about to expire. I have to pay for that, too. And the support on my new writer is about to expire. More money there! All that adds up to a lot of money and it is due very, very soon!”

The reporter summed it up, “I just am wondering exactly why I am doing this now …”

And there we had it. The dancing zebra in the room was bowing and exiting.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

Part II of III is posted May 15, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

“Homeland” and Jeff Hutchins

“Homeland” and Jeff Hutchins
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2007 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

In my opinion, Jeff Hutchins, more than any person, tipped our court reporting profession. I have always believed that more court reporters, captioners, and students need to know Jeff’s involvement in captioning technology and our profession.

In 1972, The Caption Center began captioning The French Chef. Jeff Hutchins and five individuals were hired to learn how to transcribe the PBS news four and one-half hours after it originated on ABC. The show recorded live 6 p.m. EST, was transcribed by five people.

They heavily edited programs, rewriting portions, to produce a steady reading rate of 120 words per minute at a fourth-grade reading level because experts on deafness, deaf and hearing, felt few deaf people would be able to follow verbatim captioned news. The show was broadcast with integrated captions to PBS at 11 p.m. with “live-display captioning,” a term coined by Jeff Hutchins.

In 1979, NCI, the National Captioning Institute, a private nonprofit corporation, was created using a $6 million grant to the U.S. Department of Education to develop captioning technology. Arrangements were made with Texas Instruments to produce 10 integrated circuits (“chips”) that were placed inside decoders that consumers purchased. Sanyo contracted to make “TeleCaption” decoders; Sears was given exclusive rights to sell. Once closed captioning of pre-recorded programs were under way, attention turned to development of realtime captioning of live programs. NCI hired Jeff Hutchins to oversee systems development.

In 1981, the first sports captioning was developed by Jeff Hutchins when he generated his own commentary programming of 200–300 sentences. Sentences were set with a blank space at the end of each line. The typist (often Jeff) sent a sentence filling in blanks with players’ name and facts. The displayed captions were not verbatim to commentators; facts were “called up” to replace sports running commentary. Deaf and hard-of- hearing people still desired announcers’ verbatim translation; realtime continued to be developed.

That same year, Jeff tested a prototype by Translation Systems, Inc (TSI) for captioning live TV programs. NCI hired Martin H. Block.

In 1982, Jeff Hutchins selected Marty Block to become the first realtime court reporter to be a captioner. Mr. Block became a member of the team that developed live closed captioning with Jeff at NCI in 1981 in order to caption the 1982 Academy Awards Presentation. This is the first live telecast with realtime closed captions that displayed realtime captioning of unscripted dialogue with Johnny Carson as host. Source: A.D.A. Civil Rights, Affirmative Action, Business and Convention Handbook and CATapult CD, Volume B.

I learned this history from Jeff Hutchins in 1995 when I was seeking captioning history as I prepared The History of the A.D.A. and Captioning.

Jeff and I became friends when I phoned VITAC seeking captioning history. He took my phone call and offered to fax me information. Within minutes a 13-page fax arrived in my office. My cat Brutus used to stand on my fax machine, playfully batting paper as it arrived. That cat became so entangled in Jeff’s multipage fax that I immediately phoned Jeff immediately sharing he’d darn near killed my cat. Thereafter, Brutus never ventured near any fax machine.

Jeff and I kept in touch. I loved to listen to his stories on how he worked, how captioning was created. Jeff is the nicest gentleman; he has pulled more bunnies out of his hat when I need help or advice. When I visited VITAC, I asked Jeff for my tour. He and Gary Robson privately showed me their technology. I cherish memories of their pure joy describing their world – their work.

When captioning companies discussed forming a coalition, Jeff Hutchins was their choice. Throughout the years, I receive e-mails from Jeff traveling the United States and France. While I wrote this article in August, Jeff’s on a driving vacation.

When I received Jeff’s e-mail about his CD, I laughed. This was one side of Jeff that I had not seen – or heard.

In 2006, Jeff Hutchins retired as chairman of the Accessible Media Industry Coalition, a trade association of companies that provides services such as captioning and video description so he could make media programs accessible to people with hearing and/or vision impairments.

Prior to this, Jeff was owner and executive vice president, Planning and Development, of VITAC, a Pittsburgh-based company providing complete captioning services nationwide. He also was director of Systems Development at NCI (1980-86); and from 1973-1980 was producer of “The Captioned ABC News” and an executive for The Caption Center, WGBH-TV, in Boston.

Jeff has been honored as one of the Pioneers who helped implement closed captioning. He was the author of the closed-captioning specifications adopted by the FCC in 1992, and the principal author of EIA-608. Mr. Hutchins currently is a member of the Boards of Trustees of the Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf (Pittsburgh, PA) and the American Community School in Beirut, Lebanon. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Broadcasting and Film from Boston University.

Here’s the June 8, 2007 e-mail prompting this holiday column:

Dear Friends, I am very excited to tell you about a four-year project, and I hope you’ll be excited, too. I’ve been producing a CD of original songs I’ve written over the past 35 years or so. I always wanted to know what they’d sound like if a full band played them, instead of just me on a guitar or me in my head. I thought some of the songs would sound pretty good if they were well produced.

Four years ago, I started working with Korel Tunador, a talented man who moved from Pittsburgh to Los Angeles to pursue his music career. Between gigs, he composed and arranged songs for which I’d written melodies and lyrics. Then in early 2006, he joined the Goo Goo Dolls for their international tour, and he remains with that famous, popular band. (They’ll be on Jay Leno for the umpteenth time Friday night!) He asked their drummer, Mike Malinin, to lay down drum tracks for five of my songs. Mike agreed; together he and Korel provide nearly all instrumentation.

Korel finished the twelfth song last December; since then I’ve been doing final mixes in Pittsburgh at Mr. Smalls Studio. There, I met Liz Berlin, a singer with Rusted Root, a popular band that went double-platinum in the ’90s. She agreed to do lead vocals on my song “No Shame.” Liz designed the CD package, which looks like a “gallery” wall in my home might look.

So, at long last, the CD is finished. It’s called “Homeland,” because that song appears twice on the CD: once in generic version, once in a special bonus track with lyrics written for the Aramco Brats with whom I grew up in Saudi Arabia.

You can preview 2:00 minutes worth of each song or buy the complete Homeland CD by going to www.cdbaby.com/hutchinsjeff. To purchase individual songs for iTunes, just go to iTunes and search for Jeff Hutchins. (CD Baby has great independent artists!)

You can also visit Jeff’s website to hear several Homeland complete songs (http://www.jeffhutchins.com/), or go to Jeff’s MySpace account: www.myspace.com/jeffhutchinshomeland.

It’s all professionally done in spite of the fact that I sing all but two songs. Then let me know what you think. If you like it, please tell others. I need to sell a LOT of CDs to pay for this thing! Thanks for letting me tell you about “Homeland.”

Monette: This is great music, folks! As the holidays approach, a perfect gift for our CD players, friends and family should be Jeff’s CD. Jeff has shared so much with us. Check out “Homeland,” put your feet up, rest your hands – then tip back and enjoy Jeff Hutchins’ brilliant creations.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

"Still Processing And Snowglobes"

“Still Processing And Snowglobes”
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2006 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

“You’re processing; you’re not stuck,” began my correspondence with Janet Tilly, a student who contacted me. She had written, “I am currently stuck trying to attain 170 words per minute.”

My April 2005 ‘Beyond The Comfort Zone’ article and Monette’s Musings Blog, www.monettebenoit.com, detailed how one sentence I shared shifted had changed Janet’s processing. Less than one year later (after being ‘stuck’), Janet entered our profession with determination, processing and captioning, court reporting CATapult CD material.

Janet recently emailed, “Still processing! I completed school. I discovered I have something new to process. After reading your words about processing, I never looked at school the same way. You took the time to go beyond my questions about your CATapult CD product. You took the time to address the root of my problem, which turned out to be a problem of perception and mindset.”

Janet shares: “I thought most of the ‘processing’ would be in court reporting school. I knew transitioning from school to work would be taxing, but I didn’t realize I would process now more than ever.

“My second deposition reflected my processing had just begun. I can’t express how grateful I am that you, Monette, pointed out the mentality of processing. I don’t think I could get up every morning, facing unknowns without having it all in perspective. Life is one big learning experience; court reporting is part of my life, so I shouldn’t expect this to be different than other things I learn each day.

“To all students: Finishing school is not the end of learning, it’s the beginning. Prepare on the front end; don’t be surprised by opportunities to process once you graduate! Like Monette’s sister-in-law Wenny wrote, whenever we are down, we have to get up, ‘try harder; each time you try harder.’ Your sister-in-law Wenny blessed me with a mantra from the January 2005 ‘Beyond The Comfort Zone’ article, “Try Harder; Each Time ‘You’ Try Harder!” (This article about Wenny, January 2005, and Janet’s April 2005 article may be accessed on http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and blog Monette’s Musings)

“I‘m now out of school; sometimes it feels like I’m in a snowglobe that keeps getting shaken. Working was exciting, but scary. I had interned as often as I could. The reporters I interned with were fantastic. Reporters answered any questions, pointing out things I didn’t know to ask about. And I was nervous! I can’t remember praying as hard as I prayed before my first deposition. (My prayers were answered when I held it together during readback.) After, I was walking on clouds; you would have thought I had orchestrated world peace.

“The next day, I was confident, still walking on clouds. This is the first time my snowglobe was shaken. The doctor specialized in otolaryngology; I know this because everyone said it as often as possible. He detailed thyroidectomy, parathyroid, cricothyroid fascia, isthmus and thyroplasty. My saving grace: The witness spoke slowly, enunciating well; attorneys took notes, pausing between answers and questions. This wasn’t the scary part — that happened when the deposition ended.

“I was realtiming for myself, recording audio on my laptop. The firm owner proofs my work. Because I am new and paranoid, I also had a digital recorder. Into the deposition, I realized I had not turned on the laptop audio. At first pause, I turned it on. I started obsessing: “Did I drop?” I knew the recorder was on, but couldn’t stop the mental process. Then someone mentioned otolaryngology snapping me back into the moment. I stopped the panic, sure I’d written well, worked to continue doing so.

“Long story short, there were several minutes when the attorneys stopped the depo, then needed to go back on the record where I had no audio. No audiosync, plus no digital recording! I pressed the wrong button on the digital recorder, twice! “Once I saw the recorder had not recorded, I thought about the depo, still confident I’d written well, verbatim. Days later, I started worrying.

“Editing, I remembered, while packing at the end, the attorneys were talking to one another; I overhead their conversations. Editing, I remembered things I knew were said, but were not in my transcript. Since I was new, I started obsessing. What if statements I were remembered were ‘on the record’ and not conversations? I couldn’t have dropped all that. No way. Wait a minute; what about in school when I knew I’d passed that test, but didn’t? Here I knew I’d written well on the job.

“This argument went through my head all night; the next morning I was throwing up. I was sure I’d never report again. Mentally, I turned an ant hill into Mount Everest. I don’t have words to describe how far out of proportion this had been blown. I called the firm owner. She calmed me saying this was going to be okay. She said she’d help me; we would look at the transcript, see what we thought. After talking with her, I began to think rationally.

“Thinking clearly, instead of worse-case-scenario, I realized I was borrowing trouble. I had concentrated so hard on writing, my head hurt, I ached all over. I had felt good until I let my imagination run away with me. I printed the transcript; it was good. Well, it was good after it had been proofed by someone else and corrections were made. Who knew commas would challenge me at age 36?

“This story can be picked apart backwards, forwards. You bet I haven’t made those mistakes again; there have been others, but not those. This is somewhat embarrassing, but maybe someone will benefit from it. I have more days where I left jobs walking on clouds than I have feeling like I was in the snowglobe. I’ve made mistakes; I’ve beat myself up over them, but when finished, I filed them, taking what I learned, leaving negativity behind. And the next day, I processed, tried harder.

“I’ve been so lucky; my instructors, fellow students were the best. I interned with experienced reporters who, I’m sure, had better things to do than answer my questions.

“To the people who shared in forums and have written JCR (NCRA Journal of Court Reporting) articles, thank you! Several times I encountered situations and knew what to do because I’d read about it. I wish I could thank everyone who helped me. The only things I know to do to begin thanking them are to continue improving and to one day help new reporters. Bless you all!”

Monette: Spoken like a veteran, Janet. We are never stuck unless we choose to be.

We process, building experiences and wisdom from within, sometimes alone, sometimes with others. Yet when we process, “trying harder each time,” perhaps our snowglobe is not blurry. Perhaps it is a remarkable globe we may view with sparkle and wonder.

The snowglobe on my desk, gifted by a student, now court reporter, is a ballerina atop pink heart-shaped flakes, arms folded in prayer. Large print reads: “Lord, Keep Me On My Toes.” Still processing, Janet, you have helped thousands, seated and on your toes.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

What Would You Do?

What Would You Do?
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2007 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

What would you do if someone you love is charged with an alleged crime? What if a family member is handcuffed and quickly removed from your home? What would you do if you are unable to hear? What would you do if equal communication offered late in events is not what you need? Would you raise your voice, scream – or would you bow your head, not wanting to upset anyone?

This story is true. As I write in December 2006, many individuals are unsure where the allegation, legal process will end.

Let’s say charges are read to the parent after the minor has been arrested, handcuffed, removed from the home, seated in a squad car and charged with an alleged offense. As police explain details, the parent has to get the hearing aid, off-duty that late hour. The hearing dog had alerted the parent to heavy knocking on the door. The child is driven off into the night, then incarcerated.

Stunned and shocked as the parent, your world has now changed. If you are unable to hear, will you stomp to defend your loved one or will you make nice to avoid upsetting anyone – anyone who may bring your loved one home – one day or one moment sooner?

Let’s say this experience is your first one within the legal system. You never visited anyone in jail. Now you have to be cleared through security, counselors. Now your hearing aid is on-duty; you focus to understand each word, which is a struggle at best. You hope for early release – a new term. Also new: Will your minor be tried as child or adult?

Most likely you will not qualify for free attorney aid; legal counsel is required. Your reaction could be “This can’t be happening!” It can. Attorneys requiring compensation, often substantial fees, will need to defend a minor incarcerated without bail. Also new: Minors are not granted bail. What will you now do for attorney’s fees for an alleged offense?

Let’s say there’s no prior history to prepare this family. If this is not your family, perhaps one could think “this is our legal system; it protects all of us.”

But what if your child is placed behind secure walls, visits are limited. No physical contact is permitted. Detainees are required to earn points to earn rights.

All communication is shared behind a wall with a small metal circle, thick dark screen. If you rely on hearing aids and read lips, your opportunity to hear is drastically reduced. As you struggle to understand words, learn details, to check on your minor, and to learn about the legal process and allegations, what would you do if you could not see the lips of your loved one or hear each word?

As court reporters we know that fact-finding trials are held. But when a person is held behind a wall, what then? I know deaf prisoners in San Antonio – ‘Deaf’ and all prisoners often live within a horrible world called a jail.

Deaf prisoners cannot be mainstreamed. They cannot hear anyone behind them, so they lose the ability to defend themselves. Deaf are typically mandated to infirmaries. This may appear fine for hearing, but deaf are now constrained to a tiny area. Social contact is limited. One of the greatest gifts people can give deaf (and deaf community) is to visit deaf prisoners. Deaf are isolated, alone.

If your loved minor is detained, they could be placed into foster care – an option decided by the court. If the parent is deaf or hearing-impaired, trust me, the parent worries about losing rights to their child because of the parent’s deafness. Yes, it does happen. Is it fair? No. Deaf parents have lost “in the best interest of the child.”

If that child is not able to fully communicate with their parent, then that child experiences further trauma. This CODA child (named after an international group called Children of Deaf Adults) will know the parent’s visit is approaching and that communication is limited prior, during, and after each limited noncontact visit. CODA children grow up fast – they say.

Legal facts will unfold with time – but not fast enough for the parent and loved one – in a country where everyone is innocent until proven guilty. Stress will ripple to others involved and excaberated because of the hearing impairment. Powerless, frustrated, scared may now describe you. Scarred may describe the minor. How will these events affect the minor’s future life?

Limited visitors, who are approved in advance, can be removed at the discretion of parole employees and counselors. Only attorneys and clergy are exempt. Visits are limited to two a week. Detainees have new rules, regulations.

If the parent is hearing-impaired, how does the child share this new bewildering world that has few privileges, mandatory lights out, few books and pencils (if any), and permits only limited communication?

During visits, if you are hearing-impaired (self-described term) contact is further limited. You also notice that everyone else, including the hearing, is finding communication a challenge with the screened circle.

And if a hearing is held for your loved one – perhaps an odd word for the parent not hearing – and if the room does not have assistive listening devices, communication is again limited. When this parent questioned assistance, the parent was informed only “a sign interpreter could be supplied.” Great, but this adult does not use sign language.

Since no law states a parent need be present for legal proceedings of his or her child or police interrogation, this will be a huge shock, too. Will your loved one know when to volunteer information – or – perhaps will your child simply shut down, alone, isolated, and in fear?

If the fact-finding trial has evidence to move forward, perhaps the next phase is a jury trial, or will a plea bargain be accepted because of earlier facts? Attorneys cost money, incarceration is bleak. Decisions are often made on these factors. Trials take time; trials are pricey. I was a court reporter in Miami’s juvenile public defender’s office many years ago, and I am still amazed by the information I reported and witnessed.

So, are you at the mercy of the legal system, the court? Would you “bite your tongue” to avoid stirring any problems, hoping your loved one comes home one second sooner?

Will you struggle to remain unangry knowing that if any person involved in the legal process takes a holiday or sick day during the process, this will cause further delays, postponing justice. And if an experienced juvenile lawyer says this “is a zoo,” what would you do?

I wrote to the parent that I was outraged CART (communication access realtime) was not being shared. I requested permission to write this article. The parent, in response to “how are you,” replied with details and “Thank God for warm furry things that sleep in your arms and purr.”

As I finish writing this article, the hearing was delayed – again. Facts surrounding the alleged incident were shared again, claiming this was a “minor event” – a repeated fact officially shared for many weeks now while the minor remained incarcerated.

And if your child was incarcerated well over one month, including Thanksgiving Day with no visit and Christmas without the ability to fully communicate with his or her parent, and the hearing-impaired parent is praying, praying, praying, I ask you, What would you do?

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

One Lost Sheep And What If …

One Lost Sheep And What If …
By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Do you have the skills to realtime for a deaf or hard-of-hearing person? You won’t know if you don’t try. What if you could find a comfortable environment to become realtime proficient?

What if you could nurture your realtime skills, build your confidence and attract new clients outside legal arenas. You can expand your skills by growing into the technology. You can realtime for people that appreciate you and your talents. The hardest part will be not taking yourself too seriously.

As a CART, communication access realtime translation, provider writing to large screens, I’ve realtimed unique events, assisting people who wouldn’t have participated if I wasn’t there: McGruff the Crime Dog who signs to children, religious gatherings, baptisms, funerals, voter forums, cochlear implant meetings for tots and children, theatrical plays, large conventions, banquets and much more.

I realtimed a deaf mime acting skits of Mr. Ed meets Batman. The audience joked that they always knew that horse wasn’t speaking because they knew how to read lips. The humor in this community just floors me. I’ve been the victim of more practical jokes than I care to admit, but I’m grateful for inclusion in their world.

Recently, I wrote a child singing “Old McDonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O” in the middle of a technical presentation. And yes, I’ve asked: The Deaf Society I work with prefers to be known as the Deaf World; not people who are deaf. When in doubt, ask. They don’t want us to define their world. They’ll be honored that you cared enough to ask how they describe themselves.

Where do you start? What if you wanted to begin, and someone said you had to become a certified court reporter, RMR and CRR, and have zero percent untrans? Where do you start to practice? That answer differs for each person, group, even and upon your skills.

Evaluate where you are. If you edit much of your work and haven’t purchased a laptop, you’re in for a bigger learning curve. But this is where the goal is created. Seek a group, arena or person. Ask if you can practice to expand your vocabulary. Knowledge of their culture and (to me) a sense of confidence develops to be able to write on a screen as a room watches — or laughs. Yet you have to keep writing. The earth will not swallow you, no matter how much you wish for it.

Study the group. Go slowly, but go forward. Where do people meet that might want this service? Call HLA (formerly SHHH), AGB, ALDA, United Way, the American Association of Retired Persons and sign interpreters.Why do they need you to provide this service?

I keep explanations simple. Our wires, equipment, plugs and technology are foreign to people.

Prepare answers to questions that you think you’ll be asked. The rest will flow from your heart.

I prepare flyers in several colors. Each is targeted to the event or educational level of the group: elementary/high school, adults, educators, hard-of-hearing, oral deaf, etc. When someone asks for information (usually as I’m writing in real-time on my steno machine), I point to flyers. When a person calls, I ask for the color of their handout. This saves me time.

Learn about their world. Reporters ask me: How do I write with a sign interpreter? Interpreters sign when people voice (speak). I call it “thigh-by-thigh” reporting. Interpreters, thigh by thigh, whisper words, interpreting signed discussions, so I can write on a screen.

Find one place – a church, class, organization open to the public – and attend regularly. Call ahead and explain what you’d like to do. Ask if you can take your equipment, sit in the back and practice. Tell the group you need their help. Once I offer my “deer in the headlights” look, they share information and speak so I can write their words into my dictionary. This is empowering to people you want to assist. Every person has thanked me for allowing them to help me. They tell me it makes them feel good to contribute. And I’m told the misconceptions I need to avoid. They tease, laugh and enjoy my struggles. Don’t be offended.

Expand your vocabulary. Write the news. Rent Robin Williams videos. Create a dictionary with terms other than legal terms and preponderance of the evidence. Check out the ‘CATapult Your Real-Time Dictionary CD’ series at www.CATapultdix.com

Ask to be included. A group will become protective of you. Teach them to be protective of your equipment. As your skills and friends expand, you become more confident. Get the details. How long is the meeting or event? Is the content technical? If someone is reading your screen, should there be two court reporters to ensure an accurate job? How long will they need the writer to write? When ‘they’ take a lunch break, are you given a lunch break? What speed do I need? Can a student do this? Always define “this.” Each group and situation will differ. Prepare as best as you can, then get into that saddle and just write.

After they’ve embraced you, your professional dictionary’s expanded, your confidence has grown, you’re realtiming live on a screen/laptop, then think about local meetings and state and national groups.

Consider your fees. How much do I charge? They can’t fire a pro bono writer in the corner with her shoulders at her ears. Earn your wings, then consider by the hours, level of difficulty, ASCII, day/evening rates and long-term commitments.

Think ahead. How do I handle multiple speakers when I’m used to stopping people? You can’t rely on a tape recorder when you CART in a public setting. Learn to fingerspell. I began by writing the alphabet with my left hand and then the right. I did this over and over until I could realtime the alphabet without hesitation.

If you’re unable to interrupt speakers (in a large setting and this is not a legal proceeding) and you are unable to write verbatim, analyze your group. Are you on a large screen or laptop? On a laptop, I’ll write, “fastest set of lips in the west.” On the large screen, I avoid editing, but if I have to get the message, I drop false starts and repetitions. At first it feels illegal to drop a word. I think this is an art – to write, keep it clean and understandable. One wise reporter said, “When you’re struggling, give ’em the Reader’s Digest version.” I gasped. But if I’m unable to get it all, I know the message is more important than incorrect trans with dashes.

When I’m struggling with a fast speaker or technical material, I focus on writing prefix, root word, suffix, punctuating, hoping my body language doesn’t reveal how much I may be struggling or how much I want to be perfect. Reporters I know browbeat themselves for what didn’t translate. But the audience remembers what enabled them to understand the event. The same personality that drives a person to become a qualified reporter can be hard on the reporter.

Get over your fears. Many reporters tell me they’re certified – a CRR and RMR, they realtime in court or in depositions and are too afraid to begin to realtime on a large screen. Prepare, prepare, prepare. There are so many wonderful resources available now; reach up and out and make the commitment. Understanding that fear is a natural emotion when approaching a new path, you can harness your fear, channeling it as you focus, focus, focus.

Stop hanging around with reporters. Many reporters can be negative about their limitations. Cultivate people who don’t quote 100 percent translation. Look for positive feedback. Be prepared to work for your goal.

As I write, I’m hugged, rubbed, tapped, thanked. They will open their hearts and kitchens to you. If you want to realtime, the work will be serious; so is my commitment. But I’m determined to enjoy some of this while I’m sweating bullets.

So what if you could find one place? What if you wanted to expand your life and skills? What if there was one lost sheep?

I realtime a mass for the Catholic Deaf Community to a large screen, which may be viewed by all who attend the service. There’s a signing priest who voices and signs ASL, American Sign Language (ASL syntax differs) during the mass.

One Sunday I wrote about leaders and Pharisees. The priest’s ASL voiced-words, as he signed were:

“Jesus doesn’t understand about these people. If He knew really who was the sinner, He would avoid them. Jesus gave them a story. He said, what if you have 100 sheep, but lose one? What do you do?“Do you ignore that one and take care of 99 or do you leave 99 and go out and search for that lost sheep until you find him? And you find it, pick it up and put it on your shoulders. Go back, and you announce, ‘Come, rejoice with me! Because my lost sheep, I have found.’

“How many sheep were in that story? The story said 100; 99 stayed home. Maybe that sheep was deaf. He was calling, ‘Come back. Come back.’ God said, ‘Go, look. Find him. Don’t ignore him. Go, look, find him. That one is precious, bring it back.’ Every day, pray, smile, help others. God bless you.”

Parishioners immediately voiced, signed, “Yeah, what if that sheep was deaf? That’s it. Maybe he was deaf.”

And now I ask you: What about that one lost sheep? What if you made a difference to one person? What if you extended your hands and heart one step, one event, one realtimed word at a time? What if you are the one lost sheep?

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!