Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now, Part II of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part II of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 15, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

We agreed to assess goals that had been met as a student and to evaluate where she is now as a certified court reporter.

The court reporter then said (I have permission to share) “When I was going to school then, I was not putting in as much as I should have. Then working with you, I decided I could do this – I really could do this. I decided to not do this and to not do that, but to really do this and to not make excuses. That was how I came a long way. I focused as you advised.”

Thus, we spent our time working together constructively, realistically focusing.

Instead of focusing on the loud voice in her head, we focused on the tasks that would realistically work with her present schedule and her goals now. Today.

Her question “exactly why am I doing this now?” remained with me after we scheduled updates and ended our time together.

This very question itself, in my opinion, will give you freedom.

Have you asked yourself this question and identified what is important?

Have you asked yourself this question on a good day – and not when events are comedy for Saturday Night Live?

I believe this is an excellent question. We take risks when we ask the question, “Why?”

Together we focused on the nutrition for the goals.

The court reporter and I made a conscious choice to create strength with training while working.

What I heard the court reporter say – and what was identified later by her words – were her fears. I heard, “I am afraid …” Her true fears were shared “straight up.”

Yes, I could hear fear in her voice, as well as the frustration.

Part I of III is posted May 1, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 1, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

This individual and I have worked together in the past. She emailed with a question requesting numerous sessions.

Again, I found it interesting that the tenacity and goals that were set by this person while enrolled in court reporting school (her words) “who would never make it out of school fast enough” were now similar to today’s scheduled session.

“I’m not going to spend another dime to improve my skills when I have paid so much to get where I am.” (I remained silent.)

“I know people can do what I am trying to do now. If they can do it, why can’t I? I want – No, I need to earn more money. I didn’t go to court reporting school to be at the bottom of a seniority list with working court reporters after this period of time, did I?” (I remained silent.)

The sentence I truly enjoyed (professionally and personally here), “I’ll just get there and take it from there when I do get there, okay?”

I listened to this gainfully employed court reporter.

“The support on my software is about to expire. I have to pay for that, too. And the support on my new writer is about to expire. More money there! All that adds up to a lot of money and it is due very, very soon!”

The reporter summed it up, “I just am wondering exactly why I am doing this now …”

And there we had it. The dancing zebra in the room was bowing and exiting.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

Part II of III is posted May 15, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

An Alpha State of Mind, Part I of III

An Alpha State of Mind, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
January 3, 2013

Part I of III: Did you know that while your brain is in the alpha state that your muscles, nervous system, and cells have a different pulse per second?

Scientists have discovered that brain waves within the alpha state function at a different level of consciousness, perhaps half the normal rate. Did you know that?

Many of us do know that the alpha state is a “level” people seek while praying and meditating. Children who are taught how to reach alpha levels during chemotherapy have different (good) results while receiving medical treatment. Biofeedback teaches this information, too.

Beta is defined as the “level” needed to function while we are awake. Beta incorporates our five senses. Beta levels may have brain pulses which fluctuate 15 to 20 pulses per second.

A good night’s sleep requires the alpha level. Again, pulses in the brain define alpha.

Alpha levels are approximately seven to fourteen pulses per second. Individuals have defined “intuition” as “a state of consciousness” arising from the alpha level.

Theta is deeper than alpha, involves dreams, and is another “level” we seek to reach during a good night’s sleep. Theta has brain frequencies approximately four to seven pulses per second.

Delta is the deepest sleep level with four pulses or less. Delta levels are documented to be “dreamless.” Many define the delta level as “unconscious” with fewer than four pulses per second. I wonder if anesthesia involves delta. I do not yet know. Yet I learned much as I listened to the conversation, the words I am sharing below.

And this relates to our court reporting field how?

During a job, professionals were discussing the human body, our ability to focus, how we focus, how we store energy, and how our body works with differing brain pulses.

While I was seated in complete listening mode, and our court reporting work posture, one of the professionals who had been speaking, looked to me and was quiet. I paused and waited and waited.

Then the professional said, “Monette, since you are a court reporter, you are able to enter the alpha stage very quickly and very deeply from the beta level. Did you know that?”

Part I of III is posted January 3, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 14, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 28, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

My Village Chief is HOH, Part I of III

My Village Chief is HOH, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I: My village chief sprinted into a parent’s hospital room wearing shorts, sandals (no socks), and a NCAA basketball T-shirt, Saturday morning.

He was all business, dressed casually. When he spoke his first two sentences, I knew. I listened and focused on the voice I know well.

When he turned his head, I saw the aid. Then, I saw the second hearing aid.

He scheduled surgery, shook our hands, left to return to (his words), “What else? NCAA playoffs. You can phone my home; here’s my number. Nothing by mouth after midnight, okay?”

My parent said, “I like him.”

The nurses, “The doctor can’t hear very well. Everyone knows he has problems on the phone.”

I had been quiet. “He has high coping skills. His hearing aids greatly assist him.”

A nurse with IVs and a bleeding cath line, “If you want to speak to him you have to speak loud.”

I said softly, “He is highly trained. Wearing two hearing aids, I have great faith in this man.”

Another nurse, “People have trouble understanding him.”

I did not roll my eyes. My parent asked (knowing I have worked with hard of hearing, HOH, and Deaf since 1993), “Do you think he can hear me, others, and operate with hearing aids?”

I smiled, “Very much so. He will do an excellent job.” The nurses remained silent.

The next morning at 7 a.m. we rolled into pre-op.

I said I would wait in the room for updates.

O.R. staff insisted that I wait in the designated surgical area.

I looked to the surgeon, “No. I’ll wait in the room for your updates.” He nodded; off they went.

Post-op the doctor sprinted into the room, “It’s much quieter in here. Thank you. Now let me tell you what happened.”

I asked if I could write medical terms he was sharing – technical terms – including “this is very bad – could kill … We have a cacophony of bad events …”

He nodded, “I know you’re a court reporter. Sure.”

I wrote new medical words. He gently corrected my spelling. I felt guided.

Then I said, “I need a village chief right now. It’s been so many months with two very ill parents. There’s so many doctors I can’t count. Many do not speak to each other as they ‘round’ giving different orders and meds. If you guide me, I’ll follow. Would you be my village chief?”

He beamed, nodded, and touched my left elbow.

Then he lowered his voice, “May I ask ‘you’ something?”

I nodded.

My village chief pointed to the TV (I had turned captions on), “I know you’re a court reporter, teacher and author; you do that.” (I had not spoken about my work.)

He paused, “Can any court reporter do that?” pointing to flawless live captions.

I ducked my head, thinking … thinking.

He leaned in to hear my answer.

“May I ask you something first?” I asked softly.

Part I of III is posted September 2, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted September 12, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted September 23, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend, Part III of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

I want to highlight and celebrate the life of a dear friend, court reporter, CART provider, and broadcast captioner.

Shelley Darlene Arthur of Vancouver, Canada, was passionate about her work, our profession, and working with deaf, HOH (hard of hearing) and animals.

No one – and I mean no one – could cover your back like Shelley Arthur.

She was a court reporter, mentor, role model, advocate, generous, enthusiastic, spirited, funny, kind, and totally committed to moments involving humans and animals. And she was so loyal to her friends and beliefs, too.

In 2000, Shelley Arthur opened Visual Voice Captions.

Shelley was Level II ASL (American Sign Language), devoted to her work with deaf and HOH.

She was also a dedicated advocate for animal rights. My favorite picture is Shelley swimming with dolphins; she wrote, “And they understand ASL!” on the caption.

As a court reporter, remote and onsite CART provider, captioner, Webcaster, and consultant, Shelley worked in the Senate of Canada, the U.S. Senate, and the United Nations.

She provided court reporting and consulting services, wrote articles, conducted seminars, and served on the BCSRA, British Columbia Shorthand Reporters Association, advisory council.

Shelley traveled (writing me detailed e-mails) to Korea, Sri Lanka, India, the Amazon Rain Forest, and World AIDS conferences in Mexico City, Kenya, and South Africa, sharing her reporting and CART skills.

Shelley was dedicated to (a sampling) Cameryn’s Cause for Kids Society; Sign Language for Children; idratherbeflying.net (Shelley recently spent two months to organize next year’s deaf pilots Fly-In); Representative Organisation of Disabled People in Europe; and International Day of Persons With Disabilities UN Enable, among others.

Shelley Arthur “coined the term ‘UN Enable’ and created their logo with the red ‘e’ in 1998” when she built their first web site. “It was a play on the negative word ‘unable’ to hopefully create controversy and bring attention. It stuck. The term ‘UN Enable’ is now used as the name of the UN global Programme on Disability, and earned a high-level URL: www.un.org/disabilities.”

I want to share the Shelly Arthur I knew.

Part III

When someone contacted me with questions, now and then, I’d e-mail Shelley.

Shelley always replied. Just ask Michelle Coffey in Ireland. Michelle and Shelley (and many others) became friends as Shelley encouraged each with her wisdom and humor.

Shelley was a detail person. She always inquired about my world and knew the names of family members.

When I had animal (and human) questions, she was a go-to person always responding with info and funny comments.

December 5th, 2009, I felt a shift. Truly. I checked my appointment calendar.

I phoned my office. I felt that I was missing something important. I asked a few people to note this “missing something important” – so I could cover my tracks.

Then I rechecked my professional and personal schedule.

When I learned Shelley Arthur died December 5th, I gasped.

At the precise moment I learned about Shelley’s passing, my dog (whom Shelley knew) ran into the room playfully nudging my leg.

This animal had never playfully placed her nose into my thigh while I was near my computer. Never.

I put my head down to digest the news, and my dog continued to playfully nudge my leg – and has not nudged me since.

I reached out to Shelley’s mother, Maureen Connelly Arthur.

Maureen wrote that they dedicated a bench in Shelley’s honor within Spirit Park on Tsolum River.

You are invited to “pause in nature with Shelley.” Donations in Shelley Darlene Arthur’s memory may be made to www.pfne.org, the National Great Pyrenees Rescue.

Maureen, Shelley’s mother, wrote that she was sending me a “small” gift.

When I opened the package, I gasped.

Maureen had chosen a necklace I often observed on Shelley.

When I first saw the necklace on Shelley I softly shared, “I have the same necklace. Before my brother Kevin died, he designed the necklace from a drawing I drew showing ‘how it should look’. The necklace broke after Kevin’s death, August 5, 2000, and it’s now in an envelope. There it remains.”

I remember Shelley giving me a hug. We smiled; no words necessary. Then we went back to work.

Each time I saw the necklace I would smile. Shelley understood.

When I opened the gift from Maureen, and saw the necklace Shelley and I had often commented upon, I had a sudden chill.

There is no way Maureen could have known how special (and unusual) that necklace was to me.

I now have Shelley’s necklace, gifted from her mother Maureen Connelly Arthur, hanging in my office.

And I wrote Maureen thanking her for confirming the unique friendship, the spiritual contract, I had with Shelley.

I now know I did miss something important December 5th, 2009 – Shelley Arthur. I am grateful for all she shared and need to say, “I really miss you, Shelley!”

Shelley’s mother may be reached: Maureen1208@telus.net

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching

http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend, Part II of III

“Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend,” Part II of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

I want to highlight and celebrate the life of a dear friend, court reporter, CART provider, and broadcast captioner.

Shelley Darlene Arthur of Vancouver, Canada, was passionate about her work, our profession, and working with deaf, HOH (hard of hearing) and animals.

No one – and I mean no one – could cover your back like Shelley Arthur.

She was a court reporter, mentor, role model, advocate, generous, enthusiastic, spirited, funny, kind, and totally committed to moments involving humans and animals. And she was so loyal to her friends and beliefs, too.

If there was a new item, a discussion, a fact – positive or perhaps not so positive to our world and to the world of animals – Shelley would write, “Did you see this? You need to read this.” “What do you think about …?” “Check this out!”

She shared her knowledge and talents with people all over the world.

Shelley Arthur had been my friend almost 14 years. We worked and played together; my life is better because of Shelley.

In 1988, Shelley Arthur became a court reporter, opening a court reporting firm. I met Shelley around 1996 when she was very involved in the CART community.

Our CART paths continued to cross and a friendship developed.

She expanded her work to include fulfilling requests and streaming text for disability and educational institutions, businesses, judicial environments, religious services, sporting events, and international arbitrations.

In 2000, Shelley Arthur opened Visual Voice Captions.

Part II

I want to share the Shelly Arthur I knew. As our friendship grew, we learned I was speaking at a convention she was attending. We had never met in person; nor had I seen a picture.

Yet I could recognize her voice from webcasting, remote CART and projects Shelley and I worked on for my company, All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc., www.artcs.com

A group was arriving to greet me at the airport. Unknown to me, Shelley rented a car, arriving early. She was good to go in jeans, petite sneakers and information she wanted to share now! Together, we met the court reporting group and had a marvelous evening.

Shelley lived with Kayla, her Pyrenees boo bear, sharing her home with Ms. Tiggy, a cat. (Shelley wrote about “Sam, the goat, who lives outdoors, staring inside.”)

She was proud to be an Air Force brat and described long transcontinental flights as a child with her sister visiting parents.

Shelley signed e-mails, “Hugs From Shelley & The Critters,” and shared events as Kayla aged to 14 years.

When Kayla deafened, Shelley communicated via sign language.

When I e-mailed, Shelley in Vancouver, she quickly responded.

Often they were snowed in, and she wrote, “but I need to walk Kayla.”

From Texas I would write, “How do you walk a large white dog when you are snowed in?”

Shelley, “First I dug out of the house. Then we walked the riverbank; Kayla saw a bird, enjoyed playing on the drifts. We’re defrosting now. It’s beautiful!”

I flew Shelley into multiple cities to work during NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, conventions within my Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs, www.CRRbooks.com, exhibit booth.

She also helped me when I conducted multiple U.S.A. and Canadian seminars.

I always knew she had my back. Always.

The morning of our first show, Shelley appeared in the exact outfit (matching top, long skirt).

Checking tags on the outfit (yes, same), I saw Shelley’s watch on her right arm – the exact antique silver bracelet watch (with two stones) I was wearing on my left arm.

People questioned if I thought this was odd. I laughed, “Not at all. We’re good.”

Shelley had a great laugh. I have memories of her chatting and laughing with court reporters, teachers, vendors, and court reporting students – bringing someone to meet me – waiting for the moment to step in and say, “Monette, you need to …”

She had such a special gift helping others.

Shelley Arthur knew Reiki healing and after 15-hour days, we would sit quietly, feet up. One evening I gifted her with a hotel full-body massage.

Later Shelley stopped by to thank me. Oh, I had never seen such a smile.

“And the male masseuse was good looking, too,” she beamed.

We would stay post-events two days to wrap-up work and unwind.

As I prepared to fly home, Shelley prepped for two days of travel to return to her Vancouver island home.

She showed me itineraries, which included (my words) big plane, small plane, tiny plane, hotel, car ride, ferry ride, ride from ferry, pick up animals, then ride home. I marveled how she thrived.

Part III is posted May 20, 2010, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend, Part I of III

“Shelley Arthur: Consummate Professional And Important Friend,” Part I of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

I want to highlight and celebrate the life of a dear friend, court reporter, CART provider, and broadcast captioner.

Shelley Darlene Arthur of Vancouver, Canada, was passionate about her work, our profession, and working with deaf, HOH (hard of hearing) and animals.

No one – and I mean no one – could cover your back like Shelley Arthur.

She was a court reporter, mentor, role model, advocate, generous, enthusiastic, spirited, funny, kind, and totally committed to moments involving humans and animals. And she was so loyal to her friends and beliefs, too.

If there was a new item, a discussion, a fact – positive or perhaps not so positive to our world and to the world of animals – Shelley would write, “Did you see this? You need to read this.” “What do you think about …?” “Check this out!”

She shared her knowledge and talents with people all over the world.

Shelley Arthur had been my friend almost 14 years.

We worked and played together; my life is better because of Shelley.

In 1988, Shelley Arthur became a court reporter, opening a court reporting firm. I met Shelley around 1996 when she was very involved in the CART community.

Our CART paths continued to cross and a friendship developed. She expanded her work to include fulfilling requests and streaming text for disability and educational institutions, businesses, judicial environments, religious services, sporting events, and international arbitrations.

In 2000, Shelley Arthur opened Visual Voice Captions.

Shelley was Level II ASL (American Sign Language), devoted to her work with deaf and HOH.

She was also a dedicated advocate for animal rights. My favorite picture is Shelley swimming with dolphins; she wrote, “And they understand ASL!” on the caption.

As a court reporter, remote and onsite CART provider, captioner, Webcaster, and consultant, Shelley worked in the Senate of Canada, the U.S. Senate, and the United Nations.

She provided court reporting and consulting services, wrote articles, conducted seminars, and served on the BCSRA, British Columbia Shorthand Reporters Association, advisory council.

Shelley traveled (writing me detailed e-mails) to Korea, Sri Lanka, India, the Amazon Rain Forest, and World AIDS conferences in Mexico City, Kenya, and South Africa, sharing her reporting and CART skills.

Shelley was dedicated to (a sampling) Cameryn’s Cause for Kids Society; Sign Language for Children; idratherbeflying.net (Shelley recently spent two months to organize next year’s deaf pilots Fly-In); Representative Organisation of Disabled People in Europe; and International Day of Persons With Disabilities UN Enable, among others.

Shelley Arthur “coined the term ‘UN Enable’ and created their logo with the red ‘e’ in 1998” when she built their first web site. “It was a play on the negative word ‘unable’ to hopefully create controversy and bring attention. It stuck. The term ‘UN Enable’ is now used as the name of the UN global Programme on Disability, and earned a high-level URL: www.un.org/disabilities.”

Part II of III is posted May 10, 2010, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

CART: Up-Skills For The Job, And Confidence For The Future, Part 3 of 3

CART: Up-Skills For The Job, And Confidence For The Future,
Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I was posted on Monette’s Musings: www.monettebenoit.com 2/8/10.
Part II was posted on www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com 2/25/10.

Michelle Coffey, Premier Captioning & Realtime Ltd., entered reporting in 1992. She earned her RPR in 1996, and her CRI in 2001.

Michelle also holds a degree in criminal psychology and diploma in counseling from the University College Dublin in Ireland.

Michelle Coffey and I met in Australia in 2000 when I was keynote speaker for the Shorthand Reporter Association of Australia, SRAA.

In Fremantle, I spoke about reporting to the Internet and also working with deaf/Deaf, oral deaf and hard of hearing, HOH.

My seminars were real-timed to a large screen and sign interpreted in Australian sign language, a first.

Our friendship began the day we spoke on a captioning panel. She has the brightest spirit. Michelle truly enhanced the session with her wisdom and humor. Several days later, we bumped into each other – deep within the Australian Bush. A small world indeed.

Michelle Coffey has been a true leader in Ireland.

She has a wonderful can-do attitude. When I see her name in my e-mails, I smile knowing “this is going to be entertaining and good.”

Michelle was the first captioner in Ireland.

No surprise here that she has led another first in her country.

I am honored to share Michelle Coffey’s first CART path within Ireland.

Part III

Michelle Coffey: We spoke to Irish Sign Language interpreters, to Speedtexters, and to note-takers, and in the process we all learned a lot about the pros and cons of all the services.

Next, we spent some time talking to different interest groups, from the National Association for the Deaf, to DeafHear (a hard-of-hearing association), to Irish Deaf Kids, all the way through to the access officers at educational institutions.

And at each point, when we did our “show and tell” the response was always the same, “This is fantastic, why haven’t we heard of it before?”

But the most important people we met were the students who were with us on this new road of discovery.

And it was never far from our minds as we prepared for the beginning of term, that the weight of expectation on us was enormous; from the students that they would get a service appropriate to their needs; from the colleges that we would provide a suitable access solution for their students; and from ourselves and the up-and-coming CART reporters, that we prove that CART services can, and should, be an integral part of accessibility services for all educational establishments in Ireland.

However, much more telling and – proof that this service is necessary and will be a success is a statement from Emma, the first student to take up the service.

After having only two sessions with a CART provider, she had this to say, “I can’t believe the difference CART has made to my life.

Did you know that I began this degree course four years ago but had to drop out because I couldn’t participate in my PBL (peer-based learning) lectures?”

Well, we didn’t know that, but it certainly makes it much easier to study and up-skill for the job when you hear that what you do can has such a profound effect on someone else’s life!

Another fan of the newly available Irish CART services is Caroline Carswell, founder of Irish Deaf Kids, a charity supporting inclusive mainstream education for deaf children in Ireland.

Caroline was new to CART, and its simplicity blew her away.

She said, “For the first time in my life, I could follow a group discussion word for word and contribute without risking a non sequitur. For lip-readers, the law of multiples applies: the more speakers in a group, the harder a discussion topic becomes to follow. It’s like, Chinese whispers, anyone?”

Now, as we look back on our journey to get CART recognized in Ireland, we think “How did we do it?”

Well, did you ever have the feeling that being a member of an organization, whether it’s CARTWheel or the NCRA, is like being a Musketeer? You know, “One for all and all for one”?

Well, that’s exactly how I felt, but the Athos, Porthos and Aramis to my d’Artagnan were some of the most experienced and supremely talented people in our profession. They each gave of their time, expertise and encouragement, instantly and unstintingly when I needed it.

My eternal thanks, and admiration to Dayette Zampolin, Gayl Hardeman and Monette Benoit for their help, advice, vision, encouragement, and even offers to jump in and help out (remotely of course) if we needed it!

Does that not speak volumes about our profession?

Even though our work can be a solitary job, we know that we will never be alone when there are still so many passionate and generous colleagues out there.

And that gives me confidence for the future of our profession!

Michelle Coffey may be reached: www.pcri.ie and michelle@pcr.ie

Monette may be reached for private tutoring and coaching: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR or a state court reporting exam? I want to help you and others to pass your test and to exceed career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivation skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Communication skills and daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and coaching?

• Veteran court reporters, CART providers and captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re falling behind or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students or veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters and captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with one or two key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check It Out: Reach Your Goals! Tutoring and Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit can help you achieve at much high levels. Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life? Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:

As a 25+year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material and an instructor, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, students and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

CART: Up-Skills For The Job, And Confidence For The Future, Part 2 of 3

CART: Up-Skills For The Job, And Confidence For The Future,
Part 2 of 3

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I was posted www.monettebenoit.com, 2/8/10.

Michelle Coffey, Premier Captioning & Realtime Ltd., entered reporting in 1992. She earned her RPR in 1996, and her CRI in 2001.

Michelle also holds a degree in criminal psychology and diploma in counseling from the University College Dublin in Ireland.

Michelle Coffey and I met in Australia in 2000 when I was keynote speaker for the Shorthand Reporter Association of Australia, SRAA.

In Fremantle, I spoke about reporting to the Internet and also working with deaf/Deaf, oral deaf and hard of hearing, HOH.

My seminars were real-timed to a large screen and sign interpreted in Australian sign language, a first.

Our friendship began the day we spoke on a captioning panel. She has the brightest spirit. Michelle truly enhanced the session with her wisdom and humor.

Several days later, we bumped into each other – deep within the Australian Bush. A small world indeed.

Michelle Coffey has been a true leader in Ireland. She has a wonderful can-do attitude. When I see her name in my e-mails, I smile knowing “this is going to be entertaining and good.” Michelle was the first captioner in Ireland. No surprise here that she has led another first in her country. I am honored to share Michelle Coffey’s first CART path within Ireland.

Part II of III

Michelle Coffey: We spoke to Irish Sign Language interpreters, to Speedtexters, and to note-takers, and in the process we all learned a lot about the pros and cons of all the services.

Next, we spent some time talking to different interest groups, from the National Association for the Deaf, to DeafHear (a hard-of-hearing association), to Irish Deaf Kids, all the way through to the access officers at educational institutions.

And at each point, when we did our “show and tell” the response was always the same, “This is fantastic, why haven’t we heard of it before?”

But the most important people we met were the students who were with us on this new road of discovery. And it was never far from our minds as we prepared for the beginning of term, that the weight of expectation on us was enormous; from the students that they would get a service appropriate to their needs; from the colleges that we would provide a suitable access solution for their students; and from ourselves and the up-and-coming CART reporters, that we prove that CART services can, and should, be an integral part of accessibility services for all educational establishments in Ireland.

However, much more telling and – proof that this service is necessary and will be a success is a statement from Emma, the first student to take up the service.

After having only two sessions with a CART provider, she had this to say, “I can’t believe the difference CART has made to my life.

Did you know that I began this degree course four years ago but had to drop out because I couldn’t participate in my PBL (peer-based learning) lectures?”

Well, we didn’t know that, but it certainly makes it much easier to study and up-skill for the job when you hear that what you do can has such a profound effect on someone else’s life!

Part 3 of 3 will be posted 3/8/10.

Michelle Coffey may be reached: www.pcri.ie and michelle@pcr.ie

Monette Benoit may be reached for private tutoring and coaching at Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR or a state court reporting exam? I want to help you and others to pass your test and to exceed career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivation skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Communication skills and daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and coaching?

• Veteran court reporters, CART providers and captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re falling behind or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students or veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters and captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with one or two key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check It Out: Reach Your Goals! Tutoring and Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit can help you achieve at much high levels. Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life? Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:

As a 25+year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material and an instructor, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, students and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

CART: Up-Skills For The Job, And Confidence For The Future, Part I of III

CART: Up-Skills For The Job, And Confidence For The Future
Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Michelle Coffey, Premier Captioning & Realtime Ltd., entered reporting in 1992. She earned her RPR in 1996, and her CRI in 2001.

Michelle also holds a degree in criminal psychology and diploma in counseling from the University College Dublin in Ireland.

Michelle Coffey and I met in Australia in 2000 when I was keynote speaker for the Shorthand Reporter Association of Australia, SRAA.

In Fremantle, I spoke about reporting to the Internet and also working with deaf/Deaf, oral deaf and hard of hearing, HOH.

My seminars were real-timed to a large screen and sign interpreted in Australian sign language, a first.

Our friendship began the day we spoke on a captioning panel. She has the brightest spirit. Michelle truly enhanced the session with her wisdom and humor.

Several days later, we bumped into each other – deep within the Australian Bush. A small world indeed.

Michelle Coffey has been a true leader in Ireland. She has a wonderful can-do attitude. When I see her name in my e-mails, I smile knowing “this is going to be entertaining and good.” Michelle was the first captioner in Ireland.

No surprise here that she has led another first in her country. I am honored to share Michelle Coffey’s first CART path within Ireland.

Michelle Coffey, RPR, CRI: I’m proud to say that Ireland was there at the beginning of court reporting, that is Ward Stone Ireland, who is generally accepted to be the inventor of the stenograph keyboard, as we know it today. But in modern-day Ireland the court reporting profession is under threat, from electronic recording and declining numbers of experienced professionals.

Ireland has a very different court-reporting environment to that of the United States. In Ireland we have a reasonably small number of court reporters; however, we also have a small number of courts in which to work. But when, in the last 18 months, a large portion of the courts moved over to electronic recording, we saw a massive reduction in the amount of available work for the reporters. This caused panic, with many reporters questioning what they were going to do now? How were they going to earn enough money?

All the ‘hard’ questions came to the fore.

We were left with a decision, whether to wade into the ever-shrinking marketplace and vie for work there, or to venture out into an area as yet untried in the Irish market.

The question of whether to stay in a declining marketplace, where everyone will undoubtedly face a decrease in earnings, or to look to a new opportunity which would leave the status quo relatively intact, was simple.

Our answer was CART.

And so, after many months of negotiations, explanations and demonstrations, we are proud to announce that the first-ever CART services have begun in Ireland.

Prior to this, a cart was something pulled by a horse; Irish CART services did not exist. Well, they didn’t!

But once we set out on this road we were determined to change that. So our first job was to engage with the different types of service providers already in this field.

Part 2 of 3 will be posted on Monette’s Musings and www.CRRbooks.com on February 25, 2010.

Michelle Coffey may be reached: www.pcri.ie and michelle@pcr.ie

Monette Benoit may be reached for private tutoring and customized coaching: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR or a state court reporting exam? I want to help you and others to pass your test and to exceed career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivation skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Communication skills and daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and coaching?

• Veteran court reporters, CART providers and captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re falling behind or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students or veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters and captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with one or two key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check It Out: Reach Your Goals! Tutoring and Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit can help you achieve at much high levels. Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life? Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:

As a 25+year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material and an instructor, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, students and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Simple Silence, Part III of III

Simple Silence, Part III of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Simple Silent, Part I was posted 12/8/09, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com
Part II was posted 12/19/09.

Simple Silence, Part III of III:

Again, the topic of sound – or lack thereof – is introduced.

In 1993, when I opened my CART “headquarters” within a sign interpreter’s business, I feng shui-ed my office see if it would generate more revenue.

Hearing and deaf trolled through and parked in chairs, sharing, “It feels peaceful.”

Maybe having been surrounded by music and sound as a child and adult created an opportunity for my choice.

My mother, a special education elementary instructor (certified in two states) and music teacher with an associate’s degree in opera, plays approximately seven instruments. She always played an instrument or brought one home to practice for class lessons.

Her mother, my grandmother, was a piano prodigy who formed her own orchestra in Corpus Christi, Texas. Each musician had to play a minimum of four instruments.

I grew up with a lot of sound. The day that astronauts landed on the moon, my family was traveling and camping in a pop-up tent trailer. We were in El Paso, Texas. My memory is brutally hot – no air conditioning or TV.

That day, my youngest brother, Kevin Drue, bought a (cheap) guitar. In that heat (with no trees in sight), Kevin sat on a barbecue table. I listened as he taught himself to play guitar in that unbelievable heat.

Several hours later Kevin was pretty darn good. Additional information for Kevin may be found: www.captainkevindonnelly.com

And I married a man who plays the guitar – a lot.

The younger generation? Yes, music (and video games) are played – a lot.

Often court reporters have had music lessons prior to entering our profession. This talent can be a plus for students.

Walking into stores now, typically music is now blaring. Studies reveal that people shop longer (with the air conditioning cranked up – even in cooler weather) when music is heard.

While reading e-mails today as I finished this article on sound, I read that several sign interpreting friends were commenting about a new, just-released CD they are purchasing.

One deaf friend wrote, “What is it? Country? Rock? ‘Sounds’ good! Ha-ha.”

Silence, in my opinion, is powerful. This is a conversation I have had with many friends who cannot hear sounds. (Watching – actually staring at – people who “sign” is considered to be eavesdropping as shared with me by the deaf community.) They are my teachers on the subject of sound.

Court reporters, captioners, students and instructors are accustomed to listening to rapid-fire, back-to-back words in talk-over conversations.

Often we think, “When are ‘they’ going to inhale? How long can this pace continue?”

We know people are talking faster in depositions, court, and on TV. The subject has been documented.

As we round the corner for holidays, adding tasks to busy schedules, I want to remind you to listen to simple silence.

The seed I am planting here – silence – as gifted by my deaf friends is “hearing the sound of sound.” I seek to resonate this moment within you. This is my simple silent wish.

Part I and Part II are posted www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit may be reached at: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the
Court Reporting
& Captioning Industry

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA.

She is the author of multiple books and Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, Companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Your Dictionary CD Software Program series.

Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, real-time court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist. She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals.

Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: http://www.artcs.com/

Simple Silence, Part II of III

Simple Silence

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Simple Silent, Part I was posted 12/8/09, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III:

Why am I sharing this special memory? I believe court reporters are sensitive to sound. It is, after all, our bread and butter. Deaf friends have asked, “Is there technology to accurately help me do what you do?”

I slowly shake my head with a smile, “Um, I don’t think so.”

The reply, always, “Me neither; I just wanted to know.” I am surprised how often this conversation evolves.

Another conversation evolves with court reporters and students while I coach and tutor.

I am repeatedly asked, “What are you listening to?”

When I inquire why this is being asked, I hear, “You are very quiet when I speak. Do you have your computer on? Are you doing something else? Do you have music playing?” I am surprised how often I hear these words.

I reply, “When I work – court, depo or CART – I am listening. When I am teaching, coaching, I am listening. This is what we do well. My computer is not on, so I may focus. There’s no music.”

Then I pause for the follow-up, which is sure to follow: “What do you have in the background? Fish tank? Fountain? What do you have for sound?”

I reply, “Silence. I have bird feeders outside. Truly, that’s it.”

Individuals with severe hearing loss (there are degrees) or profound deafness may not have sound.

Silence is powerful. Is that one reason we are comforted walking into church? Close church doors, and you may not hear external sounds. Open those doors, and the world instantly changes.

When people arrive at my office or home often silence is a topic. Adults pause, “What is that? No sound? It’s so silent. I can’t do that in my world or home.”

And some add, “I hate to leave; it’s peaceful, quiet.

Teens comment, “What? No TV, music? What’s up with that? It’s too quiet. Why?” Teens shrug, hands in the air, gesturing their thoughts on ‘no sound’.

Frequently, in the next sentence, individuals say, “I like it; it feels good” – or – they say the complete opposite, “I need something in the background; I could never do that.” (There’s not much middle ground on this.)

Again, the topic of sound – or lack thereof – is introduced.

In 1993, when I opened my CART “headquarters” within a sign interpreter’s business, I feng shui-ed my office see if it would generate more revenue.

Hearing and deaf trolled through and parked in chairs, sharing, “It feels peaceful.”

Maybe having been surrounded by music and sound as a child and adult created an opportunity for my choice.

Part III will be posted 12/29/09 on www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit may be reached at: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the
Court Reporting
& Captioning Industry

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA.

She is the author of multiple books and Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, Companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Your Dictionary CD Software Program series.

Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, real-time court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist. She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals.

Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: http://www.artcs.com/

Simple Silence, Part I of III

Simple Silence, Part I of III

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

I want to plant a seed; simple silence. Silence is powerful. I have Deaf friends (their term) who would not change their deafness. They embrace their world.

A special memory was created when I introduced two people who have been deaf since childhood. I met each through my CART, communication access real-time translation, work. They did not know each other and wanted to meet.

I met my friends for Sunday morning lunch (I called it ‘breaking bread together’) at a golf country club. I was a club visitor. Separately, each spent much time on the golf courses with their families. This was a comfortable environment for them.

While ordering food at the counter (which was then delivered), one friend stood with his hands tucked in his khaki pants pockets, shoulders back and down. He was reading our lips.

My other friend, the young lady, had her hands on the counter, and was reading the menu and watching our lips. She and I were signing (ASL, American Sign Language). He does not sign; he is oral deaf.

My male friend said, voice a tad louder than might have been for the Sunday country club, “Have you ever heard sound?”

I stepped back to watch this communication.

The dude taking our order gasped; golfers stepped away.

She voiced, “I don’t think so. I don’t know.”

My friends looked to me, paused, and smiled ‘ear to ear’.

My male friend who refuses to learn sign said, “I have no sound. Nothing! Never heard sound. Did you?”

She, who signs, said, “Maybe. I might have. I do not remember.”

Within the restaurant and outdoor patio, mature “bruncher” (my term) adults were seated at little round tables wearing tennis and golfing outfits.

Individuals now were ‘frozen’ (similar to within a photograph) – their food and fork suspended midair. Everyone clearly heard this conversation about sound.

Everyone, many with raised eyebrows, waited. No one – and I mean ‘no one’ – moved. I softly giggled and returned my attention to my friends.

My friends wrapped up the conversation, “I wonder what sound is like. Silence is good. It’s all I know.”

The counter-dude had not spoken to my friends while they ordered their lunch. (Yes, I worked to change that.

My friends handled the situation. How? Per their request, I ordered.)

I glanced behind me one more time. (Court reporter reaction, perhaps?)

People were now eating; yet there was no conversation in the room or patio. There was complete silence. People worked to avoid eye contact with us. I remember the moment well. And I ordered a glass of wine (before noon on Sunday), which I slowly sipped watching the moments unfold in real-time.

Part II of III will be posted 12/19/09 on www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit may be reached at: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist
Coach, Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the
Court Reporting
& Captioning Industry

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA.

She is the author of multiple books and Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, Companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Your Dictionary CD Software Program series.

Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, real-time court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist. She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals.

Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: http://www.artcs.com/

Yes, Real-Time Rules, Part II

Yes, Real-Time Rules, Part II

By Monette Benoit
Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Continued from last week: When I was a speaker at a state court reporting association, I addressed this issue. I asked, “Are we embracing the ability to color our hair at home without expenses and blocked time at a beauty parlor?” (The audience roared, “Parlor? You haven’t been to one in a long time, have you? They’re salons now!”) I smiled and asked, “Are we embracing new cameras that capture instant pictures, avoiding a photo shop for printing?”

I watched as people thought about this possibility. I paused and asked softly, “Are others expecting us to change? Are they embracing and expecting more from us? If we have expectations from others, perhaps others seek new possibilities from us?”

Conversations that ensued that weekend revealed, to me, that many did have a ‘shift’ moment – wherein they tilted their thoughts toward the scary (their word), the unknown. Court reporters and students continue to write me about that moment when I respectfully stepped out onto the branch.

This is what we do each day. We step out and reach up. Realtime rules. When youngsters, another new breed, text message with one finger without looking at their gadget (my word) in a pocket, with one finger, ‘we’ are in a different place. Realtime rules.

Court reporters and students who prepare for this reality will exceed those who are “working on it” or “waiting for [fill in blank].”

I strongly believe this: Realtime rules when we have no resistance to this reality.

Our current national, state and international economic events have professionals in many occupations who are questioning what they can do to secure their work, their specialty, and job.

Specifically, I am listening to professionals share that they are scared. I develop custom plans to (re)move fear and progress for(ward to) a new goal.

Realtime rules for court reporters. Yes, I believe (my opinion) alternative technologies will continue to move near our occupation. Have we (not) expanded out to share our skills? We have, and this is a fact.

I often comment, “Anywhere sounds are spoken or muttered, we preserve and record language for history. This is where we excel. Always have. Always will.”

Realtime rules in any situation where we maintain our high accuracy, high skill set, and instant translation rates.

One young professional howled with laughter when I shared my “Realtime Rules” and responded, “Rules? Realtime Rocks! Thank you for sharing. Now I can put that on my dashboard and computer monitor! And I will!”

Next I will share details to personally prepare you for another essential toward this commitment.

Each person I work with shares their wisdom.

The student becomes the teacher; the teacher always learns from the student. This mantra is a firm belief, (my opinion) that I hear every day in my world.

What are your dreams, your goals?

What are (we have multiple from which to choose) your career options? What is your motivation? What is your passion?

Yes, realtime rules for me and for you.

Monette may be contacted: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

About the Author:

CART, Signs, And The Library

CART, Signs, And The Library

By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

This sunny, cool Saturday in January involved a trip to the San Antonio library. My father, with cancer, enjoys listening to books. He rents audio books and purchases library cards to expand the selection, so he can listen to books. This man will not dwell on his illness and now volunteers in the local E.R. assisting triage nurses admit E.R. patients. (“I like helping people,” Emmett frequently shares. “And I want to help others who are less fortunate or in need. I have to get on with my life.”)

Doctors recently told Emmett Donnelly they are unable to explain why or how he is here since 2002. He was told, quote, “Go on, live your life; we can not explain this.” The doctor then shook his hand. We, his family, live white-knuckled, moment to moment; Emmett lives adventure to adventure. The library trip was way up on his list, so he could borrow my card tapping a larger audio selection. Who says no to this request? Not moi.

After lunch, we drove to the library, updated records; I handed Emmett a card for his key ring. (I acquired specs on dad borrowing my card; we were good to go.) Emmett’s eyes lit up; you would have thought he’d won the lottery. Immediately, he headed to the computers. During lunch, daughter answered father-questions to include books daughter is reading; father wanted to share an author he thought daughter should read. Hang in here, comrades, I’m getting to the fate, luck, serendipity, blessings.

Emmett knelt on the floor in front of computer; I sat on a child’s seat as father typed John Dos Passos for daughter. Daughter typed Nigel Tranter for father. The computer displayed ‘author unknown’. I gasped. Nigel Tranter has written over 90 historical novels; I was sure I had mistyped. The lady to my right leaned over, “excuse me” – knowledgeably sharing how to access the city terminal. “Oh,” was father and daughter communed response.

Emmett and I politely listened; then she volunteered, “I come here all the time. I’m finishing my degree online.” I stepped back one step knowing Emmett, guidance counselor, social worker, historian, medic, grammarian, master’s degree in education would bite the hook. He did – quickly.

The lady volunteered, “I come here because I have a visual problem.” We nodded, listening; she shared more information – then she included her child has special needs. (My mother has a master’s degree in special education; I grew up with a sibling with special needs. We know code.) I asked if she was familiar with Jaws (software assisting blind), she nodded, ducked her head, smiling. As she spoke, I thought I saw itmotion; I watched as she placed her right wrist over the left wrist. Yes, I have seen that before.

Sonya (not real name) is new to Texas, her daughter is deaf-blind. Once she shared this information, I asked a question about sign language – watching her wrists. Sonya replied, “Yes, I sign.” Then I went for the answer to the big question, “ASL certified?” Sonya ducked her head, smiled, replying softly, “Yes, Level 5.” (5 is considered ‘master’ ASL level in many areas.)

In one fluid motion, I stepped forward, extended my hand, introducing myself as a court reporter and CART provider who work with onsite and remote sign interpreters. She burst into laughter; I too busted-out. (Another realtime deaf-moment within my world.) Everyone in the library turned and stared – until we stopped our outburst of laughter.

Emmett stepped back two steps (for privacy). I asked if Sonya needed assistance, contacts; did she need people to help her family? Sonya shared personal facts; I listened, then detailed people with whom I have worked in places she mentioned, and we laughed. Again, librarians and others stared. Together we stopped laughing, blinked in unison, smiling.

I asked about her deaf-blind daughter; Sonya shared daily multiple challenges. Sonya and I covered a lot of ground – fast. I gave her my business card for All ARTCS, Inc., All American Real-Time Captioning Services, Inc., volunteering to email names, services I knew would help Sonya’s family.

Sonya giggled then shared her knowledge and skills of ASL (American Sign Language), HandSpeak (www.handspeak.com) and Cued Speed (www.cuedspeech.com).

We breezed through multiple methods to communicate, CART (voice to text), sign interpreters, transliterators (sign to voice), how she handles hospitalizations with her child admitted into pediatrics – communicating with medical professionals and parents with children admitted on her child’s floor – where once one hears there’s a deaf parent or deaf child in the ward, deaf and hearing children quickly sit together on one bed signing away, happy, content, communicating. Softly we giggled together.

A librarian soon hovered four steps away; I frowned at him. Sonya stated her computer time was up; we had to “step away from the computer”. We laughed softer, and I listened as Sonya shared specific needs. In realtime, I was able to further digest, filter, network and share information to help with sign, deaf-blind and CART information, relevant facts – due to many blessings of this occupation and my passion.

I gave Sonya the name of Deaf Link, Inc. (they helped Texas Katrina evacuees with onsite, remote interpreting for six months) for her interpreting needs or possible future employment (herself Level 5). I shared how I met a deaf PGA hotel employee in Phoenix now living here, working with Deaf Link, married to an employee within Deaf Link. Mike Houston, Deaf, is expanding his goal to open international children’s deaf golf camps. Sonya giggled; she ‘got it’ (that instant deaf-connection).

I told Sonya about Frances Dobson, CARTWheel member (www.CARTWheel.cc) within the United Kingdom who has the most accomplished resume and skills of anyone I’ve ever met with reporting and deaf-blind talents. I shared articles I had written for my column.

Sonya asked if I would email all information to her home, so she could use assistive software, adding, “My daughter will be so excited! She loves computers, too!”

Then I commented about her ‘wrist holding the other wrist’ when she first spoke. Sonya smiled, “Yes, I have to do that – otherwise I just sign.” I nodded and thought about the court reporters who find fingers tapping on their lap or steering wheel. Together we stood within the library and giggled softly.

As I said good-bye to Sonya I knew this moment, with my new friend, would benefit both she and her deaf-blind daughter. I welcomed her to Texas. My father had his new library card; Sonya had new facts, information.

I am never, never surprised where or how our skills, knowledge of facts involving CART, sign language, deaf and deaf-blind information can open vast new paths for so many.

Leaving, Emmett quipped, “Well, just another typical day for you, right?” We laughed, and I looked to Sonya – standing in the library alone, waving. Eyes bright, her smile big, I signed my departing message to Sonya, so I would not disturb anyone within the San Antonio library on a Saturday afternoon.

Fate? Luck? Serendipity? Blessings? I know. Now you decide.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

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The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

She Never Speaks; She Spoke To You; Why Can’t She Just Learn English?

She Never Speaks; She Spoke To You; Why Can’t She Just Learn English?

By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

One morning in June, I got an early start. The store was near empty. I had me a 2007 Christmas gift certificate. My mission: new dish towels. I went to the kitchen area. This was easier than I thought.

Avoiding clearance racks, I saw the perfect T-shirt on a shelf. I debated must I? Ahead of schedule I stepped to my left just to look. I spotted a woman who had her head down and was folding a mountain of clothes scattered over a metal table. And I’m talking marine-inspection folding.

The woman looked up; I smiled politely. She nodded and continued folding. I paused long and deliberately before I decided to see if she was the person I thought she might be.

With one motion I made a gesture potentially only Deaf recognize. (It works very well, folks, Big D.) She tilted her head and smiled. Then her eyes sparkled. She did a small dance, head down, hands high in the air, before launching herself over that table to me.

I have not seen Stephie in ten years. Stephie is deaf, lives within the Big D-Deaf world.

I shook out my hands, signing, “Need put down purse. Signing rusty.” Placing my purse, towels on the table, planting my feet on the floor, standing tall, shoulders back, I began to (silently) talk with Stephie.

When I paused to sign or fingerspell, she signed with me, waiting while I struggled or correcting me (so very nice) as needed. This woman, who does not speak, began to laugh. Signing, she began to voice (words) and have sudden outbursts of sounds (words).

As I turned, I spotted employees watching. Customers approached, smiled at me (but not us), and then turned away. I asked Stephie if she might get in trouble for speaking to me. She laughed, “Nope.”

I asked if anyone in the store spoke or signed to her. “No,” she replied.

I asked how she communicates with her co-workers. Only her manager does – and only as needed. Then he ‘writes’ details on a small pad. I asked how she communicates with customers.

Stephie said that she tries to help, but “customers turn away, not responding.”

I winced. But Stephie beamed, stroking my face and hand, “I found you!”

In my rush that morning, I did not put on my wedding ring. She knows my husband from the years he was my “roadie” (his term) every Sunday when I CARTed to St. Frances Di Paola’s large screen for the Deaf mass. Stephie reached for my ringless hand, holding my ringless finger.

She shrugged and with hands in the air, she voiced loudly, “Sorry. It happens.”

I doubled over with laughter. Stephie then voiced, “Oops.”

This Deaf community is tight. When a hearing person is embraced into the Deaf world, it is an honor. In 1993, an elder within the Deaf community, gifted me with a sign name and named me “Our Token Hearing Girl” sharing my CART skills, learning from their culture. Oh, we have funny moments and memories.

Our conversation lasted 20 minutes. Now I was late. We exchanged information.

I signed, “Late. Must go.” She understood. Good-bye lasted 10 minutes with hugs, she touching my arm, my hand.

One employee who watched Stephie and I pointed to her register. I’m still holding only dish towels. Easy, right?

Anna looks like Priscilla Presley, early 1960s. She takes my towels and said, “She spoke to you.”

I blinked and looked at her hair and eye makeup.

Anna, “She spoke to you.”

I smiled, “We’re old friends.”

Anna paused, then leaned on her register, “She spoke to you. I heard her. She said words ‘to’ you.”

I smiled, “Stephie’s deaf. She communicates with sign language. How much do I owe?”

Anna, “She never speaks; she spoke to you. I don’t understand her. I’d like to …”

I almost put my forehead on that register counter. I’m thinking, “Please, God, don’t let this be a mini-deaf sensitivity seminar. I need to head to my office. I have court reporters and court reporting students confirmed for tutoring this morning and afternoon. Peter Rabbit here must run.”

Anna whispered, “You spoke to her. She understood you. She ‘heard’ you. How does that happen?”

I exhaled slowly without sighing. I looked to the people behind me and asked, “Anyone in a hurry?”

Each person (a first) shook their head.

Customers replied, “I have all the time in the world.”

“I’ve always wanted to learn about sign language — those deaf mutes.”

When I looked up — as I knew would be — Stephie watched, head down. She understood. I made eye contact with Stephie and smiled.

I slowly began my mini-seminar. “Stephie is an intelligent woman to work in a place where no one speaks her language – or will try.”

Anna asked, “But why do her words come up in wrong places?”

Me, “Well, Anna, her language ASL, American Sign Language, is a conceptual language created by hearing people long ago in France.”

Anna, “Why can’t she read lips? She stays to herself. She seems nice.”

I asked, “Has anyone here ever sat with her in the break room?” Anna shook her head. “Stephie wants to communicate,” I said.


Anna earnestly, “But sometimes her words don’t sound like English, yet you understood what she was saying. I watched. You two had a real conversation. Some words are louder than they should be. Can’t she just learn English?”

I winced. Calmly, I took a deep breath, shared tips about Big D, Deaf, sign language. “Stephie does know English. Her first language is ASL.”

Placing my towels in a store bag, I asked for the total. Customers leaned forward to listen when Anna whispered, “I wish I was brave enough to do what you did with her.”

Slowly counting to myself, I softly replied, “Start with one word. When you see her on break, coming into work or leaving, start with one word.”

I showed Anna several signs (and a few funny slang signs) to encourage and motivate her. I added, “And it’s fun.”

Anna finally totaled those dang towels and said, “Thank you for helping deaf people and for taking time to help us – who wish we could understand them.”

Me, “But you can.”

Anna, “No, no, I wish I could, but I can’t. Thank you for helping me and for helping us to understand.”

With one quick, shy motion, Anna raced around the counter and hugged me. Then she sprinted back to her register. Customers then thanked me “for helping those people.” I avoided sighing.


I closed the seminar, “Deaf have a wonderful culture with a beautiful language. We must learn from each other.”

I slowly looked down the aisle; I knew she was watching. Stephie nodded. She understood. I signed good-bye to Anna. Overhand I signed (the personal) “I love you” to Stephie. I took my towels and departed with my head down. I wondered what I could have or should have said to her coworkers to have had a more positive result.

Then a large UPS truck flew past me. Stopping on a dime, the driver leaned out the doorless truck and waved overhand. I blinked. Last year, he was stung by a bee at his previous delivery. He’s allergic to bees. After I signed for my delivery I treated his neck ‘timing’ to see if his bee reaction would need hospitalization.

While watching this UPS shorts-wearing dude with dark eyeglasses, energetically waving overhand to me, I thought about Anna and how wonderful it was to have found Stephie. I thanked God for life’s grand memory-moments.

Then like the little Peter Rabbit, this bunny went back to her world – thankful for Stephie’s friendship and her laughter that morning.

I phoned the sign interpreter Stephie requested, sharing Stephie’s message.


My friend howled with laughter, “Dish towels with a 2007 Christmas certificate? Oh, Monette, you need to shop for better things. What ya doing tomorrow? Let’s meet there, see Stephie. Let’s go have us some real fun over there.”

Perhaps we did; perhaps we did. Stephie and I wish Happy Holidays to each of you and your families.

Hurricane Katrina – Deaf Link, Remote Sign Interpreting – Drop, Roll, Run Forward, Part III

Hurricane Katrina – Deaf Link, Remote Sign Interpreting
– Drop, Roll, Run Forward, Part III

By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Hurricane Katrina continues to dominate the news. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Kay Chiodo, Deaf Link personnel, and I kept our heads down as facts were initially broadcast 24/7.

We listened, working to help others, incorporating new technology, working with emergency national, state, local agencies and volunteer organizations – all grouped overnight in numerous locations – to include abandoned facilities.

Sometimes the only thing one can do before jumping into a new trench is listen – unless that person is deaf or hard of hearing.

As 2006 began, writing this article in February, we continued to sort facts with what was shared, what could be shared …

I am still humbled by what we learned — what could have, should have and might have ‘been’ done – to help more, to do more.

Now we know. Now we know. Yes?

Deaf Link installed remote sign interpreting setups within multiple San Antonio, Houston and Dallas shelters – sometimes without cooperation of all people involved.

In some cases, no one seemed to be in charge; many ‘real-time’ decisions were precedents.

Sometimes, after Deaf Link had worked with people in charge explaining the need and technology, a new group or person was in charge only hours later, and we would be back to square one.

Deaf Link created 24-hour remote sign interpreting as approximately 750,000 people arrived in Texas. Many of us watched TV late at night to see what was unfolding – what was being shared. Many of us were on the phone with each other to ‘hear’ and document what was unfolding.

(Part I and II may be found at www.CRRbooks.com and www.monettebenoit.com with direct links included below.)

Kay and Deaf Link were on the road six days, “Your own time; your own dime.”

Converged Technology Application Partners assisted Deaf Link’s installations. CTAP, Deaf Link’s tech support, met Kay, installing Deaf Link’s equipment. Yet Kay still wishes she could have done more.

Kay Chiodo, Deaf Link’s CEO, is the consummate person to drop, roll and run.

Deaf Link helped HOH, hard-of-hearing, who lost hearing aids.

Many HOH lost their hearing aids when batteries became wet or ran down. Often HOH sat alone, waiting, not asking for help. They sat, waiting.

Announcements blared: “If your social security numbers ends in –, go to –.”

Hard-of-hearing individuals (with good aids) heard garbled announcements.

Those who are deaf, of course, didn’t hear the messages at all and did not know information was being shared within each facility.

Deaf individuals volunteered to help deaf evacuees communicate, and deaf volunteers used Deaf Link’s technology to talk to (hearing) people in charge.

When Kay hit Dallas, Deaf Link’s lines initially were in medical areas. Then FEMA requested a location near Deaf Link. FEMA realized deaf were not receiving housing and social security services.

“There were many other services people needed access to other, in addition to medical.”

Security also utilized Deaf Link, 24/7.

In a few instances, after lines were dropped and Deaf Link had helped people and continued to serve new arrivals, without notice – deaf were moved, relocated.

Each time, deaf and HOH (hard-of-hearing individuals) would have to be found and the process had to begin again.

One day, deaf were organized to be sent to another facility where higher medical care was needed.

Deaf, however, wanted to stay in public arenas to be near children, families and – their quote – “normal” people. Deaf didn’t need higher care or want to be segregated.

Within the KellyUSA facility, some thought it would be great to have deaf only in one area. Many of the deaf adults and children had endured traumatic experiences with hearing during the storm and travels – people they became attached to – and they requested to remain with those new friends.

Deaf evacuees, already traumatized, were often separated from family or friends prior to arriving at shelters.

Facts shared, too, that that blind with working dogs were separated from their ‘ears’ when the dogs were not allowed on the bus after mandatory evacuations. (One incident documents, fact, that a working dog was shot when the blind person would not leave the dog.)

Kay went to KellyUSA’s security, explaining their communication mode is here.

“It’s important they remain with people they bonded with. KellyUSA understood. Whoever was trying to move deaf, dropped it.”

“At the Astrodome, some felt deaf should be gathered and herded.”

Kay can see how that “may be logical to some, but unless they could take hearing people deaf were attached to with them, it would be a challenge. They did move deaf – to another location away …”

“Everyone had good intentions, but it came down to asking the person. No one can make a group decision like that; it’s an individual preference. People were giving their best to everybody. Once services were established and deaf knew where everything was – all deaf had to do was sign they were deaf – using our technology, they instantly had equal access!”

“Deaf, HOH, deaf/blind, people non-English-proficient taught us to be prepared. Through their suffering, they paved the way for a nation to be better prepared. We learned, and Monette, sometimes the hardest lessons are the best learned.”

“Deaf Link was communication accessible alerting Texas deaf and HOH, a first in the nation, for Hurricane Rita, almost three weeks after Katrina.”

Writing these articles on Hurricane Katrina and Texas volunteers, I confirmed Deaf Link never received compensation for their services in any Texas shelter. Reluctantly, after three months, they removed all equipment in December 2005.

When Hurricane Katrina yellow buses originally rolled into Texas, I assisted with information-coordination.

Many court reporters, professionals, HOH (hard of hearing) contacted me asking what they could do.

I worked with sign interpreters gathering facts, stats, listing new shelters within Texas as they were created in real-time.

I continued to phone Deaf Link’s San Antonio office asking, “Now what? What’s next?”

Hours were devoted to which mayor was having a press conference, which group, company, church or agency would or would not be assisting – Who was really in charge?

Sometimes we heard things we could not repeat – (and still can’t).

Often we kept our head down, just as we started, working to help. Sometimes we just listened to each other.

Volunteers were having nightmares. Many felt guilty for not being able to do more. We were having sleepless nights; we needed to eat before accepting new Katrina assignments.

We did not discuss each was turning down ‘real work’ (compensated jobs) to help – many were passionate in their need to volunteer.

After weeks, sometimes numb and stunned, we continued to volunteer, listening, sharing time with each other – while thousands continued to stand in lines seeking food, their family and their loved pets.

After listening and sharing, we would focus back to our task, moving forward with our next Katrina request.

One night Kay phoned, “We’re having a sleepover. Bring your pillow, Monette. Really.”

Running remote services in each shelter, volunteers slept on the floor in her office. Not one complained; each person was thankful to put in more hours.

I gathered detailed information to send donations to deaf/HOH in each Texas city including shelters, churches, deaf volunteers, HOH, special-needs patients.

Most requested items were Bibles, toys, batteries and shampoo (in that order). Socks, underwear and bras sold out in San Antonio, the 8th largest city in the United States.

Eleanor Mitchell, RPR, of Washington emailed me, then typed a sheet asking for donations, which she distributed in her neighborhood. Eleanor mailed her neighbor’s donations to Texas.

Jean Melone of New Jersey wrote asking how she could help. Students in her school, Steno Tech Career Institute, gathered items, then shipped their donations to Texas.

Jeff Hutchins (the man who helped to invent broadcast captioning, and in my opinion, did more to tip our entire occupation) sent an email to me, “How can we best help?”

Jeff forwarded my reply to Accessible Media Industry Coalition.

Jennifer Tiziani of SHHH, now HLA (Hearing Loss Assocation) in Northwoods, Wisconsin, and many SHHH members responded, mailing items “from their closets and homes.”

One deaf woman responded to an email I wrote Jeff. She wrote me offering to share her small New York City apartment with a deaf family.

Many, many emailed me that sitting in their dry home, dry town, listening, they had to do something.

Some wrote me that all they could offer was prayers.

You need to know: You did make a huge difference. Deaf Link did pave a new path. Our work is not yet done. Bless each of you who donated your time, your passion, your hearts and your ears.

“There but for the grace of God go I.”

Kay Chiodo may be reached through www.Deaflink.com, 210-590-7446.

‘Hurricane Katrina – Deaf Link, Remote Sign Interpeting; Drop, Roll, Run Forward, Part I,’ March 2006 may be accessed on http://crrbooks.com/newsdesk_info.php?newsdesk_id=53

‘Hurricane Katrina – Deaf Link, Remote Sign Interpeting; Drop, Roll, Run Forward, Part II,’ April 2006 may be accessed on http://crrbooks.com/newsdesk_info.php?newsdesk_id=54

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Fingers, Ears, and Heart Wide Open

Fingers, Ears, and Heart Wide Open

By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Court reporters and court reporting instructors are fascinating!

Court reporting students have wonderful stories to share with detailed triumphs and challenges each has overcome. And I believe this is what makes this profession so wonderful.

During the NCRA (National Court Reporters Association) Teachers’ Workshop, I was enjoying dinner in a fine restaurant. My companions shared thoughts and ideas. While Cecilee Wilson spoke, Gayl Hardeman, Laura Taylor and I listened intently.

As we dined and I listened to Cecilee, I knew court reporting students and working court reporters, CART providers and broadcast captioners would want to know this true story.

Each day as I tutor experienced court reporters and court reporting students, I affirm that we are each talented in our unique way. Cecilee Wilson expanded my world and now here I share with you.

Cecilee Wilson, RMR, CRR, is a captioner and CART provider. She is inspirational. Cecilee finished school in Bountiful, Utah, and married her high school sweetheart. Her husband told her about co-workers attending reporting school. They were going to work a little and retire early because of the money.

“Then he said, ‘Bet you can’t do that,’” recalls Cecilee.

Cecilee enrolled. “I didn’t do well; others were better. I’d rather go to the dentist and get teeth drilled without Novocain than go to (court reporting) class.”

She and her husband joined the Air Force. They were stationed in New Jersey. She enrolled in Harris School of Business. Cecilee discharged after her daughter’s birth. They were transferred to England, then Salt Lake. She transferred to Abilene and enrolled in the Stenograph Institute of Texas.

She worked hard, passing a test each week until December, took time off to have her third baby girl, returned in January and passed the RPR in May 1977. Cecilee moved back to Salt Lake City and continued reporting.

She split with her husband after 14 years and five children, including a four-month-old son. On her baby’s six-month birthday, Cecilee’s neighbor asked if she wanted a ride on his Harley.

A car pulled out. “I heard the boom and blacked out.” She remembers saying, “Well, I’m not dead, that’s good.”

She gave herself a physical. “I needed a Band-Aid on my hand. If my feet would get the feeling back, I’d go to work tomorrow.” It was dark. She couldn’t see the bones sticking out of her hand and didn’t know both feet were broken.

Her right hand was pinned and casts were put on both legs. The pins were removed and “my divorce was final the same week. A friend offered to line me up with some guy.”

Cecilee was readmitted with an infection in her arm. “MY friend wanted me to meet him. My blind date consisted of her and her husband bringing him to the hospital. He joked I was a cheap date. We got married in three months.”

Within two years, they had a baby. “Eight kids: five mine, two his and one ours,” she says.

She was out of work nine months with three surgeries and physical therapy. Cecilee recovered “almost all of my hand. I was a reporter again.”

She wanted to caption in 1989 but hit dead ends.

“When my mother died in ’92, I used my inheritance for everything—captioning software, encoder,” she explains.

“I called a station and told them I’d caption pro bono the governor’s state of the state address. The station decided to caption a script, but kept my card. In March, Easter Seals was looking to caption their telethon. The station gave them my card. I captioned 14 hours in two days. Soon I captioned the University of Utah’s football games, which led to Utah Jazz and University of Utah basketball. And I was still working in court.”

During her second Jazz season, the Utah Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing phoned.

“They had seen my blurb at the end of games.”

She met with the council. They took her to meet the TV station general managers. Nobody was interested then. Later she was contacted by a general manager who wanted to caption—the next week.

“I was walking out the door for a trip to Hawaii.” She negotiated from her hotel and started the next week. Six months later she took on another station.

She worked all day in court, wrote the 5:30 news from her office, drove home and wrote the 9 and 10 p.m. news or a three-hour game. She finished at 11:45 p.m. one night with a game in overtime and trial the next morning.

“Clearly this was killing me,” says Cecilee. “I had to quit court; the rest is history.”

Cecilee now has six grandchildren, three girls, three boys.

She spends her free time knitting, crocheting, spinning, and quilting.

They raise sheep. “As lawn mowers for pasture; in the spring we shear them. I spin the wool, as time allows. We put some in the freezer. When my kids want to know what the name is of the new lamb, we say, ‘Dinner’. It keeps the in-laws from visiting, especially when they know the Thanksgiving turkey is grown in our yard.”

Her husband, Leroy, has a degree in ceramic art and currently is earning a degree in education. He wants to teach. “He does all the cooking,” she says. “Sometimes he brings me food while I’m captioning.” During a Salt Lake City tornado, she was on-air four hours with no commercials. He brought sodas with a straw and held them for her.

One year, she “thought it would be cool to make an NCRA centennial quilt and donate it to the NCRF auction.” NCRF sent past logos.

“That became the main design. I have quilt frames behind my chair. During commercials, I have a hard time doing nothing for two minutes. I turn around, quilt, drop the needle and caption again.”

As she recounted these details, my Pittsburgh dining companions and I listened. You could’ve heard a pin drop at our table. I slowly sipped my glass of wine, wide-eyed as she spoke.

I asked Cecilee what motivates her.

“The only thing remarkable about me is that I am very unremarkable. People have supported and helped me. I am continually thankful.”

What keeps her smiling?

“I think my life is a reflection of love of God and Jesus Christ—God for allowing me trials and giving me strength to overcome them; Jesus Christ for giving me His example and being my savior. That’s really the truth.”

I’ll always remember her gracious big smile and gentle laugh.

Cecilee Wilson is way beyond any comfort zone. Ears, fingers, heart and wise soul, wide open, sharing truly and purely.

Monette Benoit may be reached at: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!