HLAA

You All Start In CART Now, Right?

You All Start In CART Now, Right?

~~ Originally published in my column “Beyond The Comfort Zone” within NCRA’s Journal of Court Reporting, JCR
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved

An invitation to join friends (each working in college student services) for lunch with their colleagues began with introductions. I selected the restaurant, away from busy “spots” as many were new to this city.

While chewing my sandwich, a college disability coordinator, asked, “Monette, you’re a court reporter, right?”   I nodded.

“Monette, you’ve provided CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) a long time, right?”
I nodded, still chewing my food.

The third question was the stun-err-roo when a woman seated at our crowded table asked, “Monette, (long pause) all court reporters ‘start’ in CART, right?”

I blinked hard and looked to my friends. They gave me a blank look; I sensed this topic had already been discussed prior to this gathering.

I did not nod. I sipped my tea, tipped my head. Thinking. Thinking.

The professional then said, “All court reporters start in CART now, right? That’s where they get their training, so they can then go into court and get other good work, right? It’s a simple question.”

Oh, Lord!  My simple lunch was now halted as each person awaited my reply.

I worked to not appear stunned – now wearing my court reporter face that we know well.

I replied with a question – asking if each person is familiar with CART.

I was thinking how to answer a simple question that did not appear to be simple to the individuals waiting for my words.

And I felt they knew it was not a simple question, too, due to the manner it was asked, and the complete silence at the table.

“We want to know if this is where all court reporters now begin their work? It’s the place to start now, right?”

Again, I looked to my friends.

Not one person offered any words to assist me. Nope. I was clearly on my own.

Slowly, I shared, “Our realtime skills now afford court reporters, CART providers, and captioners multiple opportunities. Many professionals work in multiple venues. We are trained with specific skills, earn certifications, attend conventions …” No one was eating now.

Then they began to share, “We have found that the CART individuals now providing CART for many colleges and universities are clearly learning how to.”

I did not ask the name of companies or individuals providing CART captioning.

This gathering was not a continuing education seminar. Nor did I want to miss the opportunity to share the wonderful services we do provide, 24/7.

I also did not ask the “visiting professionals” the questions I might have asked my friends.

I wanted to ask if they or their schools had gone with the lowest bid and was the work provided by individuals who have completed court reporting school.

I watched my friends who had invited me to this gathering. (They schedule CART captioning for their students.)

I know that a few, perhaps, had been paying experienced CART providers and now are permitting students to provide CART to earn school credits.

Since that discussion was not tossed onto the table, I decided to avoid that scenario entirely – unless it was brought up.

In another forum or within a scheduled meeting, those questions – might have been appropriate.

This was still the light, breezy lunch in a quiet location (their words) “to get away from work and work topics” – yet, this was gifted to me.

Part of me wanted to say, “Okay. Bring it on. Let’s go there. Amplification? Microphones? Where? On professor? Near the student? Near the person hired to capture words for realtime display? Acoustics? Classroom or auditorium? Prep given to CART captioner? CART provided over net? Using what? Have you ever asked the CART captioner if they need anything to provide their services?  Does the consumer wear a hearing aid?  Cochlear implant?  Is rough ASCII provided at end of class -or multiple days later – as may be requested by someone not experienced…?  Is CART captioner able to communicate directly with consumer?  Is the verbatim text for one student or many?  Laptop or overhead projection?”

Oh, I had questions.  Multiple.

I decided not to defend our work or to ask the above multiple questions. I was not their lunching CART consultant that day. (If you disagree, I wish you had been at that table.)

I know that many “coordinators” working in student services departments answer to others – yet, others are often not part of student services. Having worked in a (very) large college and private schools, I know there are often many “chiefs” – not just one.

I succinctly shared that we provide onsite and remote services. Communication with the student, scheduling department, instructor, student, and CART captioner is essential. Then I smiled, picked up my sandwich, and continued eating.

Were we done?

No.  (Darn.)

Several individuals began to discuss their “multiple problems” and “CART beginners” they are working with now as they were still “convinced that this is where all court reporters now begin their work.”

I listened. Continued sipping my tea.

When I was again asked for my thoughts, I did not sigh. I did not roll my eyes.

I asked each person to write down the NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, web address and also to contact their state court reporting associations.

In unison, they replied, “We’ve never considered doing that.”

I asked that they “remember that we – court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners – are trained with outstanding skills and discipline that might knock your socks off if you knew what we lived through each minute, each day to prepare us to share our professional work.”

Then I was asked if I knew where they could get cheaper notebooks “for our transcribers, students, who write on carbons for other students.”

My reply? “Nope. Can’t help there.” Then I put more food in my mouth.

When the waiter brought the ticket, several lunches [sic] gave me their cards.

As we departed, I calmly walked to my friends and quickly pinched each person.

I said, “Gee, thanks. A simple heads up or any assistance to avoid me holding a court reporting – CART captioning seminar might have been nice.”

They howled and said, “Monette, this was what they needed to hear – what we all needed to hear. Maybe you could write an article about this, so court reporters know that we, disability and student services coordinators, find there to be such a large difference in skills among the CART writers. That’s all.”

Yes, I pinched each again, maybe harder than the first pinch.

Ah, when we are enjoying a casual meal, a relaxing moment, our work may still become an opportunity for education and advocacy.

One of my positive takeaways, which I did not share with the individuals, was that I was impressed they knew the word “CART.”

They did not say “captioning” as in days of old.

Though I would have liked to have heard a positive comment, they were aware that the colleges were providing this “service” because we have to, per law…  “And there’s that,” I avoided saying.

Alone, I focused on the advocacy of all our years of work and thanked the Lord that the lunch was over. Oh, yes, I did.

—- Monette, named the Court Reporting Whisperer by students, may be reached:  Monette.purplebooks@CRRbooks.com

Purple Books – Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com   * Advance skills, pass NCRA and State exams the 1st time

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal, CART Captioner, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Since 1990: Multiple Title Author of Books & Purple Books Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART Captioning Profession

An American RealTime/Captioning Services, LLC: www.ARTCS.com        Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a State exam?  More than once?   Purple Books “Done in One” has a 98% successful pass rate on exams with sets as evidenced by thousands of students and professionals who pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test.   Testimonials: www.CRRbooks.com.

Reach Your Goals:  http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29  Where do you want to go? Specific custom-designed guidance will efficiently assist you!

About Monette Benoit:    As a 30+ year court reporter, CART captioner, author of NCRA and State test-prep material, instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and 225-homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands challenges many adults face in our industry.

In 1993, she began to CART caption to a large screen for a Deaf mass, San Antonio, Texas.  Wonderful opportunities then presented from Big D, Little D, Oral Deaf, HOH consumers -each with special moments.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART captioners, students, instructors. She has helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is an informative, motivational, and funny blog for busy professionals and students who seek to create their success and who seek to enjoy this special path.

 

 

01 May 2020

CART Captioning And The $10,000 Spaghetti Dinner – Monsignor Balty Janacek

CART Captioning And The $10,000 Spaghetti Dinner

~~ Originally published in my column “Beyond The Comfort Zone” within NCRA’s Journal of Court Reporting, JCR
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved

The CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation) community and all court reporters lost a devoted friend on April 30th, 2007. My life and our profession were improved by this gentleman.

I had been CARTing San Antonio’s St. Francis Di Paola Deaf Mass for many years.

One Sunday morning before a mass, privately a new priest introduced himself, spelling his name B-a-l-t-y.

He waited for me to stop writing to shake my hand (I was CARTing with steno machine) — He charmed parishioners with this gesture.

Then the new priest walked to the altar, and introduced himself to the Deaf community, “I’m the new priest and will learn sign.”

We welcomed him with deaf applause.

Balty was proud of his Czech background. He had a deep love of cultures and languages.

He often spoke Spanish while I realtimed – writing verbatim text projected to a large screen on the altar from my steno machine.

I’d sigh; he’d smile and then translate.

As we became friends, I learned Balty was ordained in 1950.

Serving multiple roles he was devoted to causes close to his heart.

Balty remained involved with Native Americans and tirelessly worked to mediate retrieval of their remains, bones, from the University of Texas at San Antonio, UTSA.

I am not surprised that he donated his body to UTSA.

Balty was parochial vicar at San Fernando Cathedral (where Davy Crockett is buried).

Since 1967, he was director of four 18th-century Old Spanish Missions for the Archdiocese (the active parishes of Concepcion, San Jose, San Juan, and Espada Missions).

Balty established the San Antonio Mission National Historical Park and a historic cooperative agreement with the National Park Service, which the NPS is working to model around the United States.

His picture was in our newspaper so often that I’d phone Balty teasing him that he was my “Where’s Waldo?”

Balty was absolutely devoted to his extended family, organizing Schulenburg, Texas, reunions with nieces and nephews.

I extended multiple holiday invitations, but he’d say, “I want to spend time with the girls (nuns). I’ve known many for 50 years; they’re good cooks. Can you understand?”  Yes.

Much later when he handed me his business card, I saw his title Monsignor Janacek. I almost gasped.  Me, “I didn’t know…”

He shrugged, “Balty – really.” Balty was the “jolly” man who arrived with his peace sign.

One Sunday, Balty asked my former husband and me to lunch.

He asked me what I needed to CART for the Deaf. (CART is communication access realtime translation.

I used my equipment writing to a large screen with instant translation for the Deaf mass.)

‘Then husband’ did not hesitate, “Her equipment is seven years older since she began to volunteer. She has wear and tear on her equipment.”

I blinked, immediately swallowing warm Black Eyed Pea cornbread.

Balty smiled, “How much would it cost for the church to purchase new equipment? Monette, could you use our equipment?”

Balty and my husband wrote numbers on paper napkins as I watched.

Then Balty turned to me, “How about $10,000? Would that work, Monette? What do you need? The Christopher Columbus Society is having their spaghetti dinner. I’ll ask them.”

Lunch was wonderful, and we never ventured back to the topic as we laughed and enjoyed our time together that sunny day.

Church members were accustomed to me rushing up aisles 15 minutes before our Deaf mass.

To prep equipment, I darted around people praying, families posing for pictures after baptisms and other church events.

Parents and parishioners prevented small children from playing with my equipment, understanding my frantic movements each Sunday.

Soon Balty called, “They agreed!”

This event is famous.

Politicians and judges arrive to shake hands. Spaghetti is homemade; all you can eat. I attended and was thanked by lines of volunteers serving family recipes.

Balty waved at me as I stood in line – signing, joking, receiving my hugs and shoulder rubs (a Deaf ‘thing’).

Then, he sat at our long table as we ate our spaghetti. He was busy laughing and listening and enjoying the event.

Balty purchased all my hardware and court reporting software.

I prepared paperwork; he cut checks. We were a good team, and Deaf were thrilled everyone supported their community.

I have wonderful memories of Balty.

I fondly remember when Balty casually commented that women should have rights to become priests. (His predecessor preferred ‘only’ Latin masses and fasting.)

I paused before stroking “those” words.

Parishioners paused, too – looking to my large screen, narrowing their eyes. My hands poised above my steno keyboard,

Balty looked at me and slowly nodded.

As I realtimed his words, Balty paused, too.

After a long silence, people coughed, looked to one another, and then looked up to my (large) screen at the (large) all upper cap text.

Then, small groups stood and ever so slowly side-stepped to the center aisle.

They gave him one slow final look before each quietly and politely exiting the church that morning.

Later I teased Balty, “Well, you won’t be seeing the front of their faces any time soon. Before you arrived, standing room only.  Now?  Wide open spaces.” He smiled, eyes soft.

I phoned Balty when remarkable events occurred.

I was honored how he shared his life – on and off the record. I became protective of Balty as he detailed his world, expanding mine.

In 2000, I moved away from San Antonio. (I returned 2002.) The National Court Reporters Association’s, NCRA, 2001 mid-year was in San Antonio, so when I flew in, I went to my room and immediately called Balty, “I’m up the road.”

Balty instantly recognized my voice, “Monette, hi; I’ll hurry this wedding rehearsal and be right there!”

The hotel lobby had open seating. He ordered “two glasses of your finest wine.”

He raised his glass and began singing to me. Balty had a deep melodic voice; he sang in Spanish.

(Balty did not lower his voice; crystal wine glass held high, he sang.)

Stunned, I watched others watch me before I relaxed, listening. When Balty finished, he raised his glass higher and toasted me.

I whispered, “I don’t understand what you just sang. It sounded beautiful.”

Balty laughed, “Monette, I sang a love song to you.”

I blinked hard.  A. Really.  Hard.  Blink.

Balty smiled, “I sang this song to thank you for all you’ve done. I sang so you will always remember this moment.

As we dined, court reporters trolled and stopped to chat at our table.

(Balty wore a solid black shirt. I watched Balty remove his white collar the moment he entered the hotel. I teased him about being off-duty.)

Bill Weber was incoming NCRA president. His board of directors had driven into the Hill Country to film a movie for his induction.

I proudly introduced NCRA directors, many wearing country overalls, to “the man who raised $10,000 with spaghetti to purchase CART equipment.”

Every court reporter thanked him. Oh, how Balty laughed and smiled. His eyes twinkled, and he enjoyed every moment.

Hours later, court reporters stood at the elevators waving good-bye to my friend – their new friend Balty, B-a-l-t-y, he would spell his name.

Balty waved – waiting for me to get into an elevator. I waved – waiting for him to leave. And we met more people at those elevators.

He and I waited for the other to turn.

We spent hours at the elevators talking, laughing and having great fun as I introduced Balty to many friends.

Court reporters still comment on that moment when they see me.

When diagnosed with leukemia, Balty was optimistic.

I’d phone his private cell phone; he’d answer, “Hi, Moe-net!”

I could hear Spanish in the background, and he was frequently in a southside clinic “waiting to be seen.”

Once I joked that he’d spent more than 50 years visiting hospitals – perhaps he could get an appointment.

Softly Balty said, “Monette, I’m with my people; this is where I want to be.”  Ahhhh.  Yes.

I encouraged Balty to record his memoirs.

I wanted one tape for the church and another detailed version for his family, describing historic, momentous events he transformed.

I teased him that he should have a glass of red wine and sit and talk. I knew his family would want these tapes.

We kept in touch as Balty rounded the last corner of his life.

I would phone his cell phone, and we would laugh and listen to the other.

I always had his name on my to-call list. Each Monday, I put his name on my list.

His last Sunday, April 30, 2007, I had phone in hand dialing his number that afternoon when I was distracted to a family moment. I put the phone down.

I knew I would find the time to phone him. His name remained on my list.

I did not know that Balty recently left his archdiocese apartment.

Alone, he checked into hospice.

I did not know he had few visitors.

That Sunday he “snuck out to a Mexican restaurant with his family; nuns looked the other way.”

Later, he watched Spurs basketball on TV – they won.

Monsignor Balthasar Janacek died that night at 80 years of age.

I learned from his family, “When the nurse checked on him at 3 a.m., he was cold, talking in Czech.

A little while later he was speaking in English to his mother. He said, ‘Mom, I don’t think I am going to make it.’”

Balty’s card remains in my wallet. I haven’t been able remove it. I now live with mindful regrets that I’ll never be able to write his name on another call list. Oh, he was proud of CART providers and captioners, our skills, how we help people. Balty was our biggest fan.

I want you to know this about Balty. He was special to so many people for so long.

And I believe that Balty Janacek is greeting his family, friends, and strangers with a peace sign, kind words, laughter, and beautiful song.

——-  Monette, named the Court Reporting Whisperer by students, may be reached:  Monette.purplebooks@CRRbooks.com

Purple Books – Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com   * Advance skills, pass NCRA and State exams the 1st time

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal, CART Captioner, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Since 1990: Multiple Title Author of Books & Purple Books Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART Captioning Profession

An American RealTime/Captioning Services, LLC: www.ARTCS.com        Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a State exam?  More than once?   Purple Books “Done in One” has a 98% successful pass rate on exams with sets as evidenced by thousands of students and professionals who pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test.   Testimonials: www.CRRbooks.com.

Reach Your Goals:  http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29  Where do you want to go? Specific custom-designed guidance will efficiently assist you!

About Monette Benoit:    As a 30+ year court reporter, CART captioner, author of NCRA and State test-prep material, instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and 225-homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands challenges many adults face in our industry.

In 1993, she began to CART caption to a large screen for a Deaf mass, San Antonio, Texas.  Wonderful opportunities then presented from Big D, Little D, Oral Deaf, HOH consumers -each with special moments.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART captioners, students, instructors. She has helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is an informative, motivational, and funny blog for busy professionals and students who seek to create their success and who seek to enjoy this special path.

25 Apr 2020

ASL, Deaf, HOH, Pharisees, CART Captioning, You, One Lost Sheep And What If…

ASL, Deaf, HOH, Pharisees, CART Captioning, You, One Lost Sheep And What If…
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

~~  Originally published in my column “Beyond The Comfort Zone” within NCRA’s Journal of Court Reporting, JCR

Do you have the skills to realtime for a deaf or hard-of-hearing person? You won’t know if you don’t try. What if you could find a comfortable environment to become realtime proficient?

What if you could nurture your realtime skills, build your confidence and attract new clients outside legal arenas.

You can expand your skills by growing into the technology.

You can realtime for people that appreciate you and your talents.

The hardest part will be not taking yourself too seriously.

As a CART, communication access realtime technology, Captioner writing to large screens, I’ve realtimed unique events, assisting people who wouldn’t have participated if I wasn’t there: McGruff the Crime Dog who signs to children, religious gatherings, baptisms, funerals, voter forums, cochlear implant meetings for tots and children, clairvoyants, theatrical plays, large conventions, banquets, and much more.

I realtimed a Deaf mime acting skits of Mr. Ed meets Batman.

The audience joked that they always knew that horse wasn’t speaking because they knew how to read lips.

The humor in this community just floors me. I’ve been the victim of more practical jokes than I care to admit, but I’m grateful for inclusion in their world.

Recently, I wrote a child singing “Old McDonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O” in the middle of a technical presentation.

And yes, I’ve asked:  The Deaf Society I work with prefers to be known as the Deaf World; not people who are deaf. When in doubt, ask.

They don’t want us to define their world. They’ll be honored that you cared enough to ask how they describe themselves.

Where do you start?

What if you wanted to begin, and someone said you had to become a certified court reporter, RMR and CRR, and have zero percent untrans?

Where do you start to practice? That answer differs for each person, group, even and upon your skills.

Evaluate where you are.

If you edit much of your work and haven’t purchased a laptop, you’re in for a bigger learning curve. But this is where the goal is created. Seek a group, arena or person.

Ask if you can practice to expand your vocabulary. Knowledge of their culture and (to me) a sense of confidence develops to write on a screen as a room watches — or laughs. Yet you have to keep writing.

The earth will not swallow you, no matter how much you wish for it.

Study the group. Go slowly, but go forward. Where do people meet that might want this service? Call LHAA (formerly SHHH), AGB, ALDA, United Way, the American Association of Retired Persons and sign interpreters. Why do they need you to provide this service?

I keep explanations simple. Our wires, equipment, plugs and technology are foreign to people.

Prepare answers to questions that you think you’ll be asked. The rest will flow from your heart.

I prepare fliers in several colors. Each is targeted to the event or educational level of the group: elementary/high school, adults, educators, hard-of-hearing, oral deaf, etc. When someone asks for information (usually as I’m writing in realtime on my steno machine), I point to fliers. When a person calls, I ask for the color of their handout. This saves me time.

Learn about their world.

Reporters ask me: How do I write with a sign interpreter? Interpreters sign when people voice (speak). I call it “thigh-by-thigh” reporting. Interpreters, thigh by thigh, whisper words, interpreting signed discussions, so I can write on a screen.

Find one place – a church, class, organization open to the public – attend regularly. Call ahead and explain what you’d like to do. Ask if you can take your equipment, sit in the back. Tell the group you need their help.

Once I offer my “deer in the headlights” look, people share information, and speak so I can write their words into my dictionary. This is empowering to people you want to assist.

Every person has thanked me for allowing them to help me. They tell me it makes them feel good to contribute.

And I’m told the misconceptions I need to avoid. They tease, laugh and enjoy my struggles. Don’t be offended.

Expand your vocabulary. Write the news. Rent Robin Williams videos. Create a dictionary with terms other than legal terms and preponderance of the evidence.

Ask to be included. A group will become protective of you. Teach them to be protective of your equipment.

As your skills and friends expand, you become more confident. Get the details.

How long is the meeting or event? Is the content technical? If someone is reading your screen, should there be two court reporters to ensure an accurate job?

How long will they need the writer to write? When ‘they’ take a lunch break, are you given a lunch break? What speed do I need?

Can a student do this? Always define “this.” Each group and situation will differ. Prepare as best as you can, then get into that saddle and just write.

After they’ve embraced you, your professional dictionary’s expanded, your confidence has grown, you’re realtiming live on a screen/laptop, then think about local meetings, state and national groups for Deaf, deaf, oral deaf, hard of hearing.

Consider your fees. How much do I charge? They can’t fire a pro bono writer who is preparing – in the corner with her shoulders at her ears.

Earn your wings, then consider by the hours, level of difficulty, ASCII, day/evening rates, long-term commitments.

Think ahead. How do I handle multiple speakers when I’m used to stopping people?

You can’t rely on a tape recorder when you CART caption in a public setting.

Learn to fingerspell. I began by writing the alphabet with my left hand and then the right. I did this over and over until I could realtime the alphabet without hesitation.

If you’re unable to interrupt speakers (in a large setting and this is not a legal proceeding) and you are unable to write verbatim, analyze your group.

Are you on a large screen or laptop? On a laptop, I’ll write, “fastest set of lips in the west.”

On the large screen, I avoid editing, but if I have to get the message, I drop false starts and repetitions.

At first it feels illegal to drop a word. I think this is an art – to write, keep it clean and understandable.

One wise reporter said, “When you’re struggling, give ’em the Reader’s Digest version.” I gasped. But if I’m unable to get it all, I know the message is more important than incorrect trans (translations) with dashes.

When I’m struggling with a fast speaker or technical material, I focus on writing prefix, root word, suffix, punctuating, hoping my body language doesn’t reveal how much I may be struggling or how much I want to be perfect.

Reporters I know browbeat themselves for what didn’t translate.

But the audience remembers what enabled them to understand the event. The same personality that drives a person to become a qualified reporter can be hard on the reporter.

Get over your fears.

Many reporters tell me they’re certified – a CRR and RMR, they realtime in court or in depositions and are too afraid to begin to realtime on a large screen.

Prepare, prepare, prepare.

There are so many wonderful resources available now; reach up and out and make the commitment. Understand that fear is a natural emotion when approaching a new path, you can harness your fear, channeling it as you focus, focus, focus.

Stop hanging around with reporters.

Many reporters can be negative about their limitations.

Cultivate people who don’t quote 100 percent translation. Look for positive feedback. Be prepared to work for your goal.

As I write, I’m hugged, rubbed, tapped, thanked. They will open their hearts and kitchens to you. If you want to realtime, the work will be serious; so is my commitment.

Yet I’m determined to enjoy some of this while I’m sweating bullets.

So what if you could find one place? What if you wanted to expand your life and skills? What if there was one lost sheep?

I realtime a mass for the Catholic Deaf Community to a large screen, which may be viewed by all who attend the service in San Antonio, Texas.

There’s a signing priest who voices and signs ASL, American Sign Language (ASL syntax differs). Interpreters also attend, signing.

The one lost sheep?

One Sunday I wrote about leaders and Pharisees. The priest’s ASL voiced-words, as he signed were:

“Jesus doesn’t understand about these people. If He knew really who was the sinner, He would avoid them. Jesus gave them a story. He said, what if you have 100 sheep, but lose one? What do you do?“ Do you ignore that one and take care of 99 or do you leave 99 and go out and search for that lost sheep until you find him?”

“And you find it, pick it up, and put it on your shoulders. Go back, and you announce, ‘Come, rejoice with me! Because my lost sheep, I have found.’

“How many sheep were in that story? The story said 100; 99 stayed home. Maybe that sheep was deaf.”

“He was calling, ‘Come back. Come back.’ God said, ‘Go, look. Find him. Don’t ignore him. Go, look, find him.”

“That one is precious, bring it back.’ Every day, pray, smile, help others. God bless you.”

Parishioners immediately voiced, signed, “Yeah, what if that sheep was deaf? That’s it. Maybe he was deaf.”

And now I ask you: What about that one lost sheep? What if you made a difference to one person?

What if you extended your hands and heart one step, one event, one realtimed word at a time?

What if you are the one lost sheep?

——–About the Author:   Monette, named the Court Reporting Whisperer by students, may be reached:  Monette.purplebooks@CRRbooks.comPurple Books – Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com   * Advance skills, pass NCRA and State exams the 1st time

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal, CART Captioner, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Since 1990: Multiple Title Author of Books & Purple Books Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART Captioning Profession

An American RealTime/Captioning Services, LLC: www.ARTCS.com        Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a State exam?  More than once?   Purple Books “Done in One” has a 98% successful pass rate on exams with sets as evidenced by thousands of students and professionals who pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test.   Testimonials: www.CRRbooks.com.

Reach Your Goals:  http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29  Where do you want to go? Specific custom-designed guidance will efficiently assist you!

About Monette Benoit:    As a 30+ year court reporter, CART captioner, author of NCRA and State test-prep material, instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and 225-homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands challenges many adults face in our industry.

In 1993, she began to CART caption to a large screen for a Deaf mass, San Antonio, Texas.  Wonderful opportunities then presented from Big D, Little D, Oral Deaf, HOH consumers -each with special moments.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART captioners, students, instructors. She has helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is an informative, motivational, and funny blog for busy professionals and students who seek to create their success and who seek to enjoy this special path.

 

25 Feb 2020

Accepting Lessons, Teaching Lessons, Seeking Challenges To Be The Best I Can Be – CART Captioning

 

“Accepting Lessons, Teaching Lessons, And Seeking Challenges To Be The Best I Can Be” – CART Captioning

~~  Originally published in my column “Beyond The Comfort Zone” within NCRA’s Journal of Court Reporting, JCR

By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

 

Court reporting has professionals who truly rise to challenges. In 1995, after CART captioning the national SHHH, Self-Help For Hard of Hearing, (now HLAA, Hearing Loss Association of America) convention with Deanna Baker and CART providers, my path changed. A doctor insisted on a procedure, which I postponed until after SHHH. (Then the doctor said she would close her office to take me by the hand if I did not go. Thus, I prepped.) I was adamant about details since I was scheduled to caption and CART caption an international convention with 28,000 teenagers for multiple days. Wakening in recovery, my world shook.

 

Head down, I phoned the person who scheduled my work. Humbly, I was clear that I needed help. He listened, replying, “Let me spin some plates in the air.”

Seeking assistance, I contacted professionals locally, then around the U.S. When Carol’s name was shared I phoned her home. Confidentially, I shared my situation.

We agreed that since I was a religious realtime court reporter I would caption/CART biblical classes and sermons. Carol would caption/CART performances and skits.

Carol arrived first-class. (All coach seats were booked.) When I could not find her in the airport, I had her paged. With gratitude I introduced myself to the smiling woman with her steno machine and tripod inside a beach bag. Immediately we focused to become a team serving others to accomplish this first-time event.

I desire to share Carol’s world. Carol Hill Williams, RPR, RMR, CRR, CMRS, CRI, CPE, is an inspiration, a true professional. Oh, we have the funniest memories. When I sought needed help, Carol accepted a new challenge.

Together we were unstoppable and delivered needed ‘words’ for deaf, HOH (hard of hearing), and legally blind who watched our open captions.

Carol: I love court reporting. In 1978 my mother told me about her jury service, and the person with the little machine. School was my first challenge. I learned to practice, finishing in two years.

How we made money then I will never know. We had no computers. We had an electric typewriter, electric note-puller, Dictaphone, carbons. After lining up papers, if you made errors, you yanked all papers out, started all over. If you weren’t typing your transcripts, you dictated or hired a scopist. My first computer was $20,000 – edit station only. We worked until 5 or 6 a.m., slept little.

I have a strong faith. God teaches me lessons for areas I am weak, surrounding me with people to help me. Initially, I worked for a wonderful woman, Jeanne Wiley of Cook & Wiley. Jeanne, having been president of Virginia’s association, encouraged reporters to achieve certifications, to get involved in state associations.

We need to become active in state associations. You meet court reporters, exchange ideas, associations grow. I worked as editor, secretary, treasurer, vice president, then Virginia president.

I passed my RPR and RMR. After two NCRA CRR attempts, I learned about beta blockers. With a prescription, gushing water from my palms and forehead subdued, I passed. Later I passed the CMRS and CPE.

I love challenges. I still break into a sweat and pace the floor until I arrive. My confidence has increased. I love being a freelancer: every day is different, every place is different, everybody has a story. Life is different faces with different stories, different speeds. I’ve also learned not to worry what tomorrow may bring. The more focused we are in the present moment, the more we appreciate what today is about.

In 1995 I was flown to San Antonio to work alongside Monette Benoit to provide captioning and CART for an international religious teen convention filling the Alamodome. I learned how to quickly add theological entries for instant translation.

I have always been a freelance writer, so 4 to 5 p.m. is the bewitching hour; your fate is sealed for the next day. You may be called to realtime an accident depo or weeks-on-end realtime trial with translators and expedited delivery.

I’ve had my own firm. It takes a lot to keep eccentric people happy. I also learned my values are not necessarily someone else’s values. Focusing on providing the best service I can is what really matters.

After two years in my business and both parents passing away, I needed a change. I wanted to move to a litigious city, one with beautiful weather, palm trees.

I moved to Miami five years ago – knowing no one. I searched for a firm that shared my values. I have been working for Tom Kresse of Kresse & Associates since. It’s a wonderful feeling to work for someone with a stellar reputation, who acknowledges hard work and goes to bat for the reporters.

Consumed with never having enough work, I balanced work and a healthy lifestyle. Then I visited South Beach wearing a one-piece suit, wraparound skirt, weighing 190 pounds. In an awakening moment, viewing women clad in less than almost nothing, I realized I had come to a fork in the road of my life; I had to change directions. The week after South Beach I found a gym. I laboriously dedicated myself to a rigorous exercise regimen, following a nutritionist’s diet.

After three years, I lost 50 pounds. My trainer’s wife asked if I would like to walk or run a 5 K, 3.1 miles. I decided to challenge myself. After the gun went off, I ran – finding a new love of life.

God puts the right people in my life at the right time. I found a running group I run with several times a week and lost 65 pounds. January 2008 I turned 50; I completed my first marathon, 26.2 miles.

Upon completion, I wanted another challenge. Athletes gather to compete in triathlons. My initial reaction was no way could I accomplish this feat, nor risk getting injured. After contemplation, I decided to try it.

I am blessed to have a four-time Olympic inline skater coach, KC Boutiette. He taught me how to swim and bike, run efficiently and how to push yourself out of my comfort zone.

This year I challenged myself. I completed two marathons, Miami and Chicago, a 120-mile running relay, Hood to Coast in Oregon, three sprint triathlons: .47-mile swim, 12.4 bike and 3.1 run; and an international triathlon: .6-mile swim, 26 bike, and 6.2 run. Next year I am slated to do two marathons, sprint triathlons, two half Ironmans, 1.2-mile swim, 56 bike and 13.2 run. And now I am a leader to new runners prepping each for their first marathon.

What have I learned through this madness?

Any goal is obtainable with the right training, dedication. My compulsiveness for never having enough work has never changed; I learned a balance is what really brings happiness.

I never would have made it without my Christian faith and letting those around me give me encouragement. I believe we have to share what we have been so graciously given. Even though what you may be facing seems like a giant obstacle, this too shall pass, and you will have grown even stronger because of it.

Instead of focusing on how I possibly can do what seems impossible, I focus on what I am doing now to become the best I can.

Monette: Often we are challenged, learning lessons.

Then we are blessed to meet new professionals, new life-friends. I continue to thank you, Carol, for ‘Stepping Into The Light’ in 1995 accepting new lessons, seeking challenges to be the best you (we) can be. Carol may be reached: chwmiami@bellsouth.net

Monette, named the Court Reporting Whisperer by students, may be reached:  Monette.purplebooks@CRRbooks.com

Purple Books – Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com   * Advance skills, pass NCRA and State exams the 1st time

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal, CART Captioner, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Since 1990: Multiple Title Author of Books & Purple Books Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART Captioning Profession

An American RealTime/Captioning Services, LLC: www.ARTCS.com        Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a State exam?  More than once?   Purple Books “Done in One” has a 98% successful pass rate on exams with sets as evidenced by thousands of students and professionals who pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test.   Testimonials: www.CRRbooks.com.

Reach Your Goals:  http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29  Where do you want to go? Specific custom-designed guidance will efficiently assist you!

About Monette Benoit:    As a 30+ year court reporter, CART captioner, author of NCRA and State test-prep material, instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and 225-homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands challenges many adults face in our industry.

In 1993, she began to CART caption to a large screen for a Deaf mass, San Antonio, Texas.  Wonderful opportunities then presented from Big D, Little D, Oral Deaf, HOH consumers -each with special moments.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART captioners, students, instructors. She has helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is an informative, motivational, and funny blog for busy professionals and students who seek to create their success and who seek to enjoy this special path.

 

 

19 Feb 2020

Our Words Are Our O.R., Part III of III

Our Words Are Our O.R., Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part III:

In response to my words and to my father’s words about my “listening”, Ms. D.O.N. then said, “I still don’t like the look on her face,” and left the room.

I thought about Frazier Crane’s, “I’m listening, Seattle…” and watched her backside exit the doorway as each person counted down, in unison.

Together, the professionals raised all equipment and my father.

They called to me, and I followed their brisk steps.

In realtime, my eyebrows are permanently raised; my breath controlled as I seek to avoid upsetting my father (as I continue to do with Mom’s dire health issues).

Later, in ER, as I hunted for water and pudding (any food), Dad weakly asked, “What are you thinking about?”

I shrugged, “Maybe an article.”

He giggled, “I thought so. You have my permission. I need to rest now.” His head immediately slumped to his chest.

When I returned with crackers and peanut butter on two plastic spoons, Dad said, “This is not your playground.” Then he smiled.

I put a cracker and some peanut butter into my mouth and chewing I said, “Sure it is. I can’t make lemonade here, now can I? I’m doing the best I can right now. And I still can listen while chewing this stale food. This ‘is’ awful.” Again, he smiled.

The ER doctor entered the room, read the lab results, and confirmed “we are in dangerous territory right now.”

Within 48 hours, we were back in O.R. for the second attempt to surgically place the feeding tube.

(Dad was too weak for the first attempt. The anesthesiologist pulled him from the O.R. table after he had been cleared by all the other doctors.)

After hours of waiting, I stood in another small area.

A blanket was draped over my shoulders. I was proofing work from a multi-event CART, Communication Access Realtime Translation, job.

Standing, I was rubbing my back on the wall to warm my body as I held work in my hands, head down, proofing.

Another surgeon came in the room and began to speak as he opened the door.

I said, “Here, let me put this down.”

Yet again, I saw that look and yet again heard a sigh.

He exhaled, sat down, and (I swear) said, “Okay, I’ll wait for you then.”

I pursed my lips, did not engage, and asked, “How is my father?”

The surgeon sat there and (I swear) asked if I was ready to listen to him.

I thought, “Oh, for the love of God. Just one calm moment. Just one helpful person, please.”

Instead, I smiled at the dude, kept the blanket around my shoulders, sat in a chair, and listened to his words and (dire) medical terms.

I maintained the court reporter posture that we all know – expressionless.

Yes, I realtimed his conversation in my head, with punctuation, to avoid having a response other than as a court reporter.

I focused the way I used to when a full jury was listening to a witness or the judge.

We do not have reactions in court or during litigation.

My focus was to display the expressionless posture and features from the moment he began to rattle on — oh, at approximately 260 words per minute.

(Yes, we do that, too.

We think about the speed of the words, known as ‘words per minute’, to us, as in a speed test.)

When he finished, I walked to my car, placed my forehead on my blistering hot steering wheel – inside my hot car that felt oh so good.

I kept my sweater on under the surgical blanket as I warmed my body in my car. I also focused on focusing.

I focused on the bigger picture at that moment.

The bigger picture was not me crying, banging the steering wheel, or venting my frustrations and grief for what I have been witnessing. I focused on focus.

The focus was simple as I sat remembering to breathe in, then breathe out. Then repeat.

Why am I writing this?

Nurses and staff have again (it happened with Mom in ICU multiple times, too) made additional comments, which I have not included here.

I am deliberately focused on staying in the moment.

I have not kicked any walls or thrown anything. I have not whined.

I have not sniffled.

I have listened.

I am not willing to discuss what others (perhaps the word is “outsiders”) think about our court reporting work and our working with my work while a parent -or two- is in ER, ICU, O.R., or within any hospital setting.

Now when individuals meet me, as the RN today, she approached saying, “Yes, I’ve heard about you…”

Now a generation of family members under me narrow their eyes, pursing their lips as they look to me and to the person who voiced those words. Listening, they frown more now.

When you read this essay, it may be 103 degrees. Time will tell where I think my family is headed.

I believe that I will still be listening and proofing my articles.

I will still proof my CART work and ensuring (technical events) my clients receive customized results for their unique requests.

I will continue to proof work as I update the “NCRA RPR, CSR, CBC, CCP Written Knowledge Test” textbook, workbook, and companion study guide.

This is my passion. This is my work.

This is why we are keepers of the records, yes?

My opinion is we become disciplined with our listening skills – as it should be.

I hope no one travels my path for the past four years.

I wish you all great health and wonderful adventures.

I know we will continue to be ‘the’ listeners in each group.

This is what I have learned. Words are our O.R.

Part I of III is posted May 2, 2014, Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted May 14, 2014, Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 29, 2014, Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

29 May 2014

Spurt-Ability, Part III of III

Spurt-Ability, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I began: While coaching a novice court reporter, the professional said, “I don’t like to take tests. That’s why I went to court reporting school.”

I said softly, “Now that’s a thing of beauty.” He sincerely replied, “It’s true.” I truly replied, “You will read about this. Trust me.”

How does that happen?

Part II began: When I taught, I shared this spurt-focus with students. Many, many students took to it like a hummingbird to a red feeder. They liked it (my tutoring and coaching students like it, too). Really.

When I began to realtime and CART to a large screen, I had to focus on the spurts, the spurt-ability…

Part III: A spurt is a small marathon with yourself.

A spurt is similar to a sprinter on the track.

A spurt is similar to a pole vaulter. (more…)

28 Feb 2014

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part III of III

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I began: Part I began: One student, in the 225 wpm (words per minute) exit room in a court reporting program, “is scared to death of passing the state certification test and national certification. Then people will see that I can’t write accurately! I changed almost everything in my theory to brief forms, one strokes, to pass my tests. I was told to do this to advance in my speed classes. Everyone is doing this! I read through all my errors on each test! … Help me.” …

Part II began: Softly, I replied, “Perhaps you do not want to swan dive into the mind games.” …

We each can evolve to a better “spot” when we choose opportunities or when we are given ultimatums, yes?

Perhaps there has never been a better time to expand your skills. Spot on, yes?

Or perhaps you believe there has to be a “secret sauce” to reaching your goal, your desired result.

Where do you want to be in three months? Three weeks? Tomorrow at 3:00?

Part III of III:

Many court reporters are nearing retirement.

This will open new markets for individuals who are intent on shifting with expanding, new opportunities. Big fact.

In short, what might conflict with your goals to meet new opportunities, and what energy might expand your current strengths? This is one of many focus topics within my tutoring and empowerment coaching.

As you discover the specifics to the above-listed details in your private and professional world you will then be able to make choices to propel you to organize your fears.

Perhaps we are struggling too hard. Perhaps we want to know more about our fears.

I believe that organizing fears is a powerful step to moving toward your distinctive goals – whether it is to read your accurate notes in school to transcribe a test, whether it is to train yourself for a better position with your work, or whether a goal is to follow your heart’s desire with a new path that you create.

Fear can be a motivator.

Setbacks can be a motivator, too.

We know this “motivator” with 95 percent accuracy each day that we are required to earn while in school. We know this with the required accuracy on each job. Fact.

Once we have identified the fear(s) then we can focus on what is beckoning with all our resources and with our multi-faceted talents.

For the next two weeks I would like to suggest that you make a list of your goals, a list containing your fears, and a list of what is between the goal(s) and the fear(s).

As you explore your list for two weeks (okay, one week if you desire), I promise you that you will see your path and your challenges from a different lens.

I believe that when you understand what is truly inspiring you, and what is limiting you, you are then the master of your possibilities. Spot on focus.

We know that history has been exacted because we, court reporters, were motivated – with exacting discipline.

We are inspired and encouraged to be our best. Again, this is our normal.

Always we simply reinforce, and always we expand our skills. Always we explore.

Always we simply realign, and always we identify our goals.

Always we seek to identify our resistance to our current goals.

And perhaps we want to focus upon owning our fears.

I wish you wonderful growth, vast professional success, and an awesome, peaceful holiday.

Spot on, and yes, this is our normal. Fact.

Part I of III is posted November 14, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted December 5, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted December 20, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

20 Dec 2013

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects, Part II of III

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects, Part II of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
July 28, 2013

Part I began: The nurse, RN, was speaking to me about my mother’s recent ICU discharge when overhead speakers broadcast a doctor’s page. He cupped one hand over the back of each ear. I watched, sans comment.

I am witnessing many medical professionals with hearing loss…

He said softly, “Don’t tell anyone. I have hearing loss.”

I nodded, “I see that you have coping skills to assist you.”

“You noticed?” he replied.

Me, “Yes, sir. Due to my work.”

Mom tells everyone, every shift, “My daughter is a court reporter, a teacher, and she’s an author …”

I was prepared to not pursue this topic. However, I find 99 percent of people who have hearing loss do want to detail their world with me. I listen, humbled, learning from each.

He said, “Most people don’t notice. My wife’s worse! She’s the one I worry about. I’ll tell you tomorrow, okay?” I nodded.

We returned to our task – “required gowning with gloves and mask in the hall before entering.”

He asked how I was familiar with hearing loss. I shared “court reporter, CART provider, captioner, consultant.”

This nurse said, “My wife and children have serious issues. I just have hearing loss. But I know what I want before I lose my hearing.”

“My wife has glaucoma. When she was a teen she took glaucoma medicine to decrease her eye pressure. The medicine also decreases inner ear pressure and damages nerves. Her hearing loss now is from medicine long ago. What’s worse than that?”

“Each generation then has hearing loss from the parent’s medicine.”

Part II of III

My eyes were as big as saucers as I listened to this man talk about the glaucoma medicine and generational effects.

He summed it up, “Tomorrow I’ll tell you what I want. I probably won’t get it. Yet I have to have hopes. Right?”

The next day, this nurse sprang from his chair as I entered to visit Mom isolated with MRSA, pseudomonosis, and additional ICU sterile lung bacteria.

“I’ve been waiting for you. I told my wife about you and court reporters. We know all about your work. We thank you and your profession for helping us. Once I tell you what I really want, could you tell me how to help my 12-year old?” I nodded.

I whipped out my iPad, asked permission to write notes.

He said, “Sure! Let’s go look at the latest and greatest. It’s not well known, but it could be once the price comes down. And with glaucoma patients and their children’s children – and their children – they’re all going to need your help.”

We hunkered together and looked up “tympanoplasty.” The prostheses resembles a small earring. Hearing must be present.

He emphasized, “This is different than cochlear implants. It’s titanium. Implants require relearning sounds and have differing results. This titanium tympanoplasty device is shaped to fit into each ear. It originated in Germany.”

The nurse shared that his wife and children are not prostheses candidates due to their “glaucoma medicine-induced hearing loss” (each child has never had glaucoma, nor do they have the gene).

He shared, “Medical costs are $30,000; insurance doesn’t cover it – yet. But I could hear again with this. I’ve done my homework. Now I just have to find a doctor who will do the surgery and not want thirty grand,” he said tenderly.

Later that day, he found me in the hallway – staring at the floor – wearing the isolation gown – holding the required gloves, sans mask.

Now he held a notepad; he asked how he could help his family.

“One son already has problems. He’s been bullied. I taught him karate for discipline and confidence. His speech is now thick-tongued as pressure in his ears create hearing loss from his mother’s glaucoma medicine before he was born.”

Part I is posted July 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com
Part II is posted July 28, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com
Part III is posted August 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

28 Jul 2013

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects, Part I of III

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
July 11, 2013

Part I of III

The nurse, RN, was speaking to me about my mother’s recent ICU discharge when overhead speakers broadcast a doctor’s page. He cupped one hand over the back of each ear. I watched, sans comment.

I am witnessing many medical professionals with hearing loss.

Yet these moments are far more frequent than years ago – especially during the past two years deep in the medical trenches as I viewed my father’s care prior to his death.

Perhaps it is my antenna as I view Mom’s challenges to “avoid death’s door” (a termed given to Mom) wherein I see many people now working with hearing loss.

He said softly, “Don’t tell anyone. I have hearing loss.”

I nodded, “I see that you have coping skills to assist you.”

“You noticed?” he replied.

Me, “Yes, sir. Due to my work.”

Mom tells everyone, every shift, “My daughter is a court reporter, a teacher, and she’s an author …”

I simply bow my head. On many occasions I have been so happy Mom is alive that I avoid the “daughter sigh.”

I was prepared to not pursue this topic. However, I find 99 percent of people who have hearing loss do want to detail their world with me. I listen, humbled, learning from each.

He said, “Most people don’t notice. My wife’s worse! She’s the one I worry about. I’ll tell you tomorrow, okay?” I nodded.

We returned to our task – “required gowning with gloves and mask in the hall before entering.”

The next day the nurse met me. “I’ve been waiting for you.”

He asked how I was familiar with hearing loss. I shared “court reporter, CART provider, captioner, consultant.”

This nurse said, “My wife and children have serious issues. I just have hearing loss. But I know what I want before I lose my hearing.”

“My wife has glaucoma. When she was a teen she took glaucoma medicine to decrease her eye pressure. The medicine also decreases inner ear pressure and damages nerves. Her hearing loss now is from medicine long ago. What’s worse than that?”

“Each generation then has hearing loss from the parent’s medicine.”

“Our children have decreased hearing and so will their children. One son is 12. He has huge decreased hearing. I worry about our children.”

He paused before continuing.

“Since their hearing loss is more severe, their treatments come first. I’ve studied genetics about this. The fear of losing eyesight and hearing is devastating to my wife and to our children. That’s why we’re not going to have any more children. And my work …” his voice trailed off.

He beamed, “But I know exactly what I want. It’s state-of-the-art.”

Part I is posted July 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com
Part II is posted July 28, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com
Part III is posted August 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

11 Jul 2013

Ouch. That Hurt My Ears! Part III of III

Ouch. That Hurt My Ears! Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
June 2013

Part I began: Another errand. Another task to be completed.

My mother has been hospitalized for a while now. We have serious issues – to include ICU and MRSA isolation (multiple hospital bacteria, each gifted to Mom – again).

Yesterday Mom’s twin brother died.

When he was a Marine (enlisting ‘underage’ without telling his mother) Mom’s twin brother served on the front lines in Iwo Jima, Okinawa, Gudalcanal, and numerous other battles.

When her twin brother was shot, Mom woke, crying at 4:30 a.m. …

… Each time the double doors opened the cashier gasped.

She lowered her head, placing one hand over each ear as she winced. Stunned, I watched.

Then the woman said, “It is so windy outside! Every time the doors open it hurts my ears. Ouch!” …

Part II began:

Faith, “Mom resisted for so long… Mom didn’t think it would work. This is the funny part. Just as the lady turned on the sound machine to test her hearing the air conditioning unit went off. That pressure hurt Mom’s ears. She said, ‘Ouch! That hurts!’ Then Mom was angry at the noise. My step-dad and I laughed. Then Mom was angry with us for laughing. So we laughed harder until she ‘finally’ understood that she was angry at our laughing and ‘that’ was sound. Her first sound in 30 years. Then she laughed.”

I smiled. Faith continued, “Now my son has a hearing loss, too. He has the gene, I guess. He just finished a tour in Afghanistan. He missed the hearing test! And he wanted to serve so bad! So he wrote his quartermaster a letter telling him how much it would mean to serve. And his letter worked! They took him! He served, though failing the hearing test was not shared with others … He’s just come home. That’s why I agreed to get the implant. I may have grandchildren soon. I want to hear everything! Everything!”

Part III:

I asked, “Your mother has nine siblings with hearing loss? You and your son have a hearing loss?”

She laughed, “Yes! And it’s been perfectly normal for us. Mom didn’t want to hear all of us when we were kids – she used to tease us. It’s all been perfectly normal. Now she can hear perfect! Soon I will, too. And I have tinnitus and that hurts, too. Ouch, the doors just opened again.”

The woman behind me wore dark eyeglasses, a large hat.

She shoved a bag onto the counter, and chin down said, “This doesn’t work. Here!”

Watching the rude woman I paused before taking two steps away from the counter. Faith was beaming with a huge smile. She winked at me, took the bag and asked the woman, “How may I help you?” The frowning woman never looked Faith in the eye. She snarked and barked at Faith.

Yet Faith smiled at me for the longest time. When the doors next opened, Faith winced. She did not cover her ears.

Dramatically, she pointed to one ear, slowly mouthing “cochlear implant.” Then she laughed.

I held my bag of sympathy cards for my mother’s twin brother’s family, headed to the door and tried to exit opening one door just a little (to avoid pressure on Faith’s ears).

The wind gusts grabbed the door from my hand and flew wide open.

Frozen, I looked back at Faith. Her beaming smile remained and Faith said, loudly, “Thank you. Thank you for telling me about the successes! Two weeks! Can’t wait!”

Oh, this lady touched my heart.

Her hope and enthusiasm will serve her well as she welcomes ‘sound’ back into her world.

Had it not been for the need for sympathy cards for my mom (which Mom cannot select due to her hospitalization), traveling a new road on an abnormally windy day – I would have missed this opportunity to meet Faith. And I am grateful she shared.

Faith and her son – each choosing to receive cochlear implants – will have opportunities and choices that many people with hearing loss previously were not afforded.

And the Deaf community’s reaction?

Oh, that’s a whole nuther kettle of fish.

Cochlear implants are not for everyone; this I know from CARTing and captioning many seminars where individuals shared from podiums (and privately to me).

Yet, for Faith, per Faith, this is going to change everything for Faith.

And isn’t that grand? She has choices.
“And three generations with implants,” Faith repeatedly emphasized.

As I stood, bag in hand with the sympathy cards, Faith shared that when her first mother heard the air conditioning noise voicing her first ‘sound’ sentence, “Ouch, that hurts” – her mother’s second sentence was “Isn’t Jesus great?”

Faith shared “Isn’t Jesus great?” is now their family motto when it comes to loss of hearing and to increasing their hearing.

One of my personally challenging days turned into a sweet, memorable day gifted by an enthusiastic woman “waiting to hear again.” And “isn’t that great?” I now ask you?

Part I of III is posted June 3, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings
Part II of III is posted June 14, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings
Part III of III is posted June 25, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

27 Jun 2013

Ouch. That Hurt My Ears! Part I of III

Ouch. That Hurt My Ears! Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
June 2013

Another errand. Another task to be completed.

My mother has been hospitalized for a while now.

We have serious issues – to include ICU and MRSA isolation (multiple hospital bacteria, each gifted to Mom – again).

Yesterday Mom’s twin brother died.

When he was a Marine (enlisting ‘underage’ without telling his mother) Mom’s twin brother served on the front lines in Iwo Jima, Okinawa, Gudalcanal, and numerous other battles.

When her twin brother was shot, Mom woke, crying at 4:30 a.m.

Mom told her mother, “He’s been shot!” pointing to specific areas on her body.

Mom’s mother (court stenographer and a piano prodigy) told my mom that it was a bad dream, hugged her, and gently told Mom, then a teen, to go back to sleep.

The next morning, Corpus Christi’s Western Union delivered the news.

Yes, Mom’s twin brother was shot and injured exactly where Mom had described to her mother at 4:30 a.m. with her twin brother stationed in an undisclosed location with the Marines in the Pacific.

With her twin’s death yesterday, and my concerns about my mom and her failing health, I left her hospital room to purchase sympathy cards.

Today we have a wind advisory day with 40-50 mile per hour winds. I raced in, selected several cards, sprinted to one of many cashiers.

I placed the sympathy cards on the counter.

Each time the double doors opened the cashier gasped.

She lowered her head, placing one hand over each ear as she winced. Stunned, I watched.

Then the woman said, “It is so windy outside! Every time the doors open it hurts my ears. Ouch!”

Softly I said, “Maybe chewing gum might help – like pressure in a plane?” (I did not know what to say – was running late. I needed to head off.)

The woman smiled, “No, it’s the pressure inside my hearing aid in each ear. But in two weeks I get my cochlear implant! Then I won’t have this problem. And that will be wonderful. Then my ears won’t hurt from any pressure.”

I smiled.

She did not know that I have worked within the Deaf and HOH, hard of hearing, communities since 1993 providing CART, Communication Access Real Time, and captioning to large and small screens for many, many public and private events.

She did not know that I am very familiar with cochlear implant technology, individuals, and children.

Faith said, “I have needed a cochlear implant for so long. I have not wanted one. My mother got one. She loves hers! She raised us children without being able to hear most of our life. But now she can hear.”

I remained silent.

Faith said, “Most people don’t know what they are. But it will help me with the pressure, and I won’t have to worry about winds and this excruciating pain!”

Softly I said, “I am familiar with cochlear implants.”

She beamed.

“You are? Well, my mother is one of 13 children. Nine have cochlear implants. Now my generation is losing our hearing. When Mom got her implant it was so funny!”

I turned to see if anyone was standing behind me in the busy store. Nope. I was “all ears” as I turned back to listen to this cheerful lady.

Part I of III is posted June 3, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings
Part II of III is posted June 14, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings
Part III of III is posted June 25, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

03 Jun 2013

How’d That Happen? And Real-Time Captioners, Part III of III

How’d That Happen? And Real-Time Captioners, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
April 2013

Part I began: As we listen, as we scan and troll, now and then a moment may stop us in our tracks. Each track depends on where we are at that moment. Each track when viewed over one’s shoulder, as hindsight, may appear to be very different.

And this is why I am still tilting my head asking “How’d that happen?”

Recently a mail list shared by court reporters, captioners, CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) providers, instructors, and students, someone posted a link “Appendix A, Hourly Pay for Real-Time Captioners.” Levels were identified with hourly rates. Each level states, “a minimum captioning speed of … and recommendation by the Director.” Appendix A ends: …

Part II began: Yet I know in 1993 when I began to CART in San Antonio, Texas, the sign interpreters negotiated (they used that word) for me “since you arrive with all your equipment and work solo.”

Back then there was no word for CART.

Part III: We became a team, all working together. Why? To provide the best service we could together is my humble reply. And we have had a lot of fun in “our” trench together, and the interpreters continue to be my friends and my advocates.

They tease me that that the only equipment they purchase is the one-color outfit. (Interpreters usually wear one color, so individuals needing their skills watch hand motions and facial expressions without distractions of colors and designs.)

And they teased me, “You? George Carlin has a routine about packing, then packing with less to then pack with less. Have you heard Carlin’s routine?” Their teasing was not mean spirited. Oh, I listened.

I listened to their teasing, their wisdom, their teaching how I should structure my rates. They taught me when there was no one to ask.

Remote interpreting has changed their world, even as it has changed for CART providers.

Now we are where are. We knew then that the MTV generation would change the world. We knew then that cochlear implants would change their world. We knew then that our technology “captioning without video” (as many referenced CART after my work) would change the world.

Now we have the ability to look over our shoulders and to reflect from whence we have come, where we are now, and where we seek to direct our paths.

Yet I am still pondering, how is it that a college posted qualifications and rates for “Real-Time Captioners” that might stun many who completed court reporting school and purchased equipment to provide this CART service?

I also wonder too, if hourly rates will decrease the way broadcast captioning rates did years ago?

Once the requested lower fee was met, there was a free-fall as contracts were pulled. Rates fell astoundingly until a new low was met. (Rates have since fallen.)

Sign interpreters who learned about the decrease(s) – when our equipment costs to provide services was well documented as not for the faint of heart – were amazed. They murmured to me, “And with your expenses …”

Frequently, I softly asked my friends, “How much – you two now?”

I learn(ed) two interpreters often working 20 minutes each reflects higher than my amount.

Then I am softly reminded, “And our clock starts when we leave home – with mileage. Have you ever thought about sign interpreting? It pays better.”

September 2012, I wrote in my JCR (Journal of Court Reporting) column “Beyond The Comfort Zone,” and blog “Monette’s Musings,” the article “You All Start In CART Now, Right?” That was almost six months before reading about the college’s requirements. Will we ask ”Disabled Students Programs and Services” we are being justly compensated for the skill set and for the equipment we provide, alone, hour after hour?

Working to preserve the record – wordsmiths that we are – we rise to each request. Thus, looking ahead and not over my shoulder working yet another late evening, I have to ask, “How’d that happen?”

Part I of III is posted April 7, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted April 11, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted April 27, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
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Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

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Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

27 Apr 2013