NCRA RPR Test Prep WKT skills RMR RDR CSR CCR

Press Release: Purple Books Revised, Updated, 7th Ed., Textbook, NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Available from Purple Books, CRRbooks.com, November 2017: new 7th edition textbook with the only updated NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, and State WKT, written knowledge test, information for students and court reporters.

350 pages, CRRbooks.com by Monette Benoit: Complete Written Knowledge Test Textbook, Seventh Edition, Revised and Updated for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs with the NCRA CRC Primer

Tests change. Exam questions and multiple choices are not repeated. Exam fees are pricey.

Updated, expanded text chapters: Test-Taking Tips, Focus; Legal, Latin Terminology; Court Reporting Rules; English, Grammar, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions; Medical Information; Computer Terminology, Technology, CRC Prep, Ethics, Windows, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions; Review

98% successful ‘Done In One’ pass rate continues on NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSR WKT material when Purple Books study sets are a primary source. Plus, you join thousands of students and court reporters who earned their RPR, CSR, and the elite RDR certification with Purple Books test-prep.

Study the only textbook and textbook package for the RPR, CSRs, and NCRA’s RDR written exam.
With thorough prep, you will pass the first time by learning how to answer, how to take the test.

Purple Books are written by a court reporter, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, paralegal, with an educator who earned a B.S. in English and a M. Ed.

Since 1990, time-tested, proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study —
students and court reporters continue to write “best investment — ever.”

* Plus, 7th edition textbook includes the CRC, Certified Realtime Captioner, Primer because many reporters now provide CART captioning, and certifications are now requested by companies, consumers for their files.

RPR, RDR, and state CSR candidates focus on the popular “Complete Test Prep Set” that includes: the Textbook, Workbook (*2,002 practice questions), Companion Guide (cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice questions), and RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Complete Set includes 4 test-prep books: http://crrbooks.com/product/written-exams
In this set, the Realtime Vocabulary Workbook is $ 8.00 (regularly: $ 36)

Pedagogically sound, each book reviews and covers material with facts, tips, and information.

Purple Books maximize your time, your expenses, and your results!

Students and professionals also seek tutoring and career counseling with Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer. No two people are alike. Customized sessions are created. Start today.
Plan and prepare now. Monette is committed to helping you. Email: Monette@CRRbooks.com

‘Done In One’ Testimonials, Pricing online www.CRRbooks.com

22 Nov 2017

Press Release NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Exams

Press Release NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Exams

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

98% successful pass rate by students and court reporters on NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and on State CSR written exams.

Court Reporter Reference Books has released the revised and updated Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Written Test Prep Textbook, Sixth Edition. This textbook is available now on www.CRRbooks.com.

This is the ­most complete written test prep textbook available to students, teachers, and to novice and veteran court reporters.

The textbook by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner, has updated and expanded chapters:

Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics.

Detailed chapters include: Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

The popular “Test Prep Set” includes a 4-volume set:
1. Textbook, 6th Edition, Revised, Updated for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSR;
2. Workbook, (with approximately 2,002 practice test questions and answer key);
3. Companion Study Guide (cross-references every word in the workbook to learn ‘how’ to take a test and specifically ‘how’ to answer a question with multiple choice a-b-c-d);
4. RealTime Vocabulary Workbook (expands vocabulary growth with word recognition and comprehension to help students and reporters know how to identify and how to build words)

*** NCRA’s RDR test candidates successfully use the only textbook and only realtime vocabulary workbook to earn the most elite RDR, Registered, Diplomate Reporter, certification within the court reporting profession.

“Get ‘Er Done In Just One” – Study the “purple books” that are pedagogically sound and cover a wealth of material with facts and information. Testimonials from students, instructors, and court reporters are online for you to review.

All material is time-tested, proven for both the classroom and independent study.

CRRbooks.com lists complete details.

13 Apr 2015

Our Words Are Our O.R., Part III of III

Our Words Are Our O.R., Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part III:

In response to my words and to my father’s words about my “listening”, Ms. D.O.N. then said, “I still don’t like the look on her face,” and left the room.

I thought about Frazier Crane’s, “I’m listening, Seattle…” and watched her backside exit the doorway as each person counted down, in unison.

Together, the professionals raised all equipment and my father.

They called to me, and I followed their brisk steps.

In realtime, my eyebrows are permanently raised; my breath controlled as I seek to avoid upsetting my father (as I continue to do with Mom’s dire health issues).

Later, in ER, as I hunted for water and pudding (any food), Dad weakly asked, “What are you thinking about?”

I shrugged, “Maybe an article.”

He giggled, “I thought so. You have my permission. I need to rest now.” His head immediately slumped to his chest.

When I returned with crackers and peanut butter on two plastic spoons, Dad said, “This is not your playground.” Then he smiled.

I put a cracker and some peanut butter into my mouth and chewing I said, “Sure it is. I can’t make lemonade here, now can I? I’m doing the best I can right now. And I still can listen while chewing this stale food. This ‘is’ awful.” Again, he smiled.

The ER doctor entered the room, read the lab results, and confirmed “we are in dangerous territory right now.”

Within 48 hours, we were back in O.R. for the second attempt to surgically place the feeding tube.

(Dad was too weak for the first attempt. The anesthesiologist pulled him from the O.R. table after he had been cleared by all the other doctors.)

After hours of waiting, I stood in another small area.

A blanket was draped over my shoulders. I was proofing work from a multi-event CART, Communication Access Realtime Translation, job.

Standing, I was rubbing my back on the wall to warm my body as I held work in my hands, head down, proofing.

Another surgeon came in the room and began to speak as he opened the door.

I said, “Here, let me put this down.”

Yet again, I saw that look and yet again heard a sigh.

He exhaled, sat down, and (I swear) said, “Okay, I’ll wait for you then.”

I pursed my lips, did not engage, and asked, “How is my father?”

The surgeon sat there and (I swear) asked if I was ready to listen to him.

I thought, “Oh, for the love of God. Just one calm moment. Just one helpful person, please.”

Instead, I smiled at the dude, kept the blanket around my shoulders, sat in a chair, and listened to his words and (dire) medical terms.

I maintained the court reporter posture that we all know – expressionless.

Yes, I realtimed his conversation in my head, with punctuation, to avoid having a response other than as a court reporter.

I focused the way I used to when a full jury was listening to a witness or the judge.

We do not have reactions in court or during litigation.

My focus was to display the expressionless posture and features from the moment he began to rattle on — oh, at approximately 260 words per minute.

(Yes, we do that, too.

We think about the speed of the words, known as ‘words per minute’, to us, as in a speed test.)

When he finished, I walked to my car, placed my forehead on my blistering hot steering wheel – inside my hot car that felt oh so good.

I kept my sweater on under the surgical blanket as I warmed my body in my car. I also focused on focusing.

I focused on the bigger picture at that moment.

The bigger picture was not me crying, banging the steering wheel, or venting my frustrations and grief for what I have been witnessing. I focused on focus.

The focus was simple as I sat remembering to breathe in, then breathe out. Then repeat.

Why am I writing this?

Nurses and staff have again (it happened with Mom in ICU multiple times, too) made additional comments, which I have not included here.

I am deliberately focused on staying in the moment.

I have not kicked any walls or thrown anything. I have not whined.

I have not sniffled.

I have listened.

I am not willing to discuss what others (perhaps the word is “outsiders”) think about our court reporting work and our working with my work while a parent -or two- is in ER, ICU, O.R., or within any hospital setting.

Now when individuals meet me, as the RN today, she approached saying, “Yes, I’ve heard about you…”

Now a generation of family members under me narrow their eyes, pursing their lips as they look to me and to the person who voiced those words. Listening, they frown more now.

When you read this essay, it may be 103 degrees. Time will tell where I think my family is headed.

I believe that I will still be listening and proofing my articles.

I will still proof my CART work and ensuring (technical events) my clients receive customized results for their unique requests.

I will continue to proof work as I update the “NCRA RPR, CSR, CBC, CCP Written Knowledge Test” textbook, workbook, and companion study guide.

This is my passion. This is my work.

This is why we are keepers of the records, yes?

My opinion is we become disciplined with our listening skills – as it should be.

I hope no one travels my path for the past four years.

I wish you all great health and wonderful adventures.

I know we will continue to be ‘the’ listeners in each group.

This is what I have learned. Words are our O.R.

Part I of III is posted May 2, 2014, Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted May 14, 2014, Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 29, 2014, Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

29 May 2014

The Lesson Behind “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck”, Coach’s Corner

The Lesson Behind “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck”, Coach’s Corner
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Years ago, I wrote “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck.”

My Journal of Court Reporting April 2005 article is posted on my blog “Monette’s Musings” and www.CRRbooks.com.

I detailed how one sentence I shared shifted a student’s focus when she phoned my Court Reporters Reference Books & CDs office to order a product to assist her to advance in her 170 word per minute class.

The student soon graduated and became a court reporter.

Realtime Coach then included “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck” from my JCR “Beyond The Comfort Zone” column as one of their dictations.

Over the years, I have been contacted by students, reporters, CART providers, captioners, and instructors to expand on this topic with my tutoring and empowerment coaching.

Frequently, I see students and veteran court reporters, CART providers, and captioners writing “You’re not stuck!! You’re processing!” on forums and on Facebook.

Often, I see students and reporters referencing my article, name, and the Realtime Coach dictation.

Emails continue to ask that I explain the “processing” concept.

The sentence “you’re processing; you’re not stuck” originated began when I was teaching in the late 1980s.

My students asked why they were not progressing in speed classes while putting in the hours, while enrolled in academic classes, while working full time, and while arriving after a long day for a (full) four-hour evening.

I saw their frustration as their expectations were not met.

Students often “flew” through one speed to then “sit” in another speed.

This varied student to student. Students often compared themselves to other students who were “flying” through a speed class. Students also compared themselves to others who “remain” in a speed class semester after semester.

The court reporting students were challenged by speedbuilding classes; by typing Q & A, Jury Charge, and Literary speed tests; by academics; and by academic tests. (A Legal Terminology or Medical Terminology might have a hundred words per test.)

My parents, both degreed instructors, always asked about my students’ progress.

My father particularly enjoyed helping me as he had listened to my challenges when I was a court reporting student (think my “struggles”). Now he was listening as a guidance counselor, social worker, and father.

“My students work so hard. Sometimes I think they’re working too hard. They become frustrated. I think their frustration may be part venting to progress,” I shared one weekend.

Mr. Emmett, as my father was known to the court reporting industry, with an education and teaching background in science, medical arenas, history, and English, replied, “The mind is like a sponge. The human mind has to take time to absorb information. Tell your students that their mind is like a sponge. When you put a sponge into a glass filled with water, the sponge first absorbs the water. This is a process.”
“They came into the court reporting program with an empty slate, learned new skills, and learned thousands of new words with ‘steno language’. Now their brain, like that sponge in the glass with water, has to take time for the new information to be absorbed.”

“If time is not taken for the absorption – or the process is interrupted – there is an overflow of water or a problem.”

“I saw this when you were a student. You phoned upset and frustrated from your dorm room. I listened, encouraged you to go back to work, and told you that it would come to you,” he continued.

(Instantly, I had flashbacks of moments that were like walking on hot coals, barefoot, then convinced that “it was not coming to me.”)

“Your students are learning a new language and new skills. When they fully process the information they will progress. And it happens when a person least expects it. Yet the work has to be put in. Has to with court reporting skills.”

My mother is a degreed elementary special education teacher. I listened to my parents, in a spirited conversation, discuss young children who learn languages.

There is a window of learning, and 4-year olds are able to easily learn multiple languages with little effort. The “window” closes, as my parents explained, a few years later.

“Their sponge is filling their glass,” my dad continued. “Yes, they continue to learn, but probably never at the same pace, and with such ease. Kindergarten is the most challenging year to teach. Children are open slates. They absorb with great ease,” my father explained.

Mom agreed, “The most qualified instructors are kindergarten teachers because the children learn so quickly.” (Her greatest years teaching, per Mom, were when she was a first grade instructor.)

He then detailed the “open window” for children learning to speak while developing accents.

He offered me scientific and historical data that revealed how people develop accents around the world – and also how children who were found to have been raised under harmful conditions may never have been taught to speak. “Windows close, and this is the same for all cultures,” Dad reinforced.

In short, Mr. Emmett’s scientific point: learning continues, but never at the same pace as the “empty slate” that now has information – similar to that dry sponge being placed into an empty glass. The brain now has information. The sponge has absorbed water.

The conversation came back to my court reporting students.

Mom and Dad discussed how people learn steno theory, progress through specific areas, and then perhaps park. “That is when they are processing information. They have to process to move forward,” my dad said.

Mom nodded and said, “Amen.” Thus, my seed was planted.
With my new understanding of sponges and windows, the next time I saw my students expressing their frustration (after I had worked a very long day in the teaching and court reporting saddle myself) I said, “Your mind is like a brain. Your mind has to process information like a sponge in a glass of water. You’re not stuck. You are processing information. Once you fully process the information, you will progress.”

I was proud of myself until the class howled with laughter, “Your mind is like a brain? A brain? Oh, man, we’re going to put that on your tombstone. That was great!”

Okay, maybe not my finest moment behind the teacher’s desk, yet my “window” was working to assist each student that evening. And each student instantly “processed” the sponge in the glass of water and the window concept.

I now share how “you’re not stuck, you’re processing” was gifted to me, and how I then gifted it my students and to thousands of court reporters, instructors, and to students thereafter.

I also share with all my students that Yoga (which I do every day) has a concept comparing stretching to a kitchen cabinet. When a door is stuck, one does not have the greatest result pulling against the door.

The best effort to release a stuck kitchen door is to gently lean into the stuck door. This releases the pressure. Stretch, gently release, then lean into the stretch for greater results. (We used to post students – as guards – outside my classrooms, so I could teach them specific Yoga techniques.)

That night and whenever I have had the teaching, tutoring, and public speaking opportunity after “your mind is like a brain”, I have witnessed shifts in progress and in focus.

Students saw the correlation to a child effortlessly learning multiple languages and to Yoga and that stuck kitchen cabinet door.

They were able to see the comparison to learning steno theory, to advancing in speedbuilding, and to achieving goals in school and on the job.

They embraced the lesson: “You are not stuck; you are processing.”

Perhaps the mind “is” like a brain with windows and opportunities as we then graduate; we seek perfection in our writing translation rates; and we continue to advance our skills – always seeking accuracy, always progressing, always processing.

You’re processing; you’re not stuck.

I wish each of you and your loved ones a “processing” Happy New Year.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test-Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

“Purple Books” from Court Reporter Reference Books & CATapult CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a State court reporting exam?

“Done in One” – as evidenced by thousands of students and professionals who study the Purple Books from Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test – since 1990. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

Updated “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test-Prep Textbook with the NCRA CRC Primer, 7th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the “Companion Study Guide” cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Complete Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each are listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA and State test-prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

02 Jan 2014

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 1, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

This individual and I have worked together in the past. She emailed with a question requesting numerous sessions.

Again, I found it interesting that the tenacity and goals that were set by this person while enrolled in court reporting school (her words) “who would never make it out of school fast enough” were now similar to today’s scheduled session.

“I’m not going to spend another dime to improve my skills when I have paid so much to get where I am.” (I remained silent.)

“I know people can do what I am trying to do now. If they can do it, why can’t I? I want – No, I need to earn more money. I didn’t go to court reporting school to be at the bottom of a seniority list with working court reporters after this period of time, did I?” (I remained silent.)

The sentence I truly enjoyed (professionally and personally here), “I’ll just get there and take it from there when I do get there, okay?”

I listened to this gainfully employed court reporter.

“The support on my software is about to expire. I have to pay for that, too. And the support on my new writer is about to expire. More money there! All that adds up to a lot of money and it is due very, very soon!”

The reporter summed it up, “I just am wondering exactly why I am doing this now …”

And there we had it. The dancing zebra in the room was bowing and exiting.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

Part II of III is posted May 15, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

01 May 2013

“I Love You,” He Squealed, Part III of III

“I Love You,” He Squealed, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I: He squealed, “I love you!” at the top of his lungs, multiple times, before he was physically removed, gently and lovingly.

How did that happen? The morning began quietly. …

For three months I had been looking for a robe for my hospitalized father and thought perhaps this national store might have one.

Men’s robes are hard to find – outside of Christmas, I am learning. Within the store that did not have men’s robe I saw huge signs. I selected three items, and with two coupons, I went to the intimates counter. (Lines are always shorter.) …

The youngster said, loudly, “Papa chair!” The couple near the child gasped. …

Part II: Then he blew a loud, large raspberry on my arm. That’s when the couple accompanying the child stepped in. They were mortified. Me? Not at all.

The man said, “I’m so sorry! We’re taking him out to be around people. His parents are getting a divorce – six long months! – both are deaf.

“They can’t find interpreters to help them in court. The case continues to be delayed. We’re helping our daughter. She’s deaf.”

Part III: Many professionals now wonder if the lack of words by the young child is due to marital conflicts (“awful things” they said) and “that divorce that is dragging on and on and on.”

“We are taking him with us now to help him to learn to speak.”

I listened, softly sharing what I felt was appropriate.

The grandmother commented that she was impressed I knew sign. She said, “I never learned.”

I did not blink; I did not judge.

She continued, “I never learned because sign interpreters in my daughter’s schools were always changing. Each did a different sign language. There are many.”

I replied, “Yes, 22, as I understand.”

She continued, “Each day my daughter’s signs changed, and I couldn’t keep up … working and raising my children.”

She looked away. She looked so sad.

The grandfather had stepped away, down the aisle. I signed to the youngster; he didn’t sign back.

His grandmother, “I’m so sorry for what he’s done to you. We are going to correct that.”

Again, I repeated that I was fine.

I touched her arm and looked to the young boy.

Then I signed the ASL “I love you” sign.

The child gasped, opened his mouth wide and squealed, “I LOVE YOU!! I love you! I love you!!”

His grandfather scooped him up in his arms while the child loudly repeated his words. He waved the sign overhead with his right hand.

Then I signed the private, family ASL “I love you” sign.

He promptly wiggled out of his grandfather’s arms, solemnly stood on the floor facing me, feet apart, and with sincere emotion, signed a sentence to me and ended the sentence with the formal “I love you” and a salute.

His grandmother now had a pen.

Would I write down the name of the sign interpreting company and details that would help her? “Yes, ma’am.”

I asked if they were members of CODA, Children of Deaf Adults with a national association, state and local chapters?

No, they had never heard of that group.

I maintained my court reporter posture, no facial emotion.

I wrote the name of groups, words, information, and phone numbers that I knew would benefit this family.

When I finished, the grandmother hugged me.

The child was still holding the formal “I love you” sign.
The grandfather was mouthing “thank you” over and over.

Again, he scooped up his grandson and began to walk away.

I could hear the child with his loud, louder and then still louder, “I love you!” as they left the department and entire area of the store.

When I slowly looked back to the register, customers and staff were frozen in posture.

The cashier said, “I knew a deaf person once.”

I did not roll my eyes or exhale.

I listened to the young voice shrieking “I love you!” which could be heard throughout the entire store as he was carried to the front doors.

And I wondered, “What do others think is happening right now?”

My path may never cross this young child or grandparents again.

When I least expect it my path is changed.

The messenger that day was a 4-year old who squealed with delight and grandparents who hugged me for helping their family.

Returning to my office, I placed calls to referrals, adding details, if the grandparents phoned. Each promised to do all they could to help.

I never learned the youngster’s name, yet I will always remember his bright spirit and his signed words.

I wish only the best for the young child who kissed my arm twice, then blew a raspberry. That day, in Intimates, he truly touched my heart, and I left without the robe for my father.

Telling Dad about the event later as a patient in Warm Springs Hospital, Dad smiled a sweet smile and giggled.

Robeless, Dad was ‘working’ to walk again.

He continued to repeat, his mantra, “I still have things I want to do. Busy. Busy. Busy. That’s me!”

And I walked, ever so slowly with Dad, nurses on his left and right, as he pushed himself with each step, holding machines, wires, IVs.

He did not want anyone’s help. “No! “I can do this by myself!” Each time, the nurses would raise their eyebrows and look to me. Each time, I would smile and say, “That’s ‘my’ dad …”

After a walk, we both rested.

Dad smiled a sweet smile as I described details that I am unable to share here.

That day, Dad, the teacher, social worker, guidance counselor, husband and father, agreed with me that the messenger was a 4-year old child learning to speak who clearly has buckets of love he wants to share. Buckets of pure love and grandparents who wish a better world for their family. Amen. May it be so for all of us.

Monette Benoit may be reached for tutoring and coaching: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Part I of III is posted October 5, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted October 17, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted October 28, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal
Motivation Management & Life Coach,
Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com
* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching
All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR or a state court reporting exam?

Monette wants to help you and others to pass your test and to exceed career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and coaching?

Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivation skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Communication skills and daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and coaching?

• Veteran court reporters, CART providers and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re falling behind or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students or veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with one or two key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check It Out: Reach Your Goals! Tutoring and Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit can help you achieve at much high levels. Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material and an instructor, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college.

She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, students and instructors.

She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home, remote, students.

Her one-on-one tutoring has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

28 Oct 2011

How’d You Get Here? Part One

How’d You Get Here? Part One
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2008 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Each person is a story. As I tutor and coach court reporters and students, I am continually asked: “How’d you get through it? How’d you get here?” I sent four questions to leaders – freelance reporters, officials, CART providers, captioners: How were you attracted to court reporting? How did you pick your school? What work did you do? What are you doing now?

I continue to learn, affirming: silent people recording history – court reporters – are fascinating individuals. I firmly believe we are all court reporting students – always– as we expand skills and goals.

Below is the first part of the responses I received.

Diane Emery: My dad was a vice detective and appeared in court. I was a Spanish major at US, University of South Florida, trying to earn a living with a Spanish degree. My dad said you should be a court reporter; it is a good career for a woman. I listened to my dad, went to court with him, talked with the official, Betty Lauria. I figured for a two-year program, I couldn’t go wrong. I loved the idea of being able to work anywhere in the world. The school was in my town. I was typing for the official in federal court when I was at 225 (wpm, word per minute) tests. There was an emergency hearing; I was the only person at the courthouse. The judge told me I was ready to be a reporter according to him, so I started working. Meanwhile, the school went out of business.

I worked in London at Old Bailey criminal court. I worked for a Bradenton freelance firm mainly covering administrative hearings. Then one of the attorneys I worked with saw me crying at a bar on a Friday night and asked why I was crying. I told him I had just quit and didn’t know what I was going to do. He told me to open a firm. I had a manual typewriter and one client. I started my agency in 1982. Diane T. Emery, CMRS, FPR, Executive Reporting Service, St. Petersburg, Florida, Serving Florida with five offices

Jeanette Blalock: I worked as a legal secretary in Texas. An attorney talked to me about reporting; his wife was a court reporter. Soon, I was a student. While in school, I wanted to be an official in court. I rushed through school, as I was going broke quickly. I spent all day at school, then another four to five hours each night on my machine, working on speed.

In a need to finish school faster, I followed my mentor, Monette, to Dallas and had her administer the qualifying exams I needed for Texas state testing. (Monette Benoit one of my beloved teachers from the early days of court reporting school. Here I am, almost 20 years later, still following her across the world. You see, good teachers never go away, they just become close friends)

So I finished school. Too broke to hang around for the next certification exam, I moved to Massachusetts, which was then a state with no certification. I flew back to Texas to take my test.

After being certified, I worked for freelance agencies. I loved the flexibility freelance work affords and managed a Corpus Christi firm. I now own my court reporting business in Alaska.

For years, I lived in the Interior of Alaska, in Delta Junction. I would drive 100 miles to Fairbanks for depositions. During summer months, I welcomed the drive. During winter it would fall to 50 or 60 below zero. Depositions don’t cancel in the extreme cold. Often when you reached your deposition, there was not a place to plug in your vehicle. When this happens, you take breaks every couple of hours to head out and start your car; otherwise, your car will not start at the end of the day.

I now live in Kodiak. The weather is better, so people don’t plug in their vehicles. There’s not an abundance of work, so I help Alaska’s reporters. There are fewer than 20 reporters in the state. Reporters tend to be overworked; I also help with scoping and proofreading.

Opportunities for travel can be interesting. Sometimes reporters are flown to remote villages where they sleep in the school or someone’s cabin. In villages, you are treated to Alaskan delicacies, seal soup, black bear and eggs for breakfast.

Court reporting has opened many fields. As a wordsmith, there are opportunities for variance. I have reported depositions, court, conventions, public meetings and I have provided CART (communication access realtime translation). I’ve followed groups around outdoor construction sites 20 below zero, capturing every word and taking breaks to warm my fingers. I even took a job for a couple of years for the Army as a technical editor.

How’d I get here? Through hard work, determination. And I guess this is where I will stay. For all its wackiness, court reporting seems to be just right for me. Jeanette Blalock, Blue Lake Reporting, Kodiak, Alaska

Kathy Robson: When I was in high school, my dad was on jury duty and came home talking about the court reporter and how interesting that job must be. So I checked into it. The community college nearby had a one-year theory program, so I started there. Then I transferred to another community college with a full program: West Valley College, Saratoga, CA. I believed in using “free” education rather than paying for private schooling. And they do a great job there. I graduated with a great deal of hard work and stick-to-it-iveness. You have to eat, breathe and taste that certification in the final year or so.

I worked as a freelancer for 10 years, then founded Cheetah Systems with my husband, Gary Robson. We became involved in producing captioning software, and so now I’ve been captioning for 15 years.

I have captioned the Oklahoma City bombing, earthquakes, floods and 9/11. One day while I was captioning a game, one of my cows gave birth less than 50 feet from my office window.

CART has allowed privileges. Probably I had the most fun when Deanna Baker married Scott Smith. I realtimed their ceremony to the CompuServe reporters group before anyone realtimed on the Internet. I editorialized what was said, writing who was there, what they were wearing, what Deanna and Scott were wearing, how they were acting, etc. Kathy Robson, RPR, CRR, Red Lodge, Montana

CART provider, official reporter who requested (insisted upon) anonymity: Right out of high school, I answered a computer school advertisement. I met the sales rep at a motel and paid a $100 deposit. The ‘school’ was one room with a few computer manuals and no computer(s) in sight. I’d been duped. When my check came back, it was cashed at a liquor store.

I then enrolled in a school that had mortuary science. (The richest dude in the entire area was the undertaker.) On the first day, they showed us cadavers; half of us dropped and lost our deposits.

In court reporting school, teachers told us about a rich court reporter in a mansion with sweeping staircases and a pool house. The day I graduated from court reporting school, we moved towing a U-haul with my spouse, and children (in cloth diapers). We drove by that mansion of this rich court reporter we always heard about while we were in school. I drove out of my way to see that house. We discovered that house was in a typical government housing tract built after WW II. Reporters in other cities confirmed similar mansion stories they heard when they were court reporting students.

Monette: The last professional is a pillar in our court reporting history. Oh, I begged to have permission to share that story. Trust me, I did.

Each person has a unique story how we got here – how we became involved in the court reporting profession. Did you see the similarities­? I never would have guessed. But they’re here. This court reporter is still learning, still loving it. And you? Next month I share more.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

10 Mar 2008