Press Release: Purple Books Pass Rate 99% for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

The Purple Books, CRRbooks.com, is proud to share: January’s 2017 RPR and multiple State CSR pass rates were over 99%.

CA’s CSR tests in March; NY’s Civil Service Court Reporter test is May; NCRA’s RPR and RDR is April 8 – 20; IL, TX, and WA test April 2017. Additional states and NCRA have exam registration deadlines.

Learn ‘how’ to answer, so you will be Done In One, too.

Complete Set, Purple Books, 4 books: http://crrbooks.com/product/written-exams The ‘Realtime Vocab Workbook’ is $ 8.00 (regular price: $ 36.00) when the Complete Set is ordered.

Trio Set, Purple Books, 3 books: http://crrbooks.com/…/2-trio-test-prep-3-book-set-must-have…

Many students and reporters continue to write “it was the best investment – ever.”

Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and information the Purple Books are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study

Study the only textbook and textbook package for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSRs.
Now, the Purple Books is the only material available for NCRA’s RDR written exam.

The 7th edition textbook for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, State exams, New York’s Civil Service Exam, with the NCRA CRC Primer by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner contains updated, expanded chapters: Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics. Detailed chapters include Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR candidates focus on the popular “Complete Test Prep Set” that includes: *Textbook, **Companion Workbook (*2,002 practice questions), ***Companion Guide (cross references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice questions), and the ****RealTime Vocabulary Workbook.

Questions and multiple choices on exams are not repeated, so don’t try memorizing them. Instead, learn how to take the test!

Thousands of students, novice and long-time reporters advance skills with Purple Books, CRR Books, Test-Prep Material.

Students and professionals also seek tutoring and career counseling with Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer. No two people are alike. Custom sessions are created, per your requests. Start today. Plan and prepare now. Monette wants to help you.
CRRbooks.com Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Purple Books, Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.
Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

See One; Show One; Teach One; Good-Bye, Dad, Part I

See One; Show One; Teach One; Good-Bye, Dad, Part I
By Monette Benoit
All Rights Reserved.

Today, June 19, 2016, is Father’s Day. Originally, I wrote a shorter version for my NCRA (National Court Reporters Association) JCR, Journal of Court Reporting, column, February 2012. Still feeling the loss of both parents – caregiver for both – I share now.

They were married 58 years. She gave the engagement ring back three times.

His father was killed in a car accident less than one week before the wedding.

A child ran into the road. His father swerved missing the first child.

Then, a second child ran to the first child. His father hit a tree, at full speed, to avoid hitting the two children.

After the funeral, everyone (I ‘mean’ everyone) wanted he, the only child, not to marry – soon.

Her mother was dying with cancer. If the wedding did not go forward, she would never see him again. Never.

When they did marry in a quiet wedding, everyone wore black, except the bride.

He fell hard for this Southern belle, professional ballet dancer, degreed opera singer, and student enrolled at the University of Houston to become a special education instructor.

She was working at Sakowitz and Neiman Marcus, while attending school, as a fashion consultant and model. (The engagement ring was from Sakowitz, 15% discount. The bridal gown was from Neiman Marcus with a discount, also, due to her employment.)

When they met, he was employed by the University of Houston and was helping the Veterans Administration build and create a psych department, after his draft ended.

Growing up with my parents and a special-needs brother, I always marveled (my words) “how when it was good, it was very good; when it was not good – you two went to your corners – always.”

In fact, I had a $50 bet that they’d never make it to their 50th anniversary. (Only daughter with multiple brothers and their ‘constant learning challenges’ – this made sense to me…)

When they argued, I softly teased my parents about my bet. They would wince their eyes and glare at me; now and then I received a tart remark.

When my family flew from Texas to the home of a younger brother for their 50th anniversary, I phoned to tell them that we had our rental car.

I shared, “We’re here!” after three airports and a full, long day.

Dad, “Your mother and I are not speaking. I’ll give her the phone.”

My tired eyebrows shot up; my giggles percolated.

Mom, “We are not speaking. When will I see you, honey?”

Laughing, I pleaded, “Mom, pulllese leave him. You, we, have three hours. I can come right now. I promise to give you $50. Pulllese leave him.”

Mom, sweetly, “I will see you in the morning. I love you more than I did since we last talked!” (…how Mommy ended phone calls with me.)

To her husband, “Here! I’m finished.” Click.

The next morning, I raced over to my parents, holding hands, greeting people.

Me, “Dad, what happened last night?”

He, “I don’t remember.”

Me to Mom, “What happened?”

She, “Now is not the time to talk about it. But I will tell you all about it later. Alone. Without him! I stood my ground! I did. We’re so glad you’re here!”

Me, to Dad, “So, this is how you made it to 50 years? You don’t remember? And you, Mom, you’ll tell me later?”

Both giggled, nodding, and hugged each other.

Dad took my hand, “Let’s get a glass of wine. ‘You’ did not win your bet. I did!”

Through the years we joked about that morning Dad and I had a glass of wine because that was his win.

We laughed about it when Mom was seriously ill. Then, Dad soon followed with serious health issues.

Within the blink of an eye, each had ER, ICU, pre-op, medical admissions.

Then, there were parents in two different hospitals, each critically ill.

As the only daughter (court reporter here) I remember verbatim conversations – and am grateful for not winning my $50 bet.

Today, Father’s Day, I know they’re together again – far from here.

Emmett’s Jesuit Catholic beliefs and my mother’s very strong religious beliefs always taught me that they are now together.

I share this as a tribute to the gentleman who was so good to his wife, to his children, his family, and to all.

Dad had a master’s degree in adult education; was a psychologist; social worker; guidance counselor; co-author; chemistry, science, and English teacher who researched linguistics and history – an “avid-life enthusiast” I called him.

Mom had a master’s degree in elementary special education, was a music instructor, and played seven instruments.

For years, I thought everyone’s mother had a xylophone under their bed.

Her mother was a piano prodigy (and court stenographer) with her own orchestra during the Depression.

I still grieve for how Dad died and for the world I now have without his laughter, his checking in, “I do not need an appointment to see my daughter. Never. Never! No matter where you live and no matter where you work your mother and I will stop in to see you. Always. Just like with your brothers…”

They appeared in each state and each courtroom where I worked.

I will always remember working, focused, often head down – then, I would hear Dad cough.

Sheer panic would set in when I looked up to see if they were in the courtroom pews – or worse, in the jury box where a bailiff or judge granted seats to the court reporter’s parents.

With great love, I can hear Dad, “Onward now,” as he gently reached his hand out to me to give me one last hug.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

“The Purple Books” — Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam? Are you worried about student loans?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study “The Purple Books” from Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, computer chapters, and review. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills and daily interaction improvement skills.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

*NO TWO ARE ALIKE. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test-prep material, an instructor, and public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Press Release NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Exams

Press Release NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Exams

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

98% successful pass rate by students and court reporters on NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and on State CSR written exams.

Court Reporter Reference Books has released the revised and updated Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and State CSR Written Test Prep Textbook, Sixth Edition. This textbook is available now on www.CRRbooks.com.

This is the ­most complete written test prep textbook available to students, teachers, and to novice and veteran court reporters.

The textbook by Monette Benoit, an instructor, tutor, career coach, and CART Captioner, has updated and expanded chapters:

Test-Taking Tips, Focus, Grammar, Technology, NCRA COPE Advisory Opinions, and Ethics.

Detailed chapters include: Legal and Latin Terminology, Court Reporting Rules, Grammar, Punctuation, Vocabulary, Misused Words, Definitions, Medical Terminology, and Review.

The popular “Test Prep Set” includes a 4-volume set:
1. Textbook, 6th Edition, Revised, Updated for NCRA’s RPR, RDR, and State CSR;
2. Workbook, (with approximately 2,002 practice test questions and answer key);
3. Companion Study Guide (cross-references every word in the workbook to learn ‘how’ to take a test and specifically ‘how’ to answer a question with multiple choice a-b-c-d);
4. RealTime Vocabulary Workbook (expands vocabulary growth with word recognition and comprehension to help students and reporters know how to identify and how to build words)

*** NCRA’s RDR test candidates successfully use the only textbook and only realtime vocabulary workbook to earn the most elite RDR, Registered, Diplomate Reporter, certification within the court reporting profession.

“Get ‘Er Done In Just One” – Study the “purple books” that are pedagogically sound and cover a wealth of material with facts and information. Testimonials from students, instructors, and court reporters are online for you to review.

All material is time-tested, proven for both the classroom and independent study.

CRRbooks.com lists complete details.

The Lesson Behind “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck”, Coach’s Corner

The Lesson Behind “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck”, Coach’s Corner
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Years ago, I wrote “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck.”

My Journal of Court Reporting April 2005 article is posted on my blog “Monette’s Musings” and www.CRRbooks.com.

I detailed how one sentence I shared shifted a student’s focus when she phoned my Court Reporters Reference Books & CDs office to order a product to assist her to advance in her 170 word per minute class.

The student soon graduated and became a court reporter.

Realtime Coach then included “You’re Processing; You’re Not Stuck” from my JCR “Beyond The Comfort Zone” column as one of their dictations.

Over the years, I have been contacted by students, reporters, CART providers, captioners, and instructors to expand on this topic with my tutoring and empowerment coaching.

Frequently, I see students and veteran court reporters, CART providers, and captioners writing “You’re not stuck!! You’re processing!” on forums and on Facebook.

Often, I see students and reporters referencing my article, name, and the Realtime Coach dictation.

Emails continue to ask that I explain the “processing” concept.

The sentence “you’re processing; you’re not stuck” originated began when I was teaching in the late 1980s.

My students asked why they were not progressing in speed classes while putting in the hours, while enrolled in academic classes, while working full time, and while arriving after a long day for a (full) four-hour evening.

I saw their frustration as their expectations were not met.

Students often “flew” through one speed to then “sit” in another speed.

This varied student to student. Students often compared themselves to other students who were “flying” through a speed class. Students also compared themselves to others who “remain” in a speed class semester after semester.

The court reporting students were challenged by speedbuilding classes; by typing Q & A, Jury Charge, and Literary speed tests; by academics; and by academic tests. (A Legal Terminology or Medical Terminology might have a hundred words per test.)

My parents, both degreed instructors, always asked about my students’ progress.

My father particularly enjoyed helping me as he had listened to my challenges when I was a court reporting student (think my “struggles”). Now he was listening as a guidance counselor, social worker, and father.

“My students work so hard. Sometimes I think they’re working too hard. They become frustrated. I think their frustration may be part venting to progress,” I shared one weekend.

Mr. Emmett, as my father was known to the court reporting industry, with an education and teaching background in science, medical arenas, history, and English, replied, “The mind is like a sponge. The human mind has to take time to absorb information. Tell your students that their mind is like a sponge. When you put a sponge into a glass filled with water, the sponge first absorbs the water. This is a process.”
“They came into the court reporting program with an empty slate, learned new skills, and learned thousands of new words with ‘steno language’. Now their brain, like that sponge in the glass with water, has to take time for the new information to be absorbed.”

“If time is not taken for the absorption – or the process is interrupted – there is an overflow of water or a problem.”

“I saw this when you were a student. You phoned upset and frustrated from your dorm room. I listened, encouraged you to go back to work, and told you that it would come to you,” he continued.

(Instantly, I had flashbacks of moments that were like walking on hot coals, barefoot, then convinced that “it was not coming to me.”)

“Your students are learning a new language and new skills. When they fully process the information they will progress. And it happens when a person least expects it. Yet the work has to be put in. Has to with court reporting skills.”

My mother is a degreed elementary special education teacher. I listened to my parents, in a spirited conversation, discuss young children who learn languages.

There is a window of learning, and 4-year olds are able to easily learn multiple languages with little effort. The “window” closes, as my parents explained, a few years later.

“Their sponge is filling their glass,” my dad continued. “Yes, they continue to learn, but probably never at the same pace, and with such ease. Kindergarten is the most challenging year to teach. Children are open slates. They absorb with great ease,” my father explained.

Mom agreed, “The most qualified instructors are kindergarten teachers because the children learn so quickly.” (Her greatest years teaching, per Mom, were when she was a first grade instructor.)

He then detailed the “open window” for children learning to speak while developing accents.

He offered me scientific and historical data that revealed how people develop accents around the world – and also how children who were found to have been raised under harmful conditions may never have been taught to speak. “Windows close, and this is the same for all cultures,” Dad reinforced.

In short, Mr. Emmett’s scientific point: learning continues, but never at the same pace as the “empty slate” that now has information – similar to that dry sponge being placed into an empty glass. The brain now has information. The sponge has absorbed water.

The conversation came back to my court reporting students.

Mom and Dad discussed how people learn steno theory, progress through specific areas, and then perhaps park. “That is when they are processing information. They have to process to move forward,” my dad said.

Mom nodded and said, “Amen.” Thus, my seed was planted.
With my new understanding of sponges and windows, the next time I saw my students expressing their frustration (after I had worked a very long day in the teaching and court reporting saddle myself) I said, “Your mind is like a brain. Your mind has to process information like a sponge in a glass of water. You’re not stuck. You are processing information. Once you fully process the information, you will progress.”

I was proud of myself until the class howled with laughter, “Your mind is like a brain? A brain? Oh, man, we’re going to put that on your tombstone. That was great!”

Okay, maybe not my finest moment behind the teacher’s desk, yet my “window” was working to assist each student that evening. And each student instantly “processed” the sponge in the glass of water and the window concept.

I now share how “you’re not stuck, you’re processing” was gifted to me, and how I then gifted it my students and to thousands of court reporters, instructors, and to students thereafter.

I also share with all my students that Yoga (which I do every day) has a concept comparing stretching to a kitchen cabinet. When a door is stuck, one does not have the greatest result pulling against the door.

The best effort to release a stuck kitchen door is to gently lean into the stuck door. This releases the pressure. Stretch, gently release, then lean into the stretch for greater results. (We used to post students – as guards – outside my classrooms, so I could teach them specific Yoga techniques.)

That night and whenever I have had the teaching, tutoring, and public speaking opportunity after “your mind is like a brain”, I have witnessed shifts in progress and in focus.

Students saw the correlation to a child effortlessly learning multiple languages and to Yoga and that stuck kitchen cabinet door.

They were able to see the comparison to learning steno theory, to advancing in speedbuilding, and to achieving goals in school and on the job.

They embraced the lesson: “You are not stuck; you are processing.”

Perhaps the mind “is” like a brain with windows and opportunities as we then graduate; we seek perfection in our writing translation rates; and we continue to advance our skills – always seeking accuracy, always progressing, always processing.

You’re processing; you’re not stuck.

I wish each of you and your loved ones a “processing” Happy New Year.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test-Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

“Purple Books” from Court Reporter Reference Books & CATapult CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a State court reporting exam?

“Done in One” – as evidenced by thousands of students and professionals who study the Purple Books from Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test – since 1990. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

Updated “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test-Prep Textbook with the NCRA CRC Primer, 7th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the “Companion Study Guide” cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Complete Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each are listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA and State test-prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part III of III

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I began: Part I began: One student, in the 225 wpm (words per minute) exit room in a court reporting program, “is scared to death of passing the state certification test and national certification. Then people will see that I can’t write accurately! I changed almost everything in my theory to brief forms, one strokes, to pass my tests. I was told to do this to advance in my speed classes. Everyone is doing this! I read through all my errors on each test! … Help me.” …

Part II began: Softly, I replied, “Perhaps you do not want to swan dive into the mind games.” …

We each can evolve to a better “spot” when we choose opportunities or when we are given ultimatums, yes?

Perhaps there has never been a better time to expand your skills. Spot on, yes?

Or perhaps you believe there has to be a “secret sauce” to reaching your goal, your desired result.

Where do you want to be in three months? Three weeks? Tomorrow at 3:00?

Part III of III:

Many court reporters are nearing retirement.

This will open new markets for individuals who are intent on shifting with expanding, new opportunities. Big fact.

In short, what might conflict with your goals to meet new opportunities, and what energy might expand your current strengths? This is one of many focus topics within my tutoring and empowerment coaching.

As you discover the specifics to the above-listed details in your private and professional world you will then be able to make choices to propel you to organize your fears.

Perhaps we are struggling too hard. Perhaps we want to know more about our fears.

I believe that organizing fears is a powerful step to moving toward your distinctive goals – whether it is to read your accurate notes in school to transcribe a test, whether it is to train yourself for a better position with your work, or whether a goal is to follow your heart’s desire with a new path that you create.

Fear can be a motivator.

Setbacks can be a motivator, too.

We know this “motivator” with 95 percent accuracy each day that we are required to earn while in school. We know this with the required accuracy on each job. Fact.

Once we have identified the fear(s) then we can focus on what is beckoning with all our resources and with our multi-faceted talents.

For the next two weeks I would like to suggest that you make a list of your goals, a list containing your fears, and a list of what is between the goal(s) and the fear(s).

As you explore your list for two weeks (okay, one week if you desire), I promise you that you will see your path and your challenges from a different lens.

I believe that when you understand what is truly inspiring you, and what is limiting you, you are then the master of your possibilities. Spot on focus.

We know that history has been exacted because we, court reporters, were motivated – with exacting discipline.

We are inspired and encouraged to be our best. Again, this is our normal.

Always we simply reinforce, and always we expand our skills. Always we explore.

Always we simply realign, and always we identify our goals.

Always we seek to identify our resistance to our current goals.

And perhaps we want to focus upon owning our fears.

I wish you wonderful growth, vast professional success, and an awesome, peaceful holiday.

Spot on, and yes, this is our normal. Fact.

Part I of III is posted November 14, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted December 5, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted December 20, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part I of III

Fears, Toughest Part Is Words, Spot On, and Our Normal, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I of III:

One student, in the 225 wpm (words per minute) exit room in a court reporting program, “is scared to death of passing the state certification test and national certification. Then people will see that I can’t write accurately! I changed almost everything in my theory to brief forms, one strokes, to pass my tests. I was told to do this to advance in my speed classes. Everyone is doing this!

“I read through all my errors on each test! I passed each speed by being lucky, remembering what was said in the 5-minute test, and by hearing a test that I had heard before …. And I learned a good realtime theory! Now I am scared that an employer will see all the mistakes that I am making. I cannot realtime! Not at all as I read through the errors. My dictionary is so messed up with the entries I added and changed. This was just to pass tests! I had to do this to be able to stay in the school and not have my student loans called in. Now what do I do? Who will hire someone who cannot realtime? Help me.”

Another student in the 180 wpm class “recently enrolled in the 100 wpm class to learn how to really write and how to pass tests. I had to go to the owner of the school to do this. The school was not happy. Other students became upset, too, as they are having big problems, too. And my family is not happy! Yet I know what I have to do to be able to read my notes. My theory is a compilation of theories in a notebook given to me by the school, and I have no dictionary!” the student shared. “Where do I start to finish?”

A nationally certified court reporter now providing CART, Communication Access Realtime Translation, “may soon be replaced by a summary service, like Typewell, not a verbatim record. What do I do now? I worked evenings and weekends to assist everyone for years and years. What do I do now?”

Another certified court reporter requested tutoring as she is teaching herself a new theory, teaching herself how to CART, and how to caption while reporting during the day and while teaching in the evening. “I have to do this or I will be replaced …”

One court reporter, now in court, was recently called into the manager’s office while reporting a jury trial and told “you must become certified asap or you will lose your job.” The reporter then asked me, “I’ll have to join NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, to get my certs now, right? Can you help me asap?”

I listen to each with respect. Each person has unique challenges.

Each person has, in my professional opinion, unique opportunities to excel in the direction which will serve their immediate goals and their long-term goals.

Each person serves our profession – as working professionals, as instructors guiding our wonderful profession, and as students seeking to graduate.

Many students privately share with me, “I need to earn the big bucks to pay off my massive student loans. Some students owe over $ 30,000. I know people who owe well over $ 40,000 and stay in school just so their loans won’t be called in. Then we pay thousands more per semester, and we are not passing tests!”

One of my favorite sentences was voiced by a professional sharing “professional” frustrations, after receiving NCRA results. The judicial court reporter said, “The toughest part is the words. It’s that simple, Monette.”

This is the same court reporter who while working to pass the national RPR, Register Professional Reporter, then the CCP, Certified CART Provider, and then CRR, Certified Realtime Reporter, asked me each time as we worked together, “What should I work on? Should I just read Webster’s dictionary?”

The reporter wrote recently, “Thanks for my Buck-Up Speech each time. I needed that. I know I passed each test. Yet it really wasn’t as bad as I tried to make it out each time after working with you. Now what should I work toward? What is next on my list, Monette?”

I know this court reporter likes a busy plate. Do you?

One student wrote, “I am writing cleaner. I feel a pass coming soon. I shouldn’t be focusing on what other everyone else is doing, right? When someone passes a test in my class sometimes I get mad at them. They are not working as hard as I am – I think. Then I am upset with myself for thinking that. Like you say, it’s all about me, right? Focus on me.” That week this student passed her two certifying exit speed tests.

Working with another student, the student said, “Wow, Monette, you sure took the saddle off that elephant, and I now have to choose a better path, right?”

Part I of III is posted November 14, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted December 5, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted December 20, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Dr. Vincent Di Maio, Expert Witness, Part I of III

Dr. Vincent Di Maio, Expert Witness, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit,
All Rights Reserved.

Part I of III

Dr. Vincent Di Maio recently testified as a forensic pathologist for the defense in the State of Florida vs. George Zimmerman. He is consistently described “as a legend.”

Watching Dr. Di Maio on CNN’s live coverage, he detailed his background, and his work as Chief Medical Examiner, M.E., for Bexar County, Texas.

For the court reporter, he said, “It is spelled B-e-x-a-r and pronounced ‘bear’ ” …

Dr. Di Maio is recognized in San Antonio for his forensic work as our M.E., his testimony in court, teaching at UTSA, and for his many professional and personal contributions.

Our paths crossed early 1980s when he was considered “new” in Bexar County.

One morning I learned Dr. Di Maio was called as an expert witness and M.E. to testify in a criminal trial I was reporting.

Professionals approached me, “He knows his work; you’ll have to interrupt. He’s fast.”

I looked to the 12-person jury seated on this murder trial; Dr. Di Maio entered. He had a file under his right arm; he wasted no steps entering the witness box.

He looked to me, inches away, and said, “I’m fast,” as he sat. I displayed no reaction, per my work. Dr. Di Maio was duly sworn.

During my first two years as a court reporter I reported 30-plus doctors almost every morning. (Many doctors were eager to get back to their office. Many did not want to testify, sharing their work. They voiced their dissatisfaction about having to wait for their scheduled time and therefore, were incredibly fast.) Resulting from that work, reporters shared brief forms with me for CVs, schools, and medical terms, phrases, and acronyms rattled off at rocket speeds. Tapes were “illegal.” You “got it” or you “interjected.”

My first year I still remember the 3-plus hours I researched anti-butazolidin alka, a drug not yet on the market – before the Internet. Just another good day at the office, yes?

When Dr. Di Maio began his qualifications, I had multiple one-strokers for medical terms and words that he shared. He watched my hands on my steno machine. He was keenly aware of the court reporter.

He did share “fast” words about his schooling, his background, prior work – long before attorneys approached his work to qualify him as expert witness and medical examiner.

Dr. Di Maio spoke, I stroked. He continued to watch my hands.

During a bench conference, he asked if I was okay.

Due to his reputation as a fast speaker, which he acknowledged, and his attention to exacting detail I gave him a hand gesture that I was okay. (Perhaps the gesture could be interpreted as “faster.” I remember his laughter.)

He finished his qualifications and M.E. details. He was accepted as an expert by the attorneys and court. Testimony began.

Part I of III is posted October 5, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted October 15, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted October 30, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

The Final Frontier: Nolo Contendere, Guilty, Part III of III

The Final Frontier: Nolo Contendere, Guilty, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
September 27, 2013

Part I and II began: Court reporters are a disciplined breed. This is reinforced as I move through my professional and personal world.

“The final frontier” is a metaphor. I was encouraged to write this as I trolled this topic past professionals, court reporters, broadcast captioners, CART providers, instructors, and students that I am tutoring and coaching. Guilty.

Court reporters listen with laser focus. I have listened to individuals, doctors, speak – a lot.

When specialists have finished long sentences, often I am asked “Have any questions?”

Often, I shake my head. When I am asked why I don’t have any questions I have replied, “The good news is that the patient does not have the diagnosis that you thought was causing the problem. The bad news is that you don’t know what’s causing the problem.”

Not often, the specialist asks, “How’d you do that?”

Rarely, will I share, “Degree in listening.”

Often, I reply, “I listened.” …

Part II: … Me: “No can do. Court reporter. Only time I see word ‘arrested,’ is with work. ‘Patient arrested’ … Not signing until defined.”

EMT: “Your mother arrested on the table. You’re not supposed to know. We’re not allowed to tell you. You need to sign. We must transport now; she needs isolation.” (Code for: “The hospital’s discharge policy was at 5:00 today, and it’s past 5:00 now.)

My court reporter discipline, in my opinion, appeared again. Guilty.

I will not be hurried when asked to sign documents. I quietly insist on reading every line…

Part III of III:

The final frontier involves so many court reporters, CART providers, captioners, and students who share that they will not sign anything without reading every line, too. They insist on a copy of everything they sign, too. When they read documents to sign, everyone in the room sighs – while they calmly read, too. Discipline, yes. Guilty.

A high-profile official court reporter. “I took three hours to read mortgage papers. I took five hours signing a 15-year mortgage. When I bought a car on 24 installments, the dealer closed at 8 p.m. I left at 9:30 p.m. It drives my family crazy.” Nolo contendere.

We are not rattled when we are asking for information at work or at home, regarding a family member and advancing our skills. We listen.

We have no shortcuts to listening.

When people need events preserved, we are there. Always present. Always listening. Guilty as charged.

Update: The cardiologist, after listening to me (I measured each word), said, “She really slipped through the cracks.”

Ah, a leader! I sat tall, softly asked, “Will you be Top Dog? I want all the other dogs to report to you. Is this doable?”

Wearing surgical scrubs (with booties), he said, “Absolutely! I’ll ensure I’m faxed daily details. I’ll write orders for it.” I almost hugged the man.

When transport returned my mom to her room, I watched the scampering with individuals who said, “We sent over the wrong paperwork again? And he wants what? Daily?”

Softly, I said, “That man is now Top Dog. Thank you for making this possible.”

The final frontier. I have now have Top Dog. This is our discipline. I am off the sidelines. I asked a doctor to be Village Chief to help with my dad when I saw Dad’s road turning (Robert Frost, “The Road Not Taken”). My Village Chief then was HOH (hard of hearing); we worked as a team. (In September 2011 I wrote an article for my column, “My Village Chief is HOH.”)

Now I have Top Dog to help my mom. Yes, Mom does have God as a roommate. Guilty. The final frontier necessitates continued attention to detail, continued focus, and much listening. Guilty without an explanation.

The day after submitting this article for my “Journal of Court Reporting” column, a “care nurse” phoned to schedule a meeting.

Me: “Sure. I request a list of all Mom’s diagnoses and meds.”

Voice pitched, she was off to the races. When she refused to give me this, I listened, believing I was not going to win this battle – on the phone. I know that I am entitled to this information by law and chose not to “word” engage with her.

She ended with, “This meeting is just for you to come and listen. It is not for chit-chat.” (Code for: “We have to meet with you approximately every 60 to 90 days per Medicare and our licensing.”)

We had our meeting. The “care nurse” was not present. At the end, with my copy of meds and diagnoses that I had requested on the phone, they asked me – oh, yes, they did – to sign a document.

Me in realtime: “I want a copy.”

Multiple people: “It’s for our files. Sign here (indicating).”

I leaned in, “If I sign, I get a copy.”

They actually said, “That’s okay, then.”

In a swift poker move, I put my hand on it, pulled the document toward me.

Court reporter here read each line with speed-reading skills. Then I lifted my hand. I stood, departed document-less knowing that they remain signature-less. Nolo Contendere.

Part I of III is posted September 5, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com
Part II of III is posted September 16, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com
Part III of III is posted September 27, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects, Part II of III

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects, Part II of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
July 28, 2013

Part I began: The nurse, RN, was speaking to me about my mother’s recent ICU discharge when overhead speakers broadcast a doctor’s page. He cupped one hand over the back of each ear. I watched, sans comment.

I am witnessing many medical professionals with hearing loss…

He said softly, “Don’t tell anyone. I have hearing loss.”

I nodded, “I see that you have coping skills to assist you.”

“You noticed?” he replied.

Me, “Yes, sir. Due to my work.”

Mom tells everyone, every shift, “My daughter is a court reporter, a teacher, and she’s an author …”

I was prepared to not pursue this topic. However, I find 99 percent of people who have hearing loss do want to detail their world with me. I listen, humbled, learning from each.

He said, “Most people don’t notice. My wife’s worse! She’s the one I worry about. I’ll tell you tomorrow, okay?” I nodded.

We returned to our task – “required gowning with gloves and mask in the hall before entering.”

He asked how I was familiar with hearing loss. I shared “court reporter, CART provider, captioner, consultant.”

This nurse said, “My wife and children have serious issues. I just have hearing loss. But I know what I want before I lose my hearing.”

“My wife has glaucoma. When she was a teen she took glaucoma medicine to decrease her eye pressure. The medicine also decreases inner ear pressure and damages nerves. Her hearing loss now is from medicine long ago. What’s worse than that?”

“Each generation then has hearing loss from the parent’s medicine.”

Part II of III

My eyes were as big as saucers as I listened to this man talk about the glaucoma medicine and generational effects.

He summed it up, “Tomorrow I’ll tell you what I want. I probably won’t get it. Yet I have to have hopes. Right?”

The next day, this nurse sprang from his chair as I entered to visit Mom isolated with MRSA, pseudomonosis, and additional ICU sterile lung bacteria.

“I’ve been waiting for you. I told my wife about you and court reporters. We know all about your work. We thank you and your profession for helping us. Once I tell you what I really want, could you tell me how to help my 12-year old?” I nodded.

I whipped out my iPad, asked permission to write notes.

He said, “Sure! Let’s go look at the latest and greatest. It’s not well known, but it could be once the price comes down. And with glaucoma patients and their children’s children – and their children – they’re all going to need your help.”

We hunkered together and looked up “tympanoplasty.” The prostheses resembles a small earring. Hearing must be present.

He emphasized, “This is different than cochlear implants. It’s titanium. Implants require relearning sounds and have differing results. This titanium tympanoplasty device is shaped to fit into each ear. It originated in Germany.”

The nurse shared that his wife and children are not prostheses candidates due to their “glaucoma medicine-induced hearing loss” (each child has never had glaucoma, nor do they have the gene).

He shared, “Medical costs are $30,000; insurance doesn’t cover it – yet. But I could hear again with this. I’ve done my homework. Now I just have to find a doctor who will do the surgery and not want thirty grand,” he said tenderly.

Later that day, he found me in the hallway – staring at the floor – wearing the isolation gown – holding the required gloves, sans mask.

Now he held a notepad; he asked how he could help his family.

“One son already has problems. He’s been bullied. I taught him karate for discipline and confidence. His speech is now thick-tongued as pressure in his ears create hearing loss from his mother’s glaucoma medicine before he was born.”

Part I is posted July 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com
Part II is posted July 28, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com
Part III is posted August 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects, Part I of III

Titanium Technology and Glaucoma Effects
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
July 11, 2013

Part I of III

The nurse, RN, was speaking to me about my mother’s recent ICU discharge when overhead speakers broadcast a doctor’s page. He cupped one hand over the back of each ear. I watched, sans comment.

I am witnessing many medical professionals with hearing loss.

Yet these moments are far more frequent than years ago – especially during the past two years deep in the medical trenches as I viewed my father’s care prior to his death.

Perhaps it is my antenna as I view Mom’s challenges to “avoid death’s door” (a termed given to Mom) wherein I see many people now working with hearing loss.

He said softly, “Don’t tell anyone. I have hearing loss.”

I nodded, “I see that you have coping skills to assist you.”

“You noticed?” he replied.

Me, “Yes, sir. Due to my work.”

Mom tells everyone, every shift, “My daughter is a court reporter, a teacher, and she’s an author …”

I simply bow my head. On many occasions I have been so happy Mom is alive that I avoid the “daughter sigh.”

I was prepared to not pursue this topic. However, I find 99 percent of people who have hearing loss do want to detail their world with me. I listen, humbled, learning from each.

He said, “Most people don’t notice. My wife’s worse! She’s the one I worry about. I’ll tell you tomorrow, okay?” I nodded.

We returned to our task – “required gowning with gloves and mask in the hall before entering.”

The next day the nurse met me. “I’ve been waiting for you.”

He asked how I was familiar with hearing loss. I shared “court reporter, CART provider, captioner, consultant.”

This nurse said, “My wife and children have serious issues. I just have hearing loss. But I know what I want before I lose my hearing.”

“My wife has glaucoma. When she was a teen she took glaucoma medicine to decrease her eye pressure. The medicine also decreases inner ear pressure and damages nerves. Her hearing loss now is from medicine long ago. What’s worse than that?”

“Each generation then has hearing loss from the parent’s medicine.”

“Our children have decreased hearing and so will their children. One son is 12. He has huge decreased hearing. I worry about our children.”

He paused before continuing.

“Since their hearing loss is more severe, their treatments come first. I’ve studied genetics about this. The fear of losing eyesight and hearing is devastating to my wife and to our children. That’s why we’re not going to have any more children. And my work …” his voice trailed off.

He beamed, “But I know exactly what I want. It’s state-of-the-art.”

Part I is posted July 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com
Part II is posted July 28, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com
Part III is posted August 11, 2013, www.monettebenoit.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Ouch. That Hurt My Ears! Part III of III

Ouch. That Hurt My Ears! Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
June 2013

Part I began: Another errand. Another task to be completed.

My mother has been hospitalized for a while now. We have serious issues – to include ICU and MRSA isolation (multiple hospital bacteria, each gifted to Mom – again).

Yesterday Mom’s twin brother died.

When he was a Marine (enlisting ‘underage’ without telling his mother) Mom’s twin brother served on the front lines in Iwo Jima, Okinawa, Gudalcanal, and numerous other battles.

When her twin brother was shot, Mom woke, crying at 4:30 a.m. …

… Each time the double doors opened the cashier gasped.

She lowered her head, placing one hand over each ear as she winced. Stunned, I watched.

Then the woman said, “It is so windy outside! Every time the doors open it hurts my ears. Ouch!” …

Part II began:

Faith, “Mom resisted for so long… Mom didn’t think it would work. This is the funny part. Just as the lady turned on the sound machine to test her hearing the air conditioning unit went off. That pressure hurt Mom’s ears. She said, ‘Ouch! That hurts!’ Then Mom was angry at the noise. My step-dad and I laughed. Then Mom was angry with us for laughing. So we laughed harder until she ‘finally’ understood that she was angry at our laughing and ‘that’ was sound. Her first sound in 30 years. Then she laughed.”

I smiled. Faith continued, “Now my son has a hearing loss, too. He has the gene, I guess. He just finished a tour in Afghanistan. He missed the hearing test! And he wanted to serve so bad! So he wrote his quartermaster a letter telling him how much it would mean to serve. And his letter worked! They took him! He served, though failing the hearing test was not shared with others … He’s just come home. That’s why I agreed to get the implant. I may have grandchildren soon. I want to hear everything! Everything!”

Part III:

I asked, “Your mother has nine siblings with hearing loss? You and your son have a hearing loss?”

She laughed, “Yes! And it’s been perfectly normal for us. Mom didn’t want to hear all of us when we were kids – she used to tease us. It’s all been perfectly normal. Now she can hear perfect! Soon I will, too. And I have tinnitus and that hurts, too. Ouch, the doors just opened again.”

The woman behind me wore dark eyeglasses, a large hat.

She shoved a bag onto the counter, and chin down said, “This doesn’t work. Here!”

Watching the rude woman I paused before taking two steps away from the counter. Faith was beaming with a huge smile. She winked at me, took the bag and asked the woman, “How may I help you?” The frowning woman never looked Faith in the eye. She snarked and barked at Faith.

Yet Faith smiled at me for the longest time. When the doors next opened, Faith winced. She did not cover her ears.

Dramatically, she pointed to one ear, slowly mouthing “cochlear implant.” Then she laughed.

I held my bag of sympathy cards for my mother’s twin brother’s family, headed to the door and tried to exit opening one door just a little (to avoid pressure on Faith’s ears).

The wind gusts grabbed the door from my hand and flew wide open.

Frozen, I looked back at Faith. Her beaming smile remained and Faith said, loudly, “Thank you. Thank you for telling me about the successes! Two weeks! Can’t wait!”

Oh, this lady touched my heart.

Her hope and enthusiasm will serve her well as she welcomes ‘sound’ back into her world.

Had it not been for the need for sympathy cards for my mom (which Mom cannot select due to her hospitalization), traveling a new road on an abnormally windy day – I would have missed this opportunity to meet Faith. And I am grateful she shared.

Faith and her son – each choosing to receive cochlear implants – will have opportunities and choices that many people with hearing loss previously were not afforded.

And the Deaf community’s reaction?

Oh, that’s a whole nuther kettle of fish.

Cochlear implants are not for everyone; this I know from CARTing and captioning many seminars where individuals shared from podiums (and privately to me).

Yet, for Faith, per Faith, this is going to change everything for Faith.

And isn’t that grand? She has choices.
“And three generations with implants,” Faith repeatedly emphasized.

As I stood, bag in hand with the sympathy cards, Faith shared that when her first mother heard the air conditioning noise voicing her first ‘sound’ sentence, “Ouch, that hurts” – her mother’s second sentence was “Isn’t Jesus great?”

Faith shared “Isn’t Jesus great?” is now their family motto when it comes to loss of hearing and to increasing their hearing.

One of my personally challenging days turned into a sweet, memorable day gifted by an enthusiastic woman “waiting to hear again.” And “isn’t that great?” I now ask you?

Part I of III is posted June 3, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings
Part II of III is posted June 14, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings
Part III of III is posted June 25, 2013 on the blog Monette’s Musings

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now, Part II of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part II of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 15, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

We agreed to assess goals that had been met as a student and to evaluate where she is now as a certified court reporter.

The court reporter then said (I have permission to share) “When I was going to school then, I was not putting in as much as I should have. Then working with you, I decided I could do this – I really could do this. I decided to not do this and to not do that, but to really do this and to not make excuses. That was how I came a long way. I focused as you advised.”

Thus, we spent our time working together constructively, realistically focusing.

Instead of focusing on the loud voice in her head, we focused on the tasks that would realistically work with her present schedule and her goals now. Today.

Her question “exactly why am I doing this now?” remained with me after we scheduled updates and ended our time together.

This very question itself, in my opinion, will give you freedom.

Have you asked yourself this question and identified what is important?

Have you asked yourself this question on a good day – and not when events are comedy for Saturday Night Live?

I believe this is an excellent question. We take risks when we ask the question, “Why?”

Together we focused on the nutrition for the goals.

The court reporter and I made a conscious choice to create strength with training while working.

What I heard the court reporter say – and what was identified later by her words – were her fears. I heard, “I am afraid …” Her true fears were shared “straight up.”

Yes, I could hear fear in her voice, as well as the frustration.

Part I of III is posted May 1, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III

Exactly Why Am I Doing This Now? Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
May 1, 2013

The requested tutor and empowerment coaching appointment began with a simple question.

My question to the court reporter was simply, “How are you?”

There was a loud sigh. The answer began, “I am so tired of …” I watched the clock. How long? Over five minutes. I did not peep one word as I listened. After a noticeable silence, the court reporter asked me what I was thinking.

Soflty, I said, “Wow, that was almost a five-minute literary test. Now please tell me what you really think.” She howled with laughter.

Ah, court reporters and court reporting students.

When someone asks us what we think, and the question is posed by someone (my opinion here) related to our field, we can really let the words fly, yes? Yes.

This individual and I have worked together in the past. She emailed with a question requesting numerous sessions.

Again, I found it interesting that the tenacity and goals that were set by this person while enrolled in court reporting school (her words) “who would never make it out of school fast enough” were now similar to today’s scheduled session.

“I’m not going to spend another dime to improve my skills when I have paid so much to get where I am.” (I remained silent.)

“I know people can do what I am trying to do now. If they can do it, why can’t I? I want – No, I need to earn more money. I didn’t go to court reporting school to be at the bottom of a seniority list with working court reporters after this period of time, did I?” (I remained silent.)

The sentence I truly enjoyed (professionally and personally here), “I’ll just get there and take it from there when I do get there, okay?”

I listened to this gainfully employed court reporter.

“The support on my software is about to expire. I have to pay for that, too. And the support on my new writer is about to expire. More money there! All that adds up to a lot of money and it is due very, very soon!”

The reporter summed it up, “I just am wondering exactly why I am doing this now …”

And there we had it. The dancing zebra in the room was bowing and exiting.

Now that the energy had been expelled in a healthy manner – and we were clear that we would focus together – we began an open dialog for the goals.

Part II of III is posted May 15, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted May 24, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

How’d That Happen? And Real-Time Captioners, Part III of III

How’d That Happen? And Real-Time Captioners, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
April 2013

Part I began: As we listen, as we scan and troll, now and then a moment may stop us in our tracks. Each track depends on where we are at that moment. Each track when viewed over one’s shoulder, as hindsight, may appear to be very different.

And this is why I am still tilting my head asking “How’d that happen?”

Recently a mail list shared by court reporters, captioners, CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) providers, instructors, and students, someone posted a link “Appendix A, Hourly Pay for Real-Time Captioners.” Levels were identified with hourly rates. Each level states, “a minimum captioning speed of … and recommendation by the Director.” Appendix A ends: …

Part II began: Yet I know in 1993 when I began to CART in San Antonio, Texas, the sign interpreters negotiated (they used that word) for me “since you arrive with all your equipment and work solo.”

Back then there was no word for CART.

Part III: We became a team, all working together. Why? To provide the best service we could together is my humble reply. And we have had a lot of fun in “our” trench together, and the interpreters continue to be my friends and my advocates.

They tease me that that the only equipment they purchase is the one-color outfit. (Interpreters usually wear one color, so individuals needing their skills watch hand motions and facial expressions without distractions of colors and designs.)

And they teased me, “You? George Carlin has a routine about packing, then packing with less to then pack with less. Have you heard Carlin’s routine?” Their teasing was not mean spirited. Oh, I listened.

I listened to their teasing, their wisdom, their teaching how I should structure my rates. They taught me when there was no one to ask.

Remote interpreting has changed their world, even as it has changed for CART providers.

Now we are where are. We knew then that the MTV generation would change the world. We knew then that cochlear implants would change their world. We knew then that our technology “captioning without video” (as many referenced CART after my work) would change the world.

Now we have the ability to look over our shoulders and to reflect from whence we have come, where we are now, and where we seek to direct our paths.

Yet I am still pondering, how is it that a college posted qualifications and rates for “Real-Time Captioners” that might stun many who completed court reporting school and purchased equipment to provide this CART service?

I also wonder too, if hourly rates will decrease the way broadcast captioning rates did years ago?

Once the requested lower fee was met, there was a free-fall as contracts were pulled. Rates fell astoundingly until a new low was met. (Rates have since fallen.)

Sign interpreters who learned about the decrease(s) – when our equipment costs to provide services was well documented as not for the faint of heart – were amazed. They murmured to me, “And with your expenses …”

Frequently, I softly asked my friends, “How much – you two now?”

I learn(ed) two interpreters often working 20 minutes each reflects higher than my amount.

Then I am softly reminded, “And our clock starts when we leave home – with mileage. Have you ever thought about sign interpreting? It pays better.”

September 2012, I wrote in my JCR (Journal of Court Reporting) column “Beyond The Comfort Zone,” and blog “Monette’s Musings,” the article “You All Start In CART Now, Right?” That was almost six months before reading about the college’s requirements. Will we ask ”Disabled Students Programs and Services” we are being justly compensated for the skill set and for the equipment we provide, alone, hour after hour?

Working to preserve the record – wordsmiths that we are – we rise to each request. Thus, looking ahead and not over my shoulder working yet another late evening, I have to ask, “How’d that happen?”

Part I of III is posted April 7, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted April 11, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted April 27, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

An Alpha State of Mind, Part I of III

An Alpha State of Mind, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
January 3, 2013

Part I of III: Did you know that while your brain is in the alpha state that your muscles, nervous system, and cells have a different pulse per second?

Scientists have discovered that brain waves within the alpha state function at a different level of consciousness, perhaps half the normal rate. Did you know that?

Many of us do know that the alpha state is a “level” people seek while praying and meditating. Children who are taught how to reach alpha levels during chemotherapy have different (good) results while receiving medical treatment. Biofeedback teaches this information, too.

Beta is defined as the “level” needed to function while we are awake. Beta incorporates our five senses. Beta levels may have brain pulses which fluctuate 15 to 20 pulses per second.

A good night’s sleep requires the alpha level. Again, pulses in the brain define alpha.

Alpha levels are approximately seven to fourteen pulses per second. Individuals have defined “intuition” as “a state of consciousness” arising from the alpha level.

Theta is deeper than alpha, involves dreams, and is another “level” we seek to reach during a good night’s sleep. Theta has brain frequencies approximately four to seven pulses per second.

Delta is the deepest sleep level with four pulses or less. Delta levels are documented to be “dreamless.” Many define the delta level as “unconscious” with fewer than four pulses per second. I wonder if anesthesia involves delta. I do not yet know. Yet I learned much as I listened to the conversation, the words I am sharing below.

And this relates to our court reporting field how?

During a job, professionals were discussing the human body, our ability to focus, how we focus, how we store energy, and how our body works with differing brain pulses.

While I was seated in complete listening mode, and our court reporting work posture, one of the professionals who had been speaking, looked to me and was quiet. I paused and waited and waited.

Then the professional said, “Monette, since you are a court reporter, you are able to enter the alpha stage very quickly and very deeply from the beta level. Did you know that?”

Part I of III is posted January 3, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 14, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted January 28, 2013, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Wheels Slowing Spinning? What’s Your Motivation? Part III of III

Wheels Slowing Spinning? What’s Your Motivation?
Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.
October 2012

Part I began: If you could do anything with your life what would it be?

What would you ‘really’ do with your time, your heart, your ears, and your hands?

Would you share your court reporting skills with individuals who are waiting to ‘hear’ from you?

Would you work in court? Would you focus on specialty freelance reporting? Would you really work with attorneys? (Yes, I asked that question.) Many of us have enjoyed the thrill of working with attorneys and many still do now.

Would you provide CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation)?

Would you learn sign language to have the ability to share your top-shelf skills to communicate with all your consumers? Would you learn about the Little D world, Big D, oral deaf, late-deafened, and hard-of-hearing children and adults?

Would you caption? Would you be able and willing to caption during the evenings, weekends, and holidays? It goes with the territory for many broadcast captioners. I know captioners who have shared with me that they spent years writing “down the hall” or “in the basement” or “upstairs” away from their family, yet were able to hear family laughter and loud voices. Would they do it all again? Many state they would.

And there will be individuals who will read this column, tilt their heads and think, “I am doing what I really want to do. I am.”

To that I say, “Bravo.”

Part II began: Yet if you could do anything with your skills, have you made a list to find out what “that anything” is? Have you listed what you would have to learn, what you would need to finish, to accomplish that list? I know people like the term “bucket list.” If those words for you, great.

If your heart is almost full after working, or you believe it would be “fuller if …” then perhaps now is the time for you to peek up from that desk. Now may be the time to move away from some of the daily drama that we “know” fills our busy world.

When we know a commute will require a longer drive-time on a particular road, we make different choices, yes? We find another road or perhaps we leave at another time, if that is possible. Often, we will do our darnest to avoid sitting in that darn traffic.

We avoid sitting with the wheels slowly spinning.

Are your wheels slowly spinning? What is your motivation?

Part III: What would motivate you to act on your motivation once you define specifics?

Is money again at the top of the list? When was the last time you left a job, onsite or remote, as a court reporter, captioner, CART provider, or student and felt that you had pitched your best? When did you last know you accomplished what you had planned and had worked toward?

Perhaps you want to raise your expectations for your world and to believe that you do have the coping skills to live the life you planned.

When I listen to individuals sharing their dreams, their hopes, their expectations, their fears, and yes, their successes, I am honored at what is shared straight-up, no excuses given. Court reporters tell it like it is. Really straight-up.

As we prep to roll into the holidays many of us will spend time helping others. We will schedule our time around other people’s schedules, personally and professionally, adding to the expectations of others with our hearts, our ears, our hands, and our time.

I want to suggest that you remember you are an investment that will multiple into grand, new paths when you are truly making the best choices for you.

What is your motivation to get up each day? For what are you grateful each evening and within your quiet moments?

My wish is that your goals, your dreams, will begin to whisper to you.

I wish that your whispers will become dreams, then goals.

Your goals will become committed statements.

Your statements will become reality.

You are what motivates me as I finish this article late in the evening on another extended deadline.

So many reporters and students have crossed my path as a result of my years of court reporting, publishing books and CDs, learning how to provide and then sharing CART, captioning, teaching, tutoring, coaching, public speaking, and sixteen years writing this JCR (Journal of Court Reporting) “Beyond The Comfort Zone” column.

Tonight I am working with eyeglasses that are broken (yes, we just move forward, don’t we?). I am helping my mother continue to deal with serious health issues as she grieves the death of her husband (my dad) of fifty-eight years. Then I read an email or receive a message wherein you share. The spark(s), and sparkle, in many of you is what motivates me, and I thank you.

Part I of III is posted October 4, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted October 18, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted October 30, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

Thriving In Five – Or Less, Part III of III

Thriving In Five – Or Less, Part III of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Part I: Why thrive in five? Why thrive with less?

I believe the majority of individuals in the court reporting profession think of the number ‘five’ as a take, a 5-minute take.

Thriving in five? Yes.

Thriving in less than five? Yes, this relates, too.

Recently, I read that the average person thinks 50,000+ thoughts a day.

I smiled immediately thinking (adding to my average number of thoughts that day) that court reporters must have many more than 50,000 thoughts a day.

Our tenacious personalities, our “word” work and our “word” schooling, in my opinion, would add up to many more than the average person, yes? …

Part II: Is steno a new language? Yes. Do we learn new skills every day? Oh, yes.

Do we learn new words each day?

Yes, each and every day.

And that thrive in five mindset is a frequent flier program in our court reporting world.

We do earn frequent flier points and note skill advancement once we decide to focus on this concept.

The mindset is doable and assists us to measure our progress and our goals. It is.

Often I may ask where a court reporter is (spending time) advancing their skills?

Many professionals share that they practice after a full work day, “At home in my office.”

I may ask students, “Where do you attend school?”

A common answer, “Online in my room alone.” Hm. …

Part III: Thriving in five is a simplistic approach to find some fun (their words) – court reporting students and court reporters shared with me – when I trotted it into my tutoring and coaching time.

“Might as well try this,” some said. “It seems worth a go.”

My reply, “Now that’s the true spirit.”

I also suggest that individuals embrace their discomfort – momentarily – to isolate what is stopping or halting the advancement of skills and goals.

Thriving in five includes finding your interruption(s) focus, to isolate an interruption in your strength, and in your confidence.

Remember when you struggled on the steno machine in your new theory, your new language, writing “a cat sat on the hat?” Did you just smile?

We huffed and puffed writing those words, yes?

As a court reporter, “I absolutely can do this,” is one thought I have when the mojo is flowing.

I may also think, “This will never happen again.” Why? Because my head may be on a table or the steering wheel.

And the action that created that thought is one I truly do not ever want repeated. Not ever.

We earn many of the thoughts that cross our mind – remember I quoted the stat above for 50,000+ per day for the average person.

What are your favorite five word thrive in five possibilities?

Multiple individuals have shared this focus “is like scrabble, and I can use vowels and consonants.”

Each day we collect data in our personal and professional world.

We trust the method and the process that has successfully set us apart from the “average” person with our skills, our thoughts, and our focus.

Refine, define, and know that you are the expert.

Part I of III is posted July 13, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted July 31, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted August 8, 2012, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

“I Love You,” He Squealed, Part I of III

“I Love You,” He Squealed, Part I of III
By Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

He squealed, “I love you!” at the top of his lungs, multiple times, before he was physically removed, gently and lovingly.

How did that happen?

The morning began quietly.

While running errands I had a store coupon for 20 percent off everything in a store. At the door, I was handed another 10 percent coupon.

For three months I had been looking for a robe for my hospitalized father and thought perhaps this national store might have one.

Men’s robes are hard to find – outside of Christmas, I am learning.

Within the store that did not have men’s robe I saw huge signs. I selected three items, and with two coupons, I went to the intimates counter. (Lines are always shorter.)

A couple was at the register; a youngster played with a small, yellow truck on the carpet.

A high-back wood chair sits near the counter.

I sat in the chair for a moment with the hangers in my left hand.

The youngster said, loudly, “Papa chair!” The couple near the child gasped.

I nodded gently and said, “I’m good.” I looked to the child and in ASL, American Sign Language, I signed, “Now Baby Bear chair.”

Raised the daughter of two educators, (mother with a degree in special elementary education, brother born “special needs”), I am comfortable and often entertained by such moments.

The boy repeated “NO!!! Papa chair!”

Me, voicing softly and signing, “Was Papa chair. Now Baby Bear chair.”

He gasped, picked up his truck (put it in his mouth). Then he walked to me.

He took the truck out of his mouth and kissed my left arm – a big, messy kiss.

I paused before wiping my very wet arm. I removed the items to my right hand. The items I was holding (on sale 20 percent without the two coupons) now were suspended in the air.

Then he blew a loud, large raspberry on my arm.

That’s when the couple accompanying the child stepped in.

They were mortified. Me? Not at all.

The man said, “I’m so sorry! We’re taking him out to be around people. His parents are getting a divorce – six long months! – both are deaf. They can’t find interpreters to help them in court. The case continues to be delayed. We’re helping our daughter. She’s deaf.”

Part I of III is posted October 5, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part II of III is posted October 17, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Part III of III is posted October 28, 2011, on Monette’s Musings at www.monettebenoit.com and www.CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Empowerment Coach,
Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting, CART, & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

All American RealTime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?
Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: www.CRRbooks.com has material to help you advance skills for NCRA exams and state certifications?

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and empowerment coaching?
Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Empowerment coaching and tutoring topics include:

• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and empowerment coaching?

• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, to create new possibilities, to advance their career, to author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART providers, and broadcast captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Empowerment Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART providers, captioners, students, and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day.

“Monette’s Mindful Management: Wants, Needs & Pajamas, Part III

“Monette’s Mindful Management: Wants, Needs And Pajamas, Part III of III”

By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Mindful management is a term I share when I’m coaching, tutoring and assisting professionals and students with test prep. I desire to share mindful management moments with you.

Part I is linked November 5th: www.monettebenoit.com

Part II is Linked November 15th: www.monettebenoit.com

Mindful Management Part III: I softly said, “Yesterday was a need. You received pajamas on Christmas. Now, let’s figure out what you want. What do you really want for that first day of school?”

They eagerly shared details. One nephew really wanted T-shirts (all striped), jeans, and shorts (all checkered). One nephew really wanted football cleats, T-shirts (not striped) and jeans (not checkered). They beamed while describing their ‘wants’.

Off they went to the store with their mother. I chose to sit this one out knowing they spend little time together on activities like this. Soon, the phone rang with the boys phoning to give me updates. (They have never phoned with updates.)

“We didn’t find what we want, so we went to another store.”

Later I listened to, “The other store had what we want! And everything was on sale, too!”

Then, “We found what we really, really want and have money left over to get a fudge brownie. We have to get water; the drinks are too expensive. And the brownies are huge! This is great! Thanks!”

Several hours later, the doorbell rang (a surprise). I opened the door; one nephew held all his possessions up next to his face. The other nephew raced in and threw his new stuff on the floor to “let me show you now!!!!!” I beamed with pride.

As they held up their new items, each said, “This is really what I want.”

Leaving, they walked taller.

As each departed, they hugged me, I whispered, “Wants, needs and pajamas, right?”

They whispered private messages, which were my mindful moments.

Why am I writing about this?

I purchased three-ring notebooks, book covers, highlighters and items they ‘needed’ and items that the school said they ‘needed’. I also slipped each cash in case they saw something ‘essential’ … One nephew puts all money into a bank for car insurance; another nephew buys soft drinks and food for his friends who “have noooooo money, at all.”

A few days later when my phone headset broke (mid-morning on a work day), I raced to an office supply store. I was booked with coaching and court reporting all day; this headset was a ‘need’. I viewed the huge ‘SALE’ signs in the office supply store windows.

I phoned the nephews and asked one simple question, “Is there anything you need or want?”

The longest pause occurred, and I knew we were onto a new mindful moment.

When I prodded, my nephew whispered, “I don’t need anything, but I really want new pencils. And new erasers would be great. That’s all. The pencils and erasers are wants. It’s okay if I don’t get them. We can use the ones from last year. It’s not like they’re pajamas.” And he laughed.

Do you think I purchased new pencils? Yes. I gifted the items with a note, “Not Pajamas!” attached to packages of new pencils and new erasers.

Their mindful moments occurred several months ago.

As we now motor through the school year toward Thanksgiving, I hear my nephews saying, “Is ‘that’ a want or a need? You know – it’s not pajamas!”

How does this relate to our professional, technical world?

I am sitting here, Sunday evening, writing mindful management, which I want to share with each of you who may need to view the world from a different lens.

We have the ability to view each moment with a telescope or to expand our thinking.

Often it is the clarity to remember this ‘want’ or ‘need’ detail as we begin our day with tasks that are important to us – or are truly important to others, and we then accept that boundary.

Ask yourself often throughout your day and evening, “Is this a want or a need?”

When you have that detail, the goals, assignments and the never-ending lists of tasking that seem to appear in real-time will become more focused.

Remember this mindful management moment message.

Then, as the holidays approach, when you answer the phone, open your e-mails, greet friends, family and strangers, you will find that your actions and your expectations will flow with greater ease. They will.

Now you choose. Mindful management: And if I may help you, I want to do so. What do you need?

Mylegal.com Contributing Editor, Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CRI, CPE, may be reached at www.CRRbooks.com and www.ARTCS.com for private coaching.

Monette Benoit may be reached at: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal
Motivation Management & Life Coach,

Tutor and Multiple Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting & Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com

Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

All American Realtime/Captioning Services, Inc.: www.ARTCS.com

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and coaching?

Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Coaching topics include:

* Motivation skills to keep you moving forward,
* Time-management skills,
* Process learning for more effective retention,
* Communication skills and daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and coaching?

* Veteran court reporters and captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
* In-class students who feel they’re falling behind or aren’t ready for the required tests,
* Students or veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
* At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exam and career goals,
* Veteran court reporters and captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
* Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with one or two key areas of daily practice,
* Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check It Out: Reach Your Goals! Tutoring and Coaching

http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit can help you achieve at much high levels. Where do you want to go? What have you really wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life? Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:

As a 25+year court reporter, CART provider, author of NCRA test prep material and an instructor, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, students and instructors. She has also helped create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Yes, We Can, And Yes, We Did

Yes, We Can – And Yes, We Did

By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Recently I was out of state on business far from home when I encountered another “memory moment” (deaf term) that will stay with me. I work as a court reporter, court reporting instructor, tutor and coach. Of this I know to be true: if more of us could truly hear and see what’s around us, we would change the world as we know it – one person, one “moment” at a time. Yes, we can, and yes, we did.

After a long day, early evening, I stopped at a hardware store. I needed a few items. On a long (single) line in the busy store with my cart, I heard a familiar sound. I tilted my chin up. “Ahhhhahh,” a woman was pointing a man to another counter. I blinked knowingly. I smiled, she looked away.

I then debated: Could I? Should I? The line wasn’t moving as I leaned on my cart.

I smiled, quickly gestured upwards with the flick of my wrist – and waited. She looked up. Again I smiled. We looked at each other for a few seconds before I thought, “Oh, what the heck.” I began to sign (ASL) to her.

She watched and did not respond, but she was smiling. I signed that I have worked with deaf people in Texas. I had not signed in a while: “My sign stinky now.” Her smile beamed from ear to ear. She started signing so quickly, I had to remember the first sign I learned: “Slow down.”

My line barely moved toward the cashier. She and I were soon signing (ASL, American Sign Language) and communicating. Children stopped complaining, whining about standing on line in the hardware store. Adults looked stunned, clearly staring, as we laughed, spelled, signed. I had a great time; it felt good to sign again! As I approached the cashier, she nodded a brief good-bye and went back to work.

The cashier smiled. I asked if many deaf people worked there. “No, her husband works here.”

I asked the (hearing) cashier if there were interpreters. “Nope, that lady worked ‘at a deaf place’ and used to come to the store every evening. The boss would say: You don’t have a job. He wasn’t going to pay her. But she continued to show up each night. Soon she began counting the money in each register, and she was very good at it. The owner hired the lady.”

I said, “You know, she’s reading lips, communicating with others; no one’s interpreting for her. She’s very smart. Trust me.”

As I left, I turned and waved good-bye to the deaf lady. The boss arrived at her register with more money, she smiled, I nodded … off I went … or so I thought.

My car would not start. The lights turned on, but not the engine. It was now dark; I was in an unfamiliar city and stores were closing.

I strolled back into that store, flicked my wrist and signed, “Me car broke.”

The lady immediately signed to her husband, who sprinted out to my car.

Four men who worked with the couple appeared. One man moved his truck and popped our hoods to “jump” the battery. No one spoke to me; they were busy.

Within minutes, six men were in and out of my car: “What the hell’s this? What does this go to?”

They popped fuse boxes, flipped switches. I was stunned. When I looked up, the deaf lady was signing, “You no worry. My husband. You OK.”

The men fervently worked; I turned my back on my car. It was too painful to watch and no one was answering my questions; they were busy.

She and I signed and signed and signed, laughing, enjoying the nice breezes.

When my car was “fixed,” I was diagnosed with a neutral safety switch problem. Each man who had worked on my car quickly vanished into the dark.

I yelled “thanks” to their backs as they silently left.

As I turned to get into my car, the husband asked, “Do you have someplace to stay tonight?” I paused. He asked again. Standing under the street lamp, alone, stores closed, I hesitated.

Then I heard the deaf lady yelling, signing, “You OK. He my husband. You safe.” I laughed, answered his questions, and we signed for the lady, his wife.

She then signed, “Firestone. You go tomorrow.”

I started to think this would make a great SNL, Saturday Night Live, skit clip. She’s standing next to her car four spots away, signing to me. Her husband is next to me signing into the air, so she can “hear,” and I’m trying to remember all the signs my rusty fingers used to know.

I asked, “What are your names?” His reply, “Go to Firestone. Tell them Mike and the deaf lady sent you.”

“What is her name?” I asked. He said, “They just know her as the deaf lady. They’ll know who you mean.”

The third time, I asked slowly, “What is her name? What do ‘you’ call her?”

He smiled and said, “I’m Mike. She’s Millie. We work at Johnny’s.” And he continued to sign (interpret) our conversation.

I signed up into the air, “Nice meet you, Millie.”

She tapped her heart, “You not worry. Go Firestone. You OK.”

I began to giggle when I looked around. People were sitting in their cars in the dark, motionless, viewing this entire scene.

Since my car engine was running, I was afraid to turn it off. Mike continued to stay with me, smiling.

Then I asked Mike what I had signed to Millie in the store. Earlier I’d asked, “Do you watch TV?” She had said that she kept busy. Mike said, “She doesn’t like TV.”

I signed into the air, “Millie’s Big D. Signing her first language. She’s having trouble viewing captioning because too fast. Practice, reading improves.”

Mike agreed that was the reason she did not watch television. “She struggles with reading captions.”

I stopped signing to concentrate and concisely explain how broadcast captioners and CART providers help deaf and hard-of-hearing children and adults. I discussed the work I’d shared with many deaf and HOH (hard-of-hearing) groups and a deaf mass since 1993.

I signed across the parking lot, “You watch TV. Captioners help you, better reading.”

Finally, Millie said, “Yes, I watch. I will. Promise. Yes, I can.”

As I left, I thanked God for my new friends and wondered why the only place my car had broken down in 17 years was somewhere I’d just had fun and shared with a new deaf friend.

Mike and Millie at Johnny’s … if only “you” could sign, hear, see, you would shift.

I’m writing about this, yes, we can, and yes, we did because the reactions of court reporters and friends have been interesting.

All deposition court reporters and officials asked, “Why didn’t you just call a tow truck?

The CART providers and sign interpreters said, “Yeah, I get it.” Another confirmation, to me, of the differences in our consumers and possibly future clients.

I know Mike and Millie will watch captioning. If you could sign, hear and see, you too could feel that your skills are wonderful.

Our court reporting and broadcast captioning profession is a gift to others. We’re not reminded often enough … but my heart knows. It feels so right “in the moment” to communicate, help, sign and laugh.

Mike and Millie confirmed my life path (again); another “sign” from the universe. Come and join us. It’s fun. You’ll meet many people. They’ll appear anywhere during the day, the night, even in a hardware store.

Mike, Millie and I agree … yes, we can. Yes, we can sign, hear and see together as one.

Each time a deaf person taps his or her heart and smiles at me, I have another “memory moment.” It’s mine to keep forever. Do you ever wish you could have these moments? Trust me: yes, you can. Yes, we can.

About the Author:

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, is a JCR Contributing Editor for the National Court Reporters Association, NCRA. She is the author of multiple books to include the national and state RPR, RMR, RDR, CSR ‘Written Knowledge Exam’ Textbook, Workbook, a companion Study Guide, ‘The CRRT WKT’ CD Software Program, Advanced SAT, LSAT, GRE, Real-Time Vocabulary Workbook and ‘CATapult’ Dictionary CD Software Program series.


Books, CDs, private tutoring, mentoring services and articles may be referenced http://www.crrbooks.com/

Monette is an experienced consultant, instructor, realtime court reporter, tutor, life coach, CART provider, columnist.

She teaches, tutors and coaches home-study students, college students, court reporters and professionals. Monette speaks to groups at state, national and international conventions about motivation, technology, expanding skills and Deaf, Oral Deaf, Hard of Hearing.

Monette Benoit, B.B.A., Certified Court Reporter, Certified Reporting Instructor, Certified Program Evaluator, Paralegal, may be reached at: http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and http://www.artcs.com/

Cracking The Code To Testing and Court Reporting Certifications, Part Two

Cracking The Code To Testing and Court Reporting Certifications, Part Two
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2008 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Within the previous Monette’s Musings post, www.monettebenoit.com, I wrote, “Cracking the code to tests and certifications is more than a metaphor. Expanding our goals is part of our path as keeper of the record. As a tutor, coach, court reporter and CART provider, I believe one creates goals.” I shared tips to deliberately observe your conscious and unconscious thoughts and actions.

Now that you are focused on your journey, your quest, we need a formula to succeed.

Each of us has talents. What attracted you to this profession? Did (do) you have passion for your work? If your passion is tired, overworked or irritable, now is a good time to reevaluate and to set new goals.

Here I share code tips on what to deliberately eliminate.

Eliminate Negative Self-Talk Code Tip: Listen to self-talk – that dialog that runs and sprints chattering in the back of your mind. Is your chatter overwhelmed with deadlines and challenges?

Is your mantra, “I can’t do it; I’ll never be fast enough; How do I memorize every word in the English language?” As you work, practice and study, are you thinking about laundry, errands and fuel prices?

Five minutes is not a long time until you are writing dictation and self-talk chatters, “When is that person going to stop (or shut up)?” Banish this negative chatter from your path. Detach, observe and deliberately listen to yourself. Then fix it (the issue).

Complaints Code Tip: Eliminate (reduce) complaining. Much of our self-talk may be perceived as complaining. Listen to yourself. Court reporters and students I work with share, “I do that! Thanks for pointing that out. Now I’ll focus and eliminate that – self-talk.”

Avoid Trying-To-Get-It Code Tip: Don’t try, do. Years ago I met a wise woman who listened to a comment I shared. She said, “You cannot try; you can only do.” That sounded coded to me.

My memory-moment occurred when she stated, “You cannot try to sit in a chair. You either do or don’t.” She then attempted a half-sit, froze, looked at me saying, “See? You cannot try to sit.”

Part of her work was preparing people to walk on hot coals. (You know who you are. I’m surprised how many court reporters – and teachers – have done this. Some of you walked on coals with your mother. You proudly shared this with me.)

No, I don’t think hot coals are necessary for passing any certification test.

The woman’s comment imprinted a marked difference in what I took from a passing comment. As this (issue) relates to you, don’t try to get that take, don’t try to get every word or try to memorize every definition.

Don’t try to make time to study, to practice. You cannot try. Your deliberate focus is to eliminate trying and to only do.

What Am I Doing? Code Tip: Eliminate “What do I do?” moments when you study and practice. Establish a goal for that day and for that hour. A set structure of tasks will assist you to accomplish more each time you prepare. And expect a few surprises as your deliberate focus expands. Once you expect, you (re)solve.

Why Am I Doing This? Code Tip: Eliminate “Why am I doing this?” (a.k.a. “Why waste my time?”) This question is huge in our profession.

Tenacious personalities enabling individuals to excel through court reporting school (with daily pass rates of 95% or higher) and to excel (a.k.a. survive) daily technical work may, on occasion, seem overwhelming. Sometimes it is. Prep first. Don’t question why. Just do.

Repeated Mistakes Code Tip: Eliminate (reduce) mistakes. Seek to find your patterns, your mistakes. Then meticulously and deliberately go get ‘em. Eliminate one error at a time, then another error. Each error is only one point, right?

Unstructured Hours of Practicing Code Tip: Eliminate long periods of time without breaks, readbacks, or change of material. One cannot practice 12 hours a day, 7 days a week and find refreshing progress.

A court reporting student I’m tutoring said this is what she was told she needed to do to pass school and certification tests. I sighed and then systematically broke that advice into multiple pieces.

Many experienced reporters and captioners believe that long hours of work and practice require breaks to maintain strong muscles and a sharp mind. Many people who have back, arm, and wrist problems wish they knew then what they know now. They do.

Often we choose to live and work with our computers, steno machine and few breaks to fundamentally rest. Much (more) can be accomplished with structured practice, study, and rest.

Distractions: Eliminate e-mails, IMs (instant messaging), and phones when you set aside precious time for yourself. Don’t try. Just do.

Inefficiency Code Tip: Eliminate practicing at speeds over your speed without a review and without a connection to your fingers and your brain as to how a word is defined.

Without a connection, this (you) creates repetitive errors. Focus on each stroke, word, each definition. Work to find the reason(s) why you are being challenged.

What Is Not Working? Code Tip: Eliminate what you know is not working. If you work full-time, attend school, and practice when you are hungry or tired, your progress is affected. When I shared this tip with an experienced official court reporter I am tutoring, she howled with laughter, “Oh, you bet, that’s me!”

Stress, Anxiety Elimination Code Tip: I know, again, this tip is easier said than done. But this is your journey, your quest.

As I’m writing, it’s late. My Maine Coon (18-pound rescued cat) is asleep, crashed with his head down inside my sneaker. The house is dark and quiet; I worked a full day. A (rescued, abused) purring cat is on my knee while soothing music is playing. I have a deadline with my editor. To squeeze more into my day (and night) this is how I meet a goal I created to become more productive. What works for you? Do that.

Use your time wisely, fix mistakes, rest, learn what works for you, and then combine your formula to succeed.

What works for you one day or one week, will need alterations. Change is good when you have a plan, are prepared, rested, and deliberately focused in your current moment.

When you focus your path and are aware of insights with what works for you and what does not, your progression is greater. Success is more noticeable as you deliberately connect to focused intentions, conscious actions and your positive chatter.

Your goal is to perform at your peak and to focus on your success.

With awareness, you achieve greater results with less stress, which result in greater success. Your internal compass, your code, will guide you. It will.

Within my previous post I shared nutrition code tips; body, toes, fingertips code tips; radar code tips; inspiration code tips; common sense code tips; oxygen code tips; nest code tips; toxic decoding code tips; realtime focus code tips; entrance code tips; and people red-alert code tips.

Musicians play all the chords. Athletes work all the muscles for one sport.

You are the master of your path. Deliberately reduce and eliminate distractions. Invest in yourself.

The court reporters, broadcast captioners and CART providers I work with share an important lesson from my tutoring and coaching is: “Clearly define your boundaries.” Check your boundaries, observe your talents, align your goals.

This power-full quest to your code and passing tests can be (more) effort-less. Don’t try, do.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Cracking The Code To Testing And Passing Court Reporting Certifications


Cracking The Code To Testing And Passing Court Reporting Certifications, Part One

By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2008 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Cracking the code to tests and certifications is more than a metaphor.

Expanding our vision and our goals are part of our path as court reporters, the keeper of the record, historical conservator, and protector of spoken words.

If you are focused on changing your life, you are having internal conversations. As an experienced court reporter, tutor, coach and CART provider, I truly believe one can create and transform his or her goals.

For 20 years, I have been honored to assist students (to include home-study individuals), broadcast captioners and court reporters to earn their national, NCRA, and state certification tests.

My students have been my greatest teachers, my leaders. Your success is my goal.

I have authored a textbook, workbooks and a companion study guide to assist individuals to pass their NCRA and state court reporting certification exams the first time they register. We also assist students, captioners and court reporters to build and to expand their realtime and captioning dictionary with ‘CATapult Your Dictionary CDs’.

Thousands of students and court reporters have worked with CRR Books and CDs (Court Reporter Reference Books And CDs, www.CRRbooks.com).

CRR Books And CDs has organized focused information on how to pass a NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, RPR, RMR, RDR, written knowledge examination – known as the ‘WKT’ since 1990.

States also have CSR, CCR certification examinations for court reporters. CRR Books And CDs has successfully assisted individuals there, too.

So you want to pass a test? My desire is to help you to shift your awareness.

If you want to pass a test in a court reporting program or a national certification test, ‘wanting’ is not enough. You need to prep with deliberate, focused intentions, conscious actions.

Recently, I received requests on how to prep from applicant test-takers for NCRA, California, Texas, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Florida, New Mexico, Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington, and Arizona state examinations.

I desire to gift you with tips, information to focus your internal compass.

Thousands of students and reporters have accomplished huge goals – one step at a time, one step, one step – sometimes only in one tiny step – then there’s a wobble.

Now is the time to prepare your stimulus plan.

Now is the time to hone your conscious and unconscious thoughts and actions to crack the code to pass your test.

I firmly believe one-step-at-a-time awareness is where you find greatest progress. Even a step back is a step. This awareness is essential to your code, your internal compass.

Okay. So you registered to take a NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, or a state court reporting certification test? Or maybe not yet, but soon?

Are you enrolled in a court reporting school or home study program?

You now have an opportunity to stretch your boundaries. Stretching is good. Be gentle and remain focused on this goal, which is easier said than done – I know.

Many students and working court reporters can see and taste this lap while pedaling with an already busy schedule.

Below are tips to successfully crack your code — tips I coach to help many, many in your (busy) shoes. Part II will be added to assist you.

Nutrition Code Tips: Consciously focus on your blood sugar with smart eating, snacking. Vitamins are essential to preparing physical and mental compass charting of your code.

Carbohydrates create long-term energy while pasta and rice ensure your body functions at peak performance.

Proteins create short-term energy and if (when) you balance carbohydrates and proteins, you’re in athletic training. Hydrate ‘you’ (yourself) with water, perhaps green tea, Gatorade-type drinks. Sodas taste good, but many cause dehydration with additives and sugar. Stress contributes to depleting fluids. Avoid dehydrating your body; instead drink water and other helpful fluids.

Body, Toes, Fingertips Code Tips: Wear comfortable clothes, footwear. This awareness tip should be incorporated into your daily routine to prep for a court reporting (or any) test.

If you are taking a machine portion of any test, your fingertips (nails) must function at peak performance. Many students and reporters have manicures. I softly share that now is not the time to test a new length or style. What works best for you? Use that.

Radar Code Tips: As you move closer to your scheduled test, I want you to specifically notice your energy-awareness.

Code-cracking includes becoming aware that you may be more sensitive at work and school with family and yourself. Some call this “cranky,” but I prefer “sensitive.” This is normal. Once you are aware this energy is part of your preparation, you can acknowledge the awareness, and then let these test prep code tips work for you. I know you can learn a lot about yourself as you hone and fine-tune your radar, your sensitivity meter.

Inspiration Code Tips: Take time for you. Have you listened to a favorite CD? Is there a movie where you find inspiration? Have you laughed recently? When we focus on a long-term goal, I firmly believe it is the little moments (note it’s plural) in our world wherein we most effectively gain momentum toward our goal.

Common Sense Code Tips: Pack equipment – and you – before the test. Avoid gassing the car en route. Make sure there is no construction near the site. I coach that you should be packed by mid-afternoon the day before. This ensures reducing, “Dang, where did I put …?”

Oxygen Code Tips:
Stretch and breathe. When stressed, we sit with our shoulders hunched up and breathe shallowly. (Every time I proofed this sentence I noticed I was not breathing evenly.)

Consciously focus on a steady rhythm of evenly breathing in and breathing out to maximize your body’s ability to work for you.

Focus on regulating your breath. If your voice is higher than normal, you are shallow breathing. Become aware of your breath. Your body will respond with a good-sized release of stressed energy. Tip: The more oxygen your brain receives, the better you function.

Nest Code Tips: Ah, sleep. Focus on your nesting routine. The final two nights before the test, I suggest taking a warm bath or shower, curling up with a human, pet, or book, and being quiet. In your quiet moments and quiet rituals, you will find great focus, comfort. This is how you recharge.

Toxic Decoding – Code Tips: Avoid high maintenance people – really. We all know people who have toxic moments. If someone has multiple toxic moments, focus on removing your energy (you). You want to be comforted and remain focused. When there are multiple pulls (drains) for your energy, your internal compass will recognize the problem. It does. Please remember you earned the right to this peaceful, focused prep toward your goal.

Realtime Focus Code Tips: The morning of your test, consciously monitor fluids. Caffeine takes you up in an energy burst; then drops you when the burst has bust.

I coach that each person should pack red grapes and a packet of non-salted pretzels and nuts. There is an amazing abundance of energy in red grapes and snacks. (The last time I went to the movies my mother whispered, “Want some?” I tilted my head, looked to her hand in my ribs. She held a small bag of red grapes and two paper towels. Mom, “They are so good, and quiet, too.” I softly groaned and looked to where my dad sat. He shrugged, slowly shaking his head as my mother handed me red grapes in a paper towel. Mom added, “And I washed them.”) Red grapes are portable and good for you – at the movies or within a test site. Yes, I know food is not allowed. But you can snack at appropriate times. You can.

Entrance Code Tips: When you enter your testing site, consciously arrive with your shoulders back and chin up. If this is a return walk, focus on the now. If this is your virgin stroll, a click of your fingers or a sacred moment in prayer may serve you to focus. Now is where you need to be.

People Red-Alert Code Tips: Avoid huddled groups and agitated chatting. Specifically avoid anyone who asks: “What does this mean?” “How do you write…?” “How many times did it take you to …?” Now is your time. You need to consciously remain focused on your code, your test prep awareness.

Understanding Code Awareness: When you consciously perform at your peak and focus on your success, with step-by-step awareness, you can achieve greater results with less effort – with less stress, resulting in greater success. You will. Your internal compass will guide you. It will.

This month I shared tips to add for deliberate, conscious thoughts and actions. Next month, I share tips on what to eliminate with part two of Cracking The Code To Testing and Court Reporting Certifications.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!

Fingers, Ears, and Heart Wide Open

Fingers, Ears, and Heart Wide Open

By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Court reporters and court reporting instructors are fascinating!

Court reporting students have wonderful stories to share with detailed triumphs and challenges each has overcome. And I believe this is what makes this profession so wonderful.

During the NCRA (National Court Reporters Association) Teachers’ Workshop, I was enjoying dinner in a fine restaurant. My companions shared thoughts and ideas. While Cecilee Wilson spoke, Gayl Hardeman, Laura Taylor and I listened intently.

As we dined and I listened to Cecilee, I knew court reporting students and working court reporters, CART providers and broadcast captioners would want to know this true story.

Each day as I tutor experienced court reporters and court reporting students, I affirm that we are each talented in our unique way. Cecilee Wilson expanded my world and now here I share with you.

Cecilee Wilson, RMR, CRR, is a captioner and CART provider. She is inspirational. Cecilee finished school in Bountiful, Utah, and married her high school sweetheart. Her husband told her about co-workers attending reporting school. They were going to work a little and retire early because of the money.

“Then he said, ‘Bet you can’t do that,’” recalls Cecilee.

Cecilee enrolled. “I didn’t do well; others were better. I’d rather go to the dentist and get teeth drilled without Novocain than go to (court reporting) class.”

She and her husband joined the Air Force. They were stationed in New Jersey. She enrolled in Harris School of Business. Cecilee discharged after her daughter’s birth. They were transferred to England, then Salt Lake. She transferred to Abilene and enrolled in the Stenograph Institute of Texas.

She worked hard, passing a test each week until December, took time off to have her third baby girl, returned in January and passed the RPR in May 1977. Cecilee moved back to Salt Lake City and continued reporting.

She split with her husband after 14 years and five children, including a four-month-old son. On her baby’s six-month birthday, Cecilee’s neighbor asked if she wanted a ride on his Harley.

A car pulled out. “I heard the boom and blacked out.” She remembers saying, “Well, I’m not dead, that’s good.”

She gave herself a physical. “I needed a Band-Aid on my hand. If my feet would get the feeling back, I’d go to work tomorrow.” It was dark. She couldn’t see the bones sticking out of her hand and didn’t know both feet were broken.

Her right hand was pinned and casts were put on both legs. The pins were removed and “my divorce was final the same week. A friend offered to line me up with some guy.”

Cecilee was readmitted with an infection in her arm. “MY friend wanted me to meet him. My blind date consisted of her and her husband bringing him to the hospital. He joked I was a cheap date. We got married in three months.”

Within two years, they had a baby. “Eight kids: five mine, two his and one ours,” she says.

She was out of work nine months with three surgeries and physical therapy. Cecilee recovered “almost all of my hand. I was a reporter again.”

She wanted to caption in 1989 but hit dead ends.

“When my mother died in ’92, I used my inheritance for everything—captioning software, encoder,” she explains.

“I called a station and told them I’d caption pro bono the governor’s state of the state address. The station decided to caption a script, but kept my card. In March, Easter Seals was looking to caption their telethon. The station gave them my card. I captioned 14 hours in two days. Soon I captioned the University of Utah’s football games, which led to Utah Jazz and University of Utah basketball. And I was still working in court.”

During her second Jazz season, the Utah Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing phoned.

“They had seen my blurb at the end of games.”

She met with the council. They took her to meet the TV station general managers. Nobody was interested then. Later she was contacted by a general manager who wanted to caption—the next week.

“I was walking out the door for a trip to Hawaii.” She negotiated from her hotel and started the next week. Six months later she took on another station.

She worked all day in court, wrote the 5:30 news from her office, drove home and wrote the 9 and 10 p.m. news or a three-hour game. She finished at 11:45 p.m. one night with a game in overtime and trial the next morning.

“Clearly this was killing me,” says Cecilee. “I had to quit court; the rest is history.”

Cecilee now has six grandchildren, three girls, three boys.

She spends her free time knitting, crocheting, spinning, and quilting.

They raise sheep. “As lawn mowers for pasture; in the spring we shear them. I spin the wool, as time allows. We put some in the freezer. When my kids want to know what the name is of the new lamb, we say, ‘Dinner’. It keeps the in-laws from visiting, especially when they know the Thanksgiving turkey is grown in our yard.”

Her husband, Leroy, has a degree in ceramic art and currently is earning a degree in education. He wants to teach. “He does all the cooking,” she says. “Sometimes he brings me food while I’m captioning.” During a Salt Lake City tornado, she was on-air four hours with no commercials. He brought sodas with a straw and held them for her.

One year, she “thought it would be cool to make an NCRA centennial quilt and donate it to the NCRF auction.” NCRF sent past logos.

“That became the main design. I have quilt frames behind my chair. During commercials, I have a hard time doing nothing for two minutes. I turn around, quilt, drop the needle and caption again.”

As she recounted these details, my Pittsburgh dining companions and I listened. You could’ve heard a pin drop at our table. I slowly sipped my glass of wine, wide-eyed as she spoke.

I asked Cecilee what motivates her.

“The only thing remarkable about me is that I am very unremarkable. People have supported and helped me. I am continually thankful.”

What keeps her smiling?

“I think my life is a reflection of love of God and Jesus Christ—God for allowing me trials and giving me strength to overcome them; Jesus Christ for giving me His example and being my savior. That’s really the truth.”

I’ll always remember her gracious big smile and gentle laugh.

Cecilee Wilson is way beyond any comfort zone. Ears, fingers, heart and wise soul, wide open, sharing truly and purely.

Monette Benoit may be reached at: Tutoring@CRRbooks.com

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part IV of VII

CART FAQ: Falling On Deaf Ears, Part IV of VII
By Monette Benoit

Copyright by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

Comments to my CART FAQ articles continue to percolate. So shall my responses.

The following are questions I work to address pro bono as we move forward within our careers. To further assist you, Part I, II and III and many articles that I’ve written about my experiences with CART and deaf topics are online at http://www.catapultdix.com/ and Monette’s Musings, http://www.monettebenoit.com/

When I attended the national NCRA convention in New Orleans to learn, to see old buddies, to greet new friends, I listened to many individuals who stated they wanted and needed to share with me as an experienced court reporter, tutor and CART provider.

Many people are motivated, energized and ready to move forward. Some are angry and frustrated. I’m convinced that where you are depends on how you stay up with technology.

Those “frustrated” (their words) admitted they do not have the skills, knowledge or attitude to move forward. Those excited for the future created time to become familiarized with where they want to go. I share questions I received. Numbers 25-28, sadly, I’ve heard many times.

25. “Can I practice on college students? I need to learn how to provide CART.”

I was asked this so often, I picked up the mic during a NCRA, National Court Reporters Association, panel seminar, and from the panel seat in front of the room, I replied, “Hell, no,” and dropped the mic on the table. It bounced.

We need to be very careful where we practice. Practicing “on” anyone who is relying upon our professional skills for an education, grade, degree, job or minutes is inappropriate.

We can practice in our home or the back of a room (perhaps at a public meeting or in a church), with the screen down. When people approach to view and/or purchase a transcript, the practicing reporter/student should be very careful.

This is their first impression of you – one long remembered.

Usually, movers and shakers attend meetings to advance their rights. It would be unwise to share work you believe to be inferior to the minutes of any meeting. (Even if they say it’s okay to have untranslates, trust me, they remember.)

Just as theory students wouldn’t think about practicing (sharing a screen or record) in court, CART providers must work toward their goal. Time invested into the goal benefits everyone – you, most of all.

26. “Can I practice in church?”

Again, practice depends on where you are. If you’re practicing within a church, screen down, reach for heaven and the stars. If you’re practicing and learning on a large screen or television, people relying on your skills may not receive “the Word of God.”

I learned in the corner, screen down. After several months, I moved forward with my practice. Skills depend on practice.

Most church terms are not within a court reporter’s dictionary. I was humbled many a time. I excelled in learning how to fingerspell on the fly (in realtime), and I added thousands of words into my dictionary before I went up on the screen.

I built my skills. This assisted everyone dependent upon my large screen during a mass dedicated to Catholic Deaf to “hear” God’s Word.

I received so many requests on this topic from working captioners, we developed a specific tool to assist religious writers. Volume E, Universal Religions Interactive CD has 40,000 terms for the ‘CATapult Your Dictionary’ CD series to assist people preparing for this path. (This CD and others are listed at http://www.catapultdix.com/.)

27. “I’m too busy to read the JCR. I’m only here for CE points. How do I learn CART, then CART remotely to the Net? I may have clients requesting this service soon.”

Everyone has to eat lunch. Everyone sits at traffic lights, in bank parking lots. Time is there. There are many opportunities to learn how to do CART. State and national conventions have CART seminars. To not attend seminars that teach how to provide this service is truly sad in my opinion.

I wouldn’t even consider CARTing to the Internet without extra hands, phone lines, equipment and technical expertise. Yes, there are some who CART remotely without extra hands, but each will share they’ve had problems. Lines go down; equipment problems occur; technical issues arise.

I wouldn’t even consider doing a remote job without technical assistance. Writing to the Internet is a job for advanced CART providers. You will have problems working jobs when you’re not seated next to your consumer/audience. Every captioner has an engineer, so should CART providers. For those who have prepared and have learned the CART remote ropes, the sky’s the limit!

28. “How much does it pay?” Please see my previous answers.

29. “I’m a CART provider and was contacted by someone who may Baker Act (commit) a deaf person. The reporters with the contract do not do CART. I’m concerned about the deaf person, their rights. Someone advised: ‘God takes care of people.’ Should I let them work this out?”

I came to a complete halt in my work and immediately phoned this reporter, saying softly, “God does not want the deaf person to get a poor job.” Then I spoke honestly and thanked this professional for reaching out to me prior to accepting this job.

Oh, my gosh! We’re guardians of the record; professionals that people look to for accuracy.

We must know when to reach out and request guidance and additional help. If someone is going to provide CART for a deaf person in any setting, that reporter must be qualified.

Are they Deaf, deaf, oral, hard-of-hearing or early deafened?

To provide realtime for any deaf or hard-of-hearing person, we must determine if the person needs a sign interpreter and/or CART provider. If the person’s first language is sign language, then it’s usually the interpreter. If the person is asked, we need to honor their choice.

Mike O’Donnell is “a deaf professional involved in the field of communication accessibility services over 13 years.” He’s a gifted man, owning Com Access, Bethesda, MD. His logo: Where Communication Barrier Has No Place.

Mike attends our NCRA conventions, works with CART providers and uses sign interpreters to assist him. He reached out to us. We need to embrace his knowledge and hear about the personal experiences he and others have had. They live with moments we can only read and write about.

We sat next to each other at the New Orleans presidential banquet. During dinner, when I signed, “My brother died one year ago tonight,” Mike took my hands, bowed his head and signed (said) a prayer to God for my brother. My world stood still — again — and I felt blessed for being embraced in this community and the trenches.

Mike has earned my respect for his commitment to all of us working together. May this be so, always.

I wish you a blessed path – in realtime – as you read this. Let’s reach out and share in realtime one set of ears, one set of hands at a time.

And yes, you have my permission to share my articles. My online articles are preserved under the CART Special Interest Group, http://cart.ncraonline.org/, http://www.catapultdix.com/ and http://www.monettebenoit.com/

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RMR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘ER Done In Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are listed online, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics specific details, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabularly, medical, and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The “Test Prep Set” includes four volumes – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. Bring it. * Bring it today!

"Still Processing And Snowglobes"

“Still Processing And Snowglobes”
By Monette Benoit

Copyright 2006 by Monette Benoit, All Rights Reserved.

“You’re processing; you’re not stuck,” began my correspondence with Janet Tilly, a student who contacted me. She had written, “I am currently stuck trying to attain 170 words per minute.”

My April 2005 ‘Beyond The Comfort Zone’ article and Monette’s Musings Blog, www.monettebenoit.com, detailed how one sentence I shared shifted had changed Janet’s processing. Less than one year later (after being ‘stuck’), Janet entered our profession with determination, processing and captioning, court reporting CATapult CD material.

Janet recently emailed, “Still processing! I completed school. I discovered I have something new to process. After reading your words about processing, I never looked at school the same way. You took the time to go beyond my questions about your CATapult CD product. You took the time to address the root of my problem, which turned out to be a problem of perception and mindset.”

Janet shares: “I thought most of the ‘processing’ would be in court reporting school. I knew transitioning from school to work would be taxing, but I didn’t realize I would process now more than ever.

“My second deposition reflected my processing had just begun. I can’t express how grateful I am that you, Monette, pointed out the mentality of processing. I don’t think I could get up every morning, facing unknowns without having it all in perspective. Life is one big learning experience; court reporting is part of my life, so I shouldn’t expect this to be different than other things I learn each day.

“To all students: Finishing school is not the end of learning, it’s the beginning. Prepare on the front end; don’t be surprised by opportunities to process once you graduate! Like Monette’s sister-in-law Wenny wrote, whenever we are down, we have to get up, ‘try harder; each time you try harder.’ Your sister-in-law Wenny blessed me with a mantra from the January 2005 ‘Beyond The Comfort Zone’ article, “Try Harder; Each Time ‘You’ Try Harder!” (This article about Wenny, January 2005, and Janet’s April 2005 article may be accessed on http://www.crrbooks.com/ http://www.catapultdix.com/ and blog Monette’s Musings)

“I‘m now out of school; sometimes it feels like I’m in a snowglobe that keeps getting shaken. Working was exciting, but scary. I had interned as often as I could. The reporters I interned with were fantastic. Reporters answered any questions, pointing out things I didn’t know to ask about. And I was nervous! I can’t remember praying as hard as I prayed before my first deposition. (My prayers were answered when I held it together during readback.) After, I was walking on clouds; you would have thought I had orchestrated world peace.

“The next day, I was confident, still walking on clouds. This is the first time my snowglobe was shaken. The doctor specialized in otolaryngology; I know this because everyone said it as often as possible. He detailed thyroidectomy, parathyroid, cricothyroid fascia, isthmus and thyroplasty. My saving grace: The witness spoke slowly, enunciating well; attorneys took notes, pausing between answers and questions. This wasn’t the scary part — that happened when the deposition ended.

“I was realtiming for myself, recording audio on my laptop. The firm owner proofs my work. Because I am new and paranoid, I also had a digital recorder. Into the deposition, I realized I had not turned on the laptop audio. At first pause, I turned it on. I started obsessing: “Did I drop?” I knew the recorder was on, but couldn’t stop the mental process. Then someone mentioned otolaryngology snapping me back into the moment. I stopped the panic, sure I’d written well, worked to continue doing so.

“Long story short, there were several minutes when the attorneys stopped the depo, then needed to go back on the record where I had no audio. No audiosync, plus no digital recording! I pressed the wrong button on the digital recorder, twice! “Once I saw the recorder had not recorded, I thought about the depo, still confident I’d written well, verbatim. Days later, I started worrying.

“Editing, I remembered, while packing at the end, the attorneys were talking to one another; I overhead their conversations. Editing, I remembered things I knew were said, but were not in my transcript. Since I was new, I started obsessing. What if statements I were remembered were ‘on the record’ and not conversations? I couldn’t have dropped all that. No way. Wait a minute; what about in school when I knew I’d passed that test, but didn’t? Here I knew I’d written well on the job.

“This argument went through my head all night; the next morning I was throwing up. I was sure I’d never report again. Mentally, I turned an ant hill into Mount Everest. I don’t have words to describe how far out of proportion this had been blown. I called the firm owner. She calmed me saying this was going to be okay. She said she’d help me; we would look at the transcript, see what we thought. After talking with her, I began to think rationally.

“Thinking clearly, instead of worse-case-scenario, I realized I was borrowing trouble. I had concentrated so hard on writing, my head hurt, I ached all over. I had felt good until I let my imagination run away with me. I printed the transcript; it was good. Well, it was good after it had been proofed by someone else and corrections were made. Who knew commas would challenge me at age 36?

“This story can be picked apart backwards, forwards. You bet I haven’t made those mistakes again; there have been others, but not those. This is somewhat embarrassing, but maybe someone will benefit from it. I have more days where I left jobs walking on clouds than I have feeling like I was in the snowglobe. I’ve made mistakes; I’ve beat myself up over them, but when finished, I filed them, taking what I learned, leaving negativity behind. And the next day, I processed, tried harder.

“I’ve been so lucky; my instructors, fellow students were the best. I interned with experienced reporters who, I’m sure, had better things to do than answer my questions.

“To the people who shared in forums and have written JCR (NCRA Journal of Court Reporting) articles, thank you! Several times I encountered situations and knew what to do because I’d read about it. I wish I could thank everyone who helped me. The only things I know to do to begin thanking them are to continue improving and to one day help new reporters. Bless you all!”

Monette: Spoken like a veteran, Janet. We are never stuck unless we choose to be.

We process, building experiences and wisdom from within, sometimes alone, sometimes with others. Yet when we process, “trying harder each time,” perhaps our snowglobe is not blurry. Perhaps it is a remarkable globe we may view with sparkle and wonder.

The snowglobe on my desk, gifted by a student, now court reporter, is a ballerina atop pink heart-shaped flakes, arms folded in prayer. Large print reads: “Lord, Keep Me On My Toes.” Still processing, Janet, you have helped thousands, seated and on your toes.

Monette, the Court Reporting Whisperer, may be reached: Monette@ARTCS.com and Monette@CRRbooks.com

Monette Benoit, B. B.A., CCR, CRI, CPE, Paralegal

Tutor, Motivational Management & Career Coach,
Multiple-Title Author of Books & Test Prep for the Court Reporting and CART Captioning Industry
Realtime Court Reporter, Instructor, Consultant, Columnist

Court Reporter Reference Books & CDs: www.CRRbooks.com
Blog: Monette’s Musings, www.monettebenoit.com

* Educational/Career Advancement; Private Tutoring/Customized Coaching

Have you failed NCRA’s RPR, RDR, or a state court reporting exam?

“Get ‘eR Done in Just One” – as evidenced by the many students and professionals who study Court Reporter Reference Books to pass their RPR, CSR, and RDR exams on the first test. Testimonials are online — from students, instructors, program directors, CART Captioners, novice and senior court reporters, www.CRRbooks.com.

** Pedagogically sound, covering a wealth of material with facts, tips, and comprehensive information, the Purple Books from CRRbooks.com are time-tested and proven in the classroom with educators and with independent study.

The “Complete NCRA RPR, RDR, and CSR Test Prep Textbook, 6th Edition” has greatly expanded testing tips, testing focus, NCRA COPE Ethics, grammar sections, plus — legal, Latin, court, English, grammar, vocabulary, medical, technology and computer chapters. www.CRRbooks.com

The Workbook contains **2,002 practice test questions; the Companion Study Guide cross-references every word in the workbook’s 2,002 multiple-choice text practice questions.

The “Full Test Prep Set” and “Trio Test Prep” – each listed on www.CRRbooks.com

Monette will help you to pass your test and to exceed schooling and career goals. http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=61

Did You Know: You can accelerate your career with private tutoring and career coaching? Court reporting veteran Monette Benoit can help you achieve your goals.

Tutoring and career coaching topics include:
• Motivational skills to keep you moving forward,
• Time-management skills,
• Process learning for more effective retention,
• Development of skills to author your book, your blog, and how to publish,
• Communication skills, daily interaction improvement skills, and much more.

Who comes to Monette for tutoring and career coaching?
• Professionals who want to achieve their goals, create new possibilities, advance their career, author their book, and to develop the dream within,
• Veteran and novice court reporters, CART (Communication Access Real-Time Translation) providers, and broadcast captioners brushing up on their skills for test-taking requirements,
• In-class students who feel they’re “stuck” and falling behind, or aren’t ready for the required tests,
• Students and veterans who struggle with focus, goal-setting, time-management or other life skills that might be interfering in their upward success,
• At-home students who want to ensure they’re on track for their exams and for their career goals,
• Veteran court reporters, CART Captioners expanding their career options in related fields,
• Students and veterans alike who find they’re struggling with key areas of daily practice,
• Students or veterans who have begun to question their career or whether they’re on the “right track” …

Check out: Reach Your Goals with Tutoring and Career Coaching
http://crrbooks.com/index.php?cPath=29

Monette Benoit, the Court Reporting Whisperer, can help you achieve at much high levels.

Where do you want to go? ** What have you ‘really’ wanted to do with your career, and ultimately, your life?

* No two are alike. Specific custom-designed guidance efficiently assists you!

About Monette Benoit:
As a 25+ year court reporter, CART Captioner, author of NCRA test prep material, and an instructor, public speaker, Monette Benoit has taught multiple theories, academics, all speed classes, and the 225 homeroom within NCRA-approved schools and a community college. She understands the challenges many adults now face in our industry and schooling.

Monette Benoit has worked with thousands of professionals, court reporters, CART Captioners, students, and instructors.

She has also helped to create new court reporting training programs, worked with federal grants, and assisted instructors in developing curriculum for both in-class and at-home students.

Her one-on-one tutoring, private coaching, has greatly assisted thousands of students, novice and experienced professionals to privately reach the next level.

Monette’s Musings is a blog containing information for busy professionals, students, and individuals who are fearless and seek to create their success each day. Reach up. Bring it. * Bring it today!